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New York, June 9, 1803. Gives his opinion concerning Graves’s legal questions and states: “Having myself lands in the vicinity of those of Mr. Scriba, I have occasionally received some information concerning the latter.… Some of my lands are now selling to settlers at the rate of three Dollars per acre.” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. This letter was written in reply to Graves to...
I arrived here this day, in about as good health as I left home though somewhat fatigued. There are some things necessary to be done which I omitted mentioning to you. I wish the Carpenters to make and insert two Chimnies for ventilating the Ice-House, each about two feet Square & four feet long half above and half below the ground—to have a cap on the top sloping downwards so that the rain...
Yesterday, My beloved Eliza, I wrote you by water to the care of a Capt Boyed. I in that letter informed you of my painful detention here by the slow progress of the Court and of my extreme anxiety to be with you. Your Sister Peggy had a better night last night than for three weeks past and is much easier this morning. Yet her situation is such as only to authorise a glimmering of hope. Adieu...
It is with great pleasure, I am able to inform my beloved Eliza that I continue to progress in convalescence; so that I propose to go to day from your Uncles where I have been to claverack where the Arbitrators are. But I do not mean to take any other part than that of Chamber Counsel in the business, till I am quite strong, for it will be my careful endeavour not to hazard another relapse. I...
This morning my b⟨e⟩loved Eliza I leave Albany for C⟨lav⟩erack, my health greatly mended ⟨a⟩nd I hope to make but a short stay there. My plan is to go to Poughkepsie and there embark. I shall be glad to find that my dear little Philip is weaned, if circumstances have rendered it prudent. It is of importance to me to rest quietly in your bosom. Adieu my beloved. Kiss all the Children for me....
I am vexed and chagrined, My beloved Eliza, that I cannot come out to day as I intended. I had requested a Meeting of the Manumission Society for this forenoon; but for some reason unknown to me, it is called for this Evening seven oClock. I cannot of course help attending and I have little hope that it will break up in time to make the journey this Evening. To indemnify myself, in some sort,...
I was extremely disappointed, My Dear Eliza, that the Mondays post did not bring me a letter from you. You used to keep your promises better. And you know that I should be anxious to hear of your health. If the succeeding post does not rectify the omission of the former I shall be dissatisfied and pained. I am chagrined at the prospect of being detained considerably longer than I expected. Our...
I arrived here, my beloved, about five this afternoon. According to my first day’s journey, I ought now to be much further advanced. But some how Riddle sprained the ancle of one of his hind legs, which very much retarded my progress to day. By care and indulgence, he is much better this Evening; so that I count upon being able to reach Albany with him early on Wednesday morning. I have...
I was much relieved, My Dear Eliza by the receipt yesterday morning of your letter of Monday last. How it came to be so long delayed, I am unable to conjecture. But the delay gave much uneasiness in consequence of the imperfect state of health in which I had left you. Thank God you were better—for indeed my Eliza you are very essential to me. Your virtues more and more endear you to me and...
I have just arrived here and shall stay till tomorrow. It has always appeared to me that the ground on which our Orchard stands is much too moist. To cure this a ditch round it would be useful, perhaps with a sunken fence as a guard. But this last may be considered at a future time. If you can obtain one or two more labourers, it may be adviseable to cut a ditch round the Orchard—three feet...
[ Albany, March 8, 1801. On March 9, 1801 , Hamilton wrote to his wife: “Yesterday, My beloved Eliza, I wrote you.” Letter not found. ]
The Senate has refused on account of the interference with other business to hear any more causes this session; so that were it not for the situation of your Sister Peggy, her request that I would stay a few days longer and the like request of your father and mother, I could now return to you. But how can I resist these motives for continuing a while longer? Things must change this week but at...
I am here, my beloved Eliza, on my way to Albany —in much better health than I have been since my first attack at home. To avoid the risk of bringing on a relapse by too much exercise, it is my intention to continue here ’till tomorrow morning. Judge Benson is with me. The Arbitrators are gone to view the land in which business they will be engaged till Wednesday. On that day I must be back at...
On Saturday, My Dear Eliza, your sister took leave of her sufferings and friends, I trust, to find repose and happiness in a better country. Viewing all that she had endured for so long a time, I could not but feel a relief in the termination of the scene. She was sensible to the last and resigned to the important change. Your father and mother are now calm. All is as well as it can be; except...
I am just arrived here after a very comfortable journey. Our intention is to reach Albany on Wednesday morning, from which place I shall immediately write to you. I am less and less pleased with the prospect of so long a separation from my beloved family & you may depend shall shorten it as much as possible. Dumphey had planted the Tulip Trees in a row along the outer fence of the Garden in...
I thank you My Betsy for your letter from Fish Kill. I hope the subsequent part of your journey has proved less fatiguing than the two first days. I have anticipated with dread your interview with your father. I hope your prudence and fortitude have been a match for your sensibility. Remember that the main object of visit is to console him; that his own burthen is sufficient, and that it would...
Captain Church, My Dear Betsy, has just arrived & brings me favourable accounts of your journey hitherto and prospects. It is a great comfort to me and I hope will not be marred by bad weather; so that you may all speedily arrive and without too much fatigue to sooth and console your affected Father. Now you are all gone and I have no effort to make to keep up your spirits, my distress on his...
This letter, my very dear Eliza, will not be delivered to you, unless I shall first have terminated my earthly career; to begin, as I humbly hope from redeeming grace and divine mercy, a happy immortality. If it had been possible for me to have avoided the interview, my love for you and my precious children would have been alone a decisive motive. But it was not possible, without sacrifices...
I am here my beloved Betsy with my two little boys John & William who will be my bed fellows to night. The day I have passed was as agreeable as it could be in your absence; but you need not be told how much difference your presence would have made. Things are now going on here pretty and pretty briskly. I am making some innovations which I am sure you will approve. The remainder of the...
This morning, My beloved Eliza, I arrived here to pay a visit to your father, in the interval of the postponement of our causes, as I mentioned in a letter which I wrote you on Friday from Claverack. Your father’s wound is much better and your mother in good health. Your sisters are both on a visit to Rensselaer; but expected back to day or tomorrow. In the morning I return to Claverack. I am...
I wrote to my beloved from Rhinebeck . Yesterday Evening I arrived here and found your family generally well. Your father’s leg is not quite cured but it continues in a good way & Stringer promises that it will soon be perfectly sound. I have not, myself, been in better health for a great while, and all I want to complete my happiness is that your health should be restored. Pray take care of...
Mrs. Mitchel is the person in the world to whom as a friend I am under the greatest Obligations. I have ⟨not⟩ hitherto done my ⟨duty⟩ to her. But ⟨resolved⟩ to repair my omission as much as ⟨possible,⟩ I have encouraged her to come to ⟨this Country⟩ and intend, if it shall be ⟨in my po⟩wer to render the Evening of her days ⟨c⟩omfortable. But if it shall please God to put this out of my power...
I have reached this place, my dear Eliza, after a very pensive ride, and not a little pain at the State in which I left you. I trust you will exert yourself to vanquish it & will only look forward to our reunion which I shall try to make as speedy as possible. While I [am] about I shall think certainly of you and my dear children and with the tenderest sentiments. Adieu best of women   Yrs....
I was made happy My beloved Eliza by the receipt of two letters from you which gave me the delightful intelligence that you & my dear Children were well. I shall be glad to come and receive the assurance in person. This moment I came from Court & I fear I shall not be disengaged from it before Saturday. Judge of my impatience by your own. Adieu My darling Eliza I am quite well ALS , Hamilton...
On Sunday Bonaparte & wife with the Judges will dine with you. We shall be 16 in number if Morris will come. Send him the enclosed note on horseback, this Evening, that James may bring me an answer in the morning. He is promised the little horse to return. If not prevented by the cleaning of your house I hope the pleasure of seeing you tomorrow. Let the waggon as well as the Coachee come in on...
I am thus far on my journey in good health. Tomorrow by eleven oClock I hope to reach Albany. This is the third letter I have written to you since we parted. I passed last night at Doctor Bards. The young couple seemed as usual in the like circumstances happy, and the rest of the company were in good spirits. Betsey Church talked of paying a visit to day to her uncle Philip. My former letters...
I have prepared for you a Thesis on Discretion. You may need it. God bless you. Your affectionate father. Hamilton, Reminiscences James A. Hamilton, Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton: or Men and Events, at Home and Abroad, During Three Quarters of a Century (New York, 1869). , 40. In describing this letter and its enclosure, James A. Hamilton wrote: “In 1804 a student in Columbia College...
The celebrated Dean Swift calls discretion an Aldermanly virtue. With all his great and estimable qualities he possessed very little of it himself; and thus was disposed to turn it into derision. But his own experience should have taught him, that if not a splendid it is at least a very useful virtue, and ought on that account to be cultivated and cherished. Sayings of ⟨this⟩ kind by...
Since the receipt of your letter on the subject of the impeachment of the Judges, this is perhaps the first moment, that indifferent health and excessive occupation have permitted a reply. I view the attempts which are making completely in the light you do; and have very little doubt that they are in prosecution of a deliberate plan to prostrate the independence of the Judicial Department, and...
I understand that our Supreme Court has decided that the Plaintiff is liable to the Sheriff for his poundage. The agents of Mr. Sansom are therefore to pay the above. ALS , Columbia University Libraries. Hartshorne, a New York City merchant, was acting as agent for Philip Sansom, a London merchant, who was bringing suit against the New York mercantile firm of Robert Murray and Company. In 1796...
I am afraid the frequency of my requests may induce you to think me troublesome; but I do not know any one to whom I can with more confidence address myself; and if I trespass too much on your politeness I beg you will retaliate by commanding me freely in any matter in which I can render you service. When I was last at Albany, I applied to The Comptroller, Mr. Jenkins, to ascertain the amount...
I left with a Watchmaker at Albany my watch to be put in order & forgot it when I came away. I believe the name of the Watchmaker is Howal . He lives near the Court House, obliquely SouthWest. Do me the favour to get it from him and send it to me by a safe opportunity; paying the expence. Yrs.   with much esteem ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. Henry, an Albany lawyer, was...
Mr. Hughes will please to execute the above order as follows—After deducting the Costs he will pay their proportions to the respective parties except that to Joseph Caste which I will receive. ALS , Emmett Collection, MS Division, New York Public Library. Hughes, a New York City lawyer, was a master of the New York Court of Chancery. This letter concerns the case of Benjamin Taylor v Charles...
I take the liberty to ask the favour of your aid in respect to the inclosed notice from the Supreme Court of the UStates in the affair of the Schooner Peggy. It is to be delivered to the Agents of the Ship Trumball, who are Messieurs Howland and Allen and upon a copy of it an affidavit must be made before the District Judge of the UStates (who I am told resides at New London) that the original...
Albany, March 6, 1801. Acknowledges receipt of Ingraham’s letter of February 26, 1801 . Regrets that he cannot serve as Ingraham’s attorney because of unavoidable delay in Albany. ALS , Mrs. Jean Ahnfeldt, Los Altos, California. Letter not found. Ingraham was declared a bankrupt on February 19, 1801 (RG 21, Records of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York,...
Mr. Davies, who appreciates your character as he ought, having expressed a desire to be personally acquainted with you, I promised him a letter of introduction. I comply with this promise with the greater pleasure, as the impressions which this Gentleman has made upon me induce me to believe that you will be glad of the opportunity of making his acquaintance. He is Attorney of the UStates for...
You will have heared, before this reaches you, of the fluctuations and changes which have taken place in the measures of the reigning party, as to a candidate for Governor; and you will probably have also been informed that pursuant to the opinions professed by our friends, before I left New York, I had taken an open part in favour of Mr. Lansing. It is a fact to be regretted, though...
You are, I believe, acquainted with The Reverend Mr. Mason who will deliver you this. I could not let him depart without placing him under the protection of your friendship. He is in every sense a man of rare merit . Yrs. Affect. ALS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. John Mitchell Mason became pastor of the Scotch Presbyterian Church on Cedar Street in New York City in 1793. It...
I have been long very delinquent towards you, as a correspondent, and am to thank you that you have not cast me off altogether as an irretrievable reprobate. But you knew how to appreciate the causes and you have made a construction equally just and indulgent. In your last you ask my opinion about a matter delicate and important both in a public and in a personal view. I shall give it with the...
Resolved , as the sense of the Legislature, that the following amendments ought to be incorporated into the Constitution of the United States as a necessary safeguard in the choice of a President and Vice President against pernicious dissensions as the most eligible mode of obtaining a full and fair expression of the public will in such election. 1st. That Congress shall from time to time...
[ New York, January 11, 1804. On January 18, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Je n’ai recu que Ce matin, La Lettre dont Vous mavés favorisé Le 11.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, January 24, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Le 24 Janvier aussy dernier, Vous maves fait la remise.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, May 6, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “J’ai hier recu Votre Lettre du 6. mai.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, March 6, 1804. On March 22, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Je nai recu que hier, Votre Lettre du 6.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, April 10, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Vous m’aves fait La remise Le 10. avril dernier.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, September 12, 1803. On September 30, 1803, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Votre Lettre du 12, timbré du 19, ne m’est Parvenue que Le 29.” Letter not found. ]
Mr. Hamilton called at Major L’Enfant’s this Afternoon, with intent to communicate something interesting. He will be glad to see the Major, at his house, this Evening or tomorrow Morning. AL , Digges-L’Enfant-Morgan Collection, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to L’Enfant, July 27, 1801, note 2 ; L’Enfant to H, September 4, 1801 .
Three days since I received your letter of the 14th. As there is a Court sitting, I defer a particular answer to it, and drop you a line to say, that I shall certainly do every thing in my power to fulfil your wish. With regard, I am, Sir   Yr. Obed ser ALS , Digges-L’Enfant-Morgan Collection, Library of Congress. Letter not found. The New York Supreme Court met in New York City from July 21,...
[ New York, August 18, 1801. On September 4, 1801, L’Enfant wrote to Hamilton : “I received your letter of the 18th. ulto.” Letter not found. ]
New York, December 12, 1803. Discusses the contents of a letter “this morning received from Mr. Pendleton” concerning an agreement made between Henry Sands and the Bank of New York which provided for the sale of mortgaged property owned by Sands in order to pay Sands’s creditors. AL [S], Bank of New York, New York City. For background to this letter, see H to LeRoy, September 19, 1802 . The...