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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander"
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Your first letter, in a style too peremptory, made a demand, in my opinion, unprecedented and unwarrantable. My answer, pointing out the embarrassment, gave you an opportunity to take a less exceptionable course. You have not chosen to do it, but by your last letter, received this day, containing expressions indecorous and improper, you have increased the difficulties to explanation,...
We did not leave Albany till near twelve on Friday and the next day about one, I arrived here —where I found the two families in good health. The darkness of the night obliged us to come to Anchor in Haverstraw Bay. About mid-night we were alarmed with the cry of “All hands upon Deck.” You will imagine we were not slow in our obedience. No sooner were we on Deck than we perceived by a flame...
Presuming on the acquaintance, from which I derived so much pleasure during your stay in this Country, I am going to take a very great liberty. It concerns a near relation of mine, Mr. Alexander Hamilton, now a prisoner of war on parol, at Paris. His brother, from whom I have just received a letter informs me, that being upon a visit to the Continent as a Traveller, he was overtaken by the war...
New York, December 31, 1801. Sends depositions to Parsons, who is “of Counsel for the Underwriters in a case of Insurance in which my Brother in law Mr. Church is concerned.” Proposes that “these depositions … be used in evidence in any suit which may be instituted between him and your Clients.” ALS , Boston Public Library. Parsons, a Federalist lawyer from Newburyport, Massachusetts, had an...
New York, March 25, 1801. Gives opinion concerning the right of Nathanael Greene’s executors to sell lands in his estate in New York State. ALS , The Sol Feinstone Collection, Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. For background to this letter, see Wadsworth to H, August 23, 1800 .
[ New York, March 13, 1803. On March 13, 1803, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “I write your father by this opportunity.” Letter not found. ]
New York, December 9, 1803. Gives opinion concerning the effect of the French arrêt of June 20, 1803, on neutral shipping. ALS , The Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Gouverneur was a New York City merchant. For the full text of this letter and a discussion of its contents, see Goebel, Law Practice Julius Goebel, Jr., and Joseph H. Smith, eds., The Law Practice of Alexander Hamilton:...
I am vexed and chagrined, My beloved Eliza, that I cannot come out to day as I intended. I had requested a Meeting of the Manumission Society for this forenoon; but for some reason unknown to me, it is called for this Evening seven oClock. I cannot of course help attending and I have little hope that it will break up in time to make the journey this Evening. To indemnify myself, in some sort,...
Finding that a story long since propagated under circumstances, which it was expected would soon consign it to oblivion, (and by which I have been complimented at the expence of Generals Washington and La Fayette) has of late been revived and has acquired a degree of importance by being repeated in different publications as well as in Europe as America—it becomes a duty to counteract its...
I was not, My Dear Sir, insensible to the kind attention shewn me by your letter of the 30th. of November last. But till very lately the subject has been so extremely painful to me, that I have been under a necessity of flying from it as much as possible. Time and effort and occupation have at length restored the tranquillity of my mind, sufficiently to permit me to acknowlege the kindness of...
Mr. Hamilton called at Major L’Enfant’s this Afternoon, with intent to communicate something interesting. He will be glad to see the Major, at his house, this Evening or tomorrow Morning. AL , Digges-L’Enfant-Morgan Collection, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to L’Enfant, July 27, 1801, note 2 ; L’Enfant to H, September 4, 1801 .
New York, March 30, 1802. Seeks Dayton’s aid for client soliciting “the interposition of our Government with the Court of Spain for obtaining restitution of a vessel & Cargo seized in South America.” ALS , Joseph Hopkinson Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
[ New York, March 16–17, 1803. On March 16–17, 1803, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “I write your father by this oppy.” Letter not found. ]
New York, December 12, 1803. Discusses the contents of a letter “this morning received from Mr. Pendleton” concerning an agreement made between Henry Sands and the Bank of New York which provided for the sale of mortgaged property owned by Sands in order to pay Sands’s creditors. AL [S], Bank of New York, New York City. For background to this letter, see H to LeRoy, September 19, 1802 . The...
I send you some extracts from a pamphlet lately published, in reply to one written by a Gentleman of my acquaintance ( not by me as has been by some conjectured) from which I have taken out some leaves which I send you. At the request of this Gentleman I trouble you to give me some explanation respecting the suggestions which are made particularly in respect to Col Pickering, General Miller...
New York, August 21, 1802. “… Alexander Hamilton … shall pay to … Theodosius Fowler … the sum of One thousand four hundred and fifty one Dollars lawful Money aforesaid on or before the eighteenth day of May next with lawful Interest for the same from the eighteenth day of May last then the Obligation to be Void.…” DS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. For information on the contents...
I lately received a letter from you, transmitting a pamphlet. The latter, I have read with much pleasure. If party spirit admitted of candor, I should say that it was calculated to satisfy candid men of whatever party. Pains will be taken to disseminate it. You may remember that when you were last in this City, I spoke to you about some lands which I owned in the Ohio Company tracts. Inclosed...
You were probably acquainted in this Country with Colonel Toussard who will have the honor of delivering you this letter. He has filled several stations in our Military service at different periods and always with much credit to himself and advantage to the service. During our revolutionary war he lost an arm in an action in which he displayed much zeal and bravery, and to my knowlege was...
Your Protegé Buisson has addressed to me the inclosed letter. Why he did not immediately write to you I cannot tell unless it be that he is conscious he has used your politeness sufficiently, and imagines an intermediary to be hereafter necessary. Perhaps you may be able to decipher his wishes from the letter; which I confess is beyond my skill. But I understand from him in conversation that...
They call the Navy Useless. They detest it because it protected our Commerce against the depredations of France; because in place of resistance we did not sue for mercy & pay tribute? Has it not protected our Commerce, saved our merchants from ruin & enabled them to send to foreign markets with advantage the productions? Is not a navy the natural safeguard of our Country &c & Standing Army...
I am afraid the frequency of my requests may induce you to think me troublesome; but I do not know any one to whom I can with more confidence address myself; and if I trespass too much on your politeness I beg you will retaliate by commanding me freely in any matter in which I can render you service. When I was last at Albany, I applied to The Comptroller, Mr. Jenkins, to ascertain the amount...
During Yesterdays Fete, having had occasion to discharge ⟨– –⟩ recently repaired; I must ⟨–⟩ the Barrel now ⟨– – –⟩ in the Opposite Direction. I will expect you ⟨– – –⟩ immedy upon your Return to the City. your Servt Transcript furnished by Mr. Lincoln Diamant, Tarrytown, New York. Schuss was a New York City gunsmith. See “Motion Made at a Meeting of the Society of the Cincinnati,” July 4,...
I was extremely disappointed, My Dear Eliza, that the Mondays post did not bring me a letter from you. You used to keep your promises better. And you know that I should be anxious to hear of your health. If the succeeding post does not rectify the omission of the former I shall be dissatisfied and pained. I am chagrined at the prospect of being detained considerably longer than I expected. Our...
I congratulate you and myself on your victory over Brockholst. Whether your interest is much promoted by it or not is of small consequence—In the triumph of vanquishing such an enemy. That you know was your principal inducement and I know that you will be willing to pay well for it. I have been deliberating whether to charge you 200 or 100 pounds for my services in this cause. In fixing upon...
Amidst the humiliating circumstances which attend our country, all the sound part of the community must find cause of triumph in the brilliant display of talents which have been employed though without success, in resisting the follies of an infatuated administration. And your personal friends will not have much reason for mortification on account of the part you have performed in the...
New York, August 16, 1803. “The enclosed is pursuant to an arrangement between Judge Thompson & Mr. Troupe. The parties trust and hope, that you will by all means have the goodness to attend.…” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Platt, Smith Thompson, and Robert Troup had been appointed arbitrators and commissioners to settle the dispute over lands in Claverack, Columbia County, New...
New York, May 8, 1801. Gives opinion on the conditions that the executors of Nathanael Greene’s estate wish to impose on the conveyance of his New York State lands. ALS , The Sol Feinstone Collection, Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. For information concerning the contents of this letter, see Wadsworth to H, August 23, 1800 ; H to Wadsworth, March 25, 1801 .
I arrived here, my beloved, about five this afternoon. According to my first day’s journey, I ought now to be much further advanced. But some how Riddle sprained the ancle of one of his hind legs, which very much retarded my progress to day. By care and indulgence, he is much better this Evening; so that I count upon being able to reach Albany with him early on Wednesday morning. I have...
[ New York, January 11, 1804. On January 18, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Je n’ai recu que Ce matin, La Lettre dont Vous mavés favorisé Le 11.” Letter not found. ]
I have prepared for you a Thesis on Discretion. You may need it. God bless you. Your affectionate father. Hamilton, Reminiscences James A. Hamilton, Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton: or Men and Events, at Home and Abroad, During Three Quarters of a Century (New York, 1869). , 40. In describing this letter and its enclosure, James A. Hamilton wrote: “In 1804 a student in Columbia College...
[ Albany, October 4, 1801. Gives directions for a shipment of trees. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Merwin-Clayton Sales Company, January 12, 1906, Item 55. For background to this letter, see H to Elizabeth Hamilton, October 4, 1801 . Description taken from the dealer’s catalogue.
I fully intended to have dined with you to day but going to Town the two last days & forgetting that I ought to observe a regimen, I have brought back in some degree the complaint which lately annoyed me & which requires to be well watched. This must deprive me of the pleasure of seeing you. I send Schedules of the papers required of Tillier, all which have been put into my hands—the bill to...
I was in Town to day till half past one. I thank you for the delicacy which dictated your note to me. If it is indispensable the communication should be made before Monday Morning, I must receive it here. But I should think this cannot be important. On monday by Nine I shall be in Town at my house in Cæder Street No 52, where I should be glad to see you. An additional reason for preferring...
[ Grange, New York, April 26, 1804. “I would not pronounce against the power of the Directors to go into the operation you mention; but I think it liable to so much question as hardly to be advisable without the sanction of the stock holders at a general meeting. I should perceive no difficulty in their giving a gross sum out of their profits for the renewal or extention of their charter. The...
Your letter of the 12th inst. has relieved me from some apprehension. Yet it is well that it should be perfectly understood by the truly sound part of the Fœderalists, that there do in fact exist intrigues in good earnest, between several individuals not unimportant, of the Fœderal Party, and the person in question; which are bottomed upon motives & views, by no means auspicious to the real...
I will make no apology for my delay in answering your inquiry some time since made, because I could offer none which would satisfy myself. I pray you only to believe that it proceeded from any thing rather than want of respect or regard. I shall now comply with your request. The highest toned propositions, which I made in the Convention, were for a President, Senate and Judges during good...
[ New York, July 9, 1804. Nathaniel Pendleton described the seventh item on a list of ten, which were given to him after Hamilton’s death, as a “Letter to John B. Church inclosing an assignment of some debts.” Letter not found. ] See “List of Papers Given to Nathaniel Pendleton,” July 19, 1804 . See “Assignment of Debts and Grant of Power of Attorney to John B. Church,” July 9, 1804 .
To all to whom these Presents shall come, or in any wise concern. Be it known and made manifest, that we, the Subscribers, have formed a Company or limited Partnership, and do hereby associate and agree with each other, to conduct business in the manner hereinafter specified and described, by and under the name and style of the “Merchants’ Bank,” and we do hereby mutually covenant, declare and...
These sums having been received since my engagement & no services rendered I consider them as forming part of my debts. Franklin & Robinson 50 James Amory 20 D Ludlow & Co 50 Wilmerding 30 Murdock Masterson & Co 20 Steven Ray & David Dill 25 Scott & Tremaine 20 ADS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. This document is the tenth and final item on the
The inclosed was put into my hands by Capt Du Buisson, when lately I was about to make a journey to the City of Washington, with the suggestion that you had desired it as a voucher for his right to receive 3000 francs from the Armateurs of the Peggy and which sum he informed me you would be willing to pay out of funds in deposit with you on account of that Vessel and her Cargo. The...
Mr. Hughes will please to execute the above order as follows—After deducting the Costs he will pay their proportions to the respective parties except that to Joseph Caste which I will receive. ALS , Emmett Collection, MS Division, New York Public Library. Hughes, a New York City lawyer, was a master of the New York Court of Chancery. This letter concerns the case of Benjamin Taylor v Charles...
He [Hamilton] confessed with seeming sincerity, he felt little zeal on the present occasion. He could prove that to repeal the judiciary law and to with-hold the salaries of the judges, would be an infringement of the constitution. He did not intend, however, to dwell on the constitutionality of the question. He allowed that gentlemen might have different opinions concerning it. His primary...
[ New York, January 24, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Le 24 Janvier aussy dernier, Vous maves fait la remise.” Letter not found. ]
I was much relieved, My Dear Eliza by the receipt yesterday morning of your letter of Monday last. How it came to be so long delayed, I am unable to conjecture. But the delay gave much uneasiness in consequence of the imperfect state of health in which I had left you. Thank God you were better—for indeed my Eliza you are very essential to me. Your virtues more and more endear you to me and...
Grange [ New York ], September 19, 1802 . Informs LeRoy of an arrangement he has concluded with Henry Sands to assign Sands’s mortgage on lots in Brooklyn to the Bank of New York, which, in turn, would sell the mortgaged property and use the proceeds to discharge Comfort Sands’s debts. States: “Going tomorrow morning to attend the W Chester Circuit which may occasion an absence of three or...
[ New York, May 6, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “J’ai hier recu Votre Lettre du 6. mai.” Letter not found. ]
Mr. Davies, who appreciates your character as he ought, having expressed a desire to be personally acquainted with you, I promised him a letter of introduction. I comply with this promise with the greater pleasure, as the impressions which this Gentleman has made upon me induce me to believe that you will be glad of the opportunity of making his acquaintance. He is Attorney of the UStates for...
In the Name of God Amen! I Alexander Hamilton of the City of New York Counsellor at Law do make this my last Will and Testament as follows. First I appoint John B Church Nicholas Fish and Nathaniel Pendleton of the City aforesaid Esquires to be Executors and Trustees of this my Will and I devise to them their heirs and Assigns, as joint Tenants and not as Tenants in common, All my Estate real...
Reasons why it is desirable that Mr. Lansing rather than Col. Burr should succeed. 1. Col Burr has steadily pursued the ⟨track⟩ of democratic policies. This he has done either from principle or from calculation . If the former he is not likely now to change his plan, when the fœderalists are prostrate and their enemies predominent. If the latter, he will certainly not at this time relinquish...
I have just arrived here and shall stay till tomorrow. It has always appeared to me that the ground on which our Orchard stands is much too moist. To cure this a ditch round it would be useful, perhaps with a sunken fence as a guard. But this last may be considered at a future time. If you can obtain one or two more labourers, it may be adviseable to cut a ditch round the Orchard—three feet...