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[ New York, November, 1800. The description of this letter in the dealer’s catalogue reads: “deals with legal matters.” Letter not found. ] LS , sold by Goodspeed’s Bookstore, Boston, February, 1942. For background to this letter, see H, Cooper, and Ogden to FitzSimons, Herman LeRoy, William Tilghman, and Matthew Pearce, October 17, 1800, note 1 ; November 17, 1800 . FitzSimons, Higbee, and...
This is the fifth letter, Madam, that ⟨I shall⟩ have written to you, without yet having had ⟨the pleasure⟩ of knowing that one has reached your hands. This ⟨situation⟩ is matter of no small regret to us, and it would be still more perplexing and painful did we not understand th⟨at⟩ others of your friends are in a like situation. Being a common misfortune, we cannot impute it to any...
I am just arrived here after a very comfortable journey. Our intention is to reach Albany on Wednesday morning, from which place I shall immediately write to you. I am less and less pleased with the prospect of so long a separation from my beloved family & you may depend shall shorten it as much as possible. Dumphey had planted the Tulip Trees in a row along the outer fence of the Garden in...
Mr. Hamilton called at Major L’Enfant’s this Afternoon, with intent to communicate something interesting. He will be glad to see the Major, at his house, this Evening or tomorrow Morning. AL , Digges-L’Enfant-Morgan Collection, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to L’Enfant, July 27, 1801, note 2 ; L’Enfant to H, September 4, 1801 .
[ New York, 1801. The dealer’s catalogue description of this letter reads: “in regard to the case of the Ringwood Iron Co.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Goodspeed’s Book Store, Boston, Catalogue 101, Item 1643. Troup was the attorney for the trustees of the American Iron Company. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Philip Schuyler to H, August 31, 1795 . See also H...
Albany, March 6, 1801. Acknowledges receipt of Ingraham’s letter of February 26, 1801 . Regrets that he cannot serve as Ingraham’s attorney because of unavoidable delay in Albany. ALS , Mrs. Jean Ahnfeldt, Los Altos, California. Letter not found. Ingraham was declared a bankrupt on February 19, 1801 (RG 21, Records of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York,...
[ Albany, March 8, 1801. On March 9, 1801 , Hamilton wrote to his wife: “Yesterday, My beloved Eliza, I wrote you.” Letter not found. ]
Yesterday, My beloved Eliza, I wrote you by water to the care of a Capt Boyed. I in that letter informed you of my painful detention here by the slow progress of the Court and of my extreme anxiety to be with you. Your Sister Peggy had a better night last night than for three weeks past and is much easier this morning. Yet her situation is such as only to authorise a glimmering of hope. Adieu...
The Senate has refused on account of the interference with other business to hear any more causes this session; so that were it not for the situation of your Sister Peggy, her request that I would stay a few days longer and the like request of your father and mother, I could now return to you. But how can I resist these motives for continuing a while longer? Things must change this week but at...
On Saturday, My Dear Eliza, your sister took leave of her sufferings and friends, I trust, to find repose and happiness in a better country. Viewing all that she had endured for so long a time, I could not but feel a relief in the termination of the scene. She was sensible to the last and resigned to the important change. Your father and mother are now calm. All is as well as it can be; except...
To the Electors of the State of New-York Fellow-Citizens! We lately addressed you on the subject of the ensuing election for Governor and Lieutenant-Governor—recommending to your support Stephen Van Rensselaer and James Watson . Since that we have seen the address of our opponents, urging your preference of George Clinton and Jeremiah Van Rensselaer. The whole tenor of our address carries with...
We did not leave Albany till near twelve on Friday and the next day about one, I arrived here —where I found the two families in good health. The darkness of the night obliged us to come to Anchor in Haverstraw Bay. About mid-night we were alarmed with the cry of “All hands upon Deck.” You will imagine we were not slow in our obedience. No sooner were we on Deck than we perceived by a flame...
New York, March 25, 1801. Gives opinion concerning the right of Nathanael Greene’s executors to sell lands in his estate in New York State. ALS , The Sol Feinstone Collection, Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. For background to this letter, see Wadsworth to H, August 23, 1800 .
After which General Hamilton addressed the meeting in one of those eloquent and impressive speeches which distinguish this superior man. He took a general review of the state of the country since the revolution—examined the conduct of the two parties which have existed in it—shewed that it was to the Federal party exclusively that we owe the unexampled prosperity which we have hitherto...
“… General Hamilton at one of the largest & most respectable election meetings ever witnessed here made an election speech that electrified the whole federal mass. It was one of the chef d’ouvres of this great man! For strength of reasoning & at the same time for impressive & sublime eloquence it surpassed what in all probab[il]ty has ever been delivered in this city. He began with the...
They call the Navy Useless. They detest it because it protected our Commerce against the depredations of France; because in place of resistance we did not sue for mercy & pay tribute? Has it not protected our Commerce, saved our merchants from ruin & enabled them to send to foreign markets with advantage the productions? Is not a navy the natural safeguard of our Country &c & Standing Army...
The general commenced by observing—That it had all along been his most sincere and ardent wish, that the two parties should meet amicably together, and discuss the merits of their respective claims to the public support and approbation—That the friends of Mr. Clinton, and those of Mr. Van Rensselaer should each agree to appoint a certain number of men of talents, and in presence of their...
New York, May 8, 1801. Gives opinion on the conditions that the executors of Nathanael Greene’s estate wish to impose on the conveyance of his New York State lands. ALS , The Sol Feinstone Collection, Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. For information concerning the contents of this letter, see Wadsworth to H, August 23, 1800 ; H to Wadsworth, March 25, 1801 .
[ New York, May 20, 1801. On May 26, 1801, Madison wrote to Hamilton : “I have received your letter of the 20th.” Letter not found. ]
Mr. Davies, who appreciates your character as he ought, having expressed a desire to be personally acquainted with you, I promised him a letter of introduction. I comply with this promise with the greater pleasure, as the impressions which this Gentleman has made upon me induce me to believe that you will be glad of the opportunity of making his acquaintance. He is Attorney of the UStates for...
Mr. Davies, District Attorney for Kentucke being about to make a visit to your City, I with pleasure embrace the opportunity of introducing him to you. He was presented to me by Chief Justice Marshall and appears to me entitled to all the attention due to a man of sense and merit. With great esteem   I am Dr Sir   Yr Obed ser ALS , Columbia University Libraries.
You will remember that a considerable time since I gave you an opinion on a variety of matters arising upon your uncles Will. For this I have received no compensation; never that I remember having presented an account. I will therefore thank you to send me fifty Dollars for this service. As I am building I am endeavouring to collect my outstanding claims. With esteem I am Sir   Yr Obed ser ALS...
… or otherwise I have no data to judge. I can only say they were entrusted to persons whom all the world would pronounce equal to the task; and that I took the best of all precautions, to ensure their care as well as their fidelity, which was to connect their interest with yours. If the purchase from Mark shall not answer expectation, and has been attended with an additional burthen not...
The original of your letter of the 9th. of April never came to hand. The copy in that of the 9th. of June arrived here while I was on a circuit, so that I did not receive it till a few days ago. It is the practice on the admission of honorary members to present them with diplomas. But there are no blanks in my possession and very few in that of the officers of the Society of this state. These,...
This Indenture made the first day of July in the year of our lord One thousand Eight hundred and one between Alexander Hamilton of the City of New York counsellor at law of the first part and Richard Harrison of the same City and Aaron Ogden of Elizabeth Town in the State of New Jersey, counsellors at law and Trustees for Louis and Mary Le Guen pursuant to their Antenuptial Contract of the...
Know all Men by These Presents that I Alexander Hamilton of the City of New York Counsellor at Law am held and firmly bound to Richard Harrison of the same City and Aaron Ogden of Elizabeth Town in New Jersey Counsellors at law in the sum of Ten thousand Dollars lawful money of the United States of America to be paid to them as Trustees for Louis and Mary LeGuen according to their Antenuptial...
Three days since I received your letter of the 14th. As there is a Court sitting, I defer a particular answer to it, and drop you a line to say, that I shall certainly do every thing in my power to fulfil your wish. With regard, I am, Sir   Yr. Obed ser ALS , Digges-L’Enfant-Morgan Collection, Library of Congress. Letter not found. The New York Supreme Court met in New York City from July 21,...
You are, I believe, acquainted with The Reverend Mr. Mason who will deliver you this. I could not let him depart without placing him under the protection of your friendship. He is in every sense a man of rare merit . Yrs. Affect. ALS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. John Mitchell Mason became pastor of the Scotch Presbyterian Church on Cedar Street in New York City in 1793. It...
[ New York, August 18, 1801. On September 4, 1801, L’Enfant wrote to Hamilton : “I received your letter of the 18th. ulto.” Letter not found. ]
I am vexed and chagrined, My beloved Eliza, that I cannot come out to day as I intended. I had requested a Meeting of the Manumission Society for this forenoon; but for some reason unknown to me, it is called for this Evening seven oClock. I cannot of course help attending and I have little hope that it will break up in time to make the journey this Evening. To indemnify myself, in some sort,...
I send you some extracts from a pamphlet lately published, in reply to one written by a Gentleman of my acquaintance ( not by me as has been by some conjectured) from which I have taken out some leaves which I send you. At the request of this Gentleman I trouble you to give me some explanation respecting the suggestions which are made particularly in respect to Col Pickering, General Miller...
[ New York, September, 1801. On November 21, 1801, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter dated in September came lately to my hands.” Letter not found. ] Washington, a nephew of George Washington, was appointed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States on December 20, 1798, and served until his death in 1829.
I was extremely disappointed, My Dear Eliza, that the Mondays post did not bring me a letter from you. You used to keep your promises better. And you know that I should be anxious to hear of your health. If the succeeding post does not rectify the omission of the former I shall be dissatisfied and pained. I am chagrined at the prospect of being detained considerably longer than I expected. Our...
This morning, My beloved Eliza, I arrived here to pay a visit to your father, in the interval of the postponement of our causes, as I mentioned in a letter which I wrote you on Friday from Claverack. Your father’s wound is much better and your mother in good health. Your sisters are both on a visit to Rensselaer; but expected back to day or tomorrow. In the morning I return to Claverack. I am...
[ Albany, October 4, 1801. Gives directions for a shipment of trees. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Merwin-Clayton Sales Company, January 12, 1906, Item 55. For background to this letter, see H to Elizabeth Hamilton, October 4, 1801 . Description taken from the dealer’s catalogue.
I have reached this place, my dear Eliza, after a very pensive ride, and not a little pain at the State in which I left you. I trust you will exert yourself to vanquish it & will only look forward to our reunion which I shall try to make as speedy as possible. While I [am] about I shall think certainly of you and my dear children and with the tenderest sentiments. Adieu best of women   Yrs....
I wrote to my beloved from Rhinebeck . Yesterday Evening I arrived here and found your family generally well. Your father’s leg is not quite cured but it continues in a good way & Stringer promises that it will soon be perfectly sound. I have not, myself, been in better health for a great while, and all I want to complete my happiness is that your health should be restored. Pray take care of...
I was much relieved, My Dear Eliza by the receipt yesterday morning of your letter of Monday last. How it came to be so long delayed, I am unable to conjecture. But the delay gave much uneasiness in consequence of the imperfect state of health in which I had left you. Thank God you were better—for indeed my Eliza you are very essential to me. Your virtues more and more endear you to me and...
I take the liberty to ask the favour of your aid in respect to the inclosed notice from the Supreme Court of the UStates in the affair of the Schooner Peggy. It is to be delivered to the Agents of the Ship Trumball, who are Messieurs Howland and Allen and upon a copy of it an affidavit must be made before the District Judge of the UStates (who I am told resides at New London) that the original...
The Prince Bailli Ruspoli of the order of Malta, who will deliver you this letter was strongly recommended to me by Mr. King. He appears to me a very Gentlemanlike respectable man. As such I ask for him your civilities. Among these you can do nothing more grateful to him than to give him a letter of Introduction to some friend of yours at Washington. Adieu My Dr. Mac   Yrs. ever ALS , Montague...
Instead of delivering a speech to the House of Congress, at the opening of the present session, the President has thought fit to transmit a Message . Whether this has proceeded from pride or from humility, from a temperate love of reform, or from a wild spirit of innovation, is submitted to the conjectures of the curious. A single observation shall be indulged—since all agree, that he is...
The next most prominent feature in the Message, is the proposal to abandon at once all the internal revenue of the country. The motives avowed for this astonishing scheme, are that “there is reasonable ground of confidence that this part of the revenue may now be safely dispensed with—that the remaining sources will be sufficient to provide for the support of government, to pay the interest of...
Had our laws been less provident than they have been, yet must it give us a very humble idea of the talents of our President as a statesman, to find him embarrassed between an absolute abandonment of revenue, and an inconvenient accumulation of treasure. Pursuing the doctrine professed by his sect , that our public debt is a national curse which cannot too promptly be removed, and adhering to...
It is a matter of surprise to observe a proposition to diminish the revenue, associated with intimations which appear to contemplate war. The suggestions in the Message respecting the Barbary States, plainly enough imply, that treaties are found to be too feeble cords to bind them; and that a resort to coercive means will probably be requisite to enforce a greater sense of justice towards us....
[ New York, December 28, 1801. On Saturday, January 2, 1802, Schuyler wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of Mondays date only reached me this Morning.” Letter not found. ]
In the rage for change, or under the stimulus of a deep-rooted animosity against the former administrations, or for the sake of gaining popular favor by a profuse display of extraordinary zeal for economy, even our judiciary system has not passed unassailed. The attack here is not so open as that on the revenue; but when we are told that the states individually have “ principal care of our...
New York, December 31, 1801. Sends depositions to Parsons, who is “of Counsel for the Underwriters in a case of Insurance in which my Brother in law Mr. Church is concerned.” Proposes that “these depositions … be used in evidence in any suit which may be instituted between him and your Clients.” ALS , Boston Public Library. Parsons, a Federalist lawyer from Newburyport, Massachusetts, had an...
In answer to the observations in the last number it may perhaps be said that the Message meant nothing more than to condemn the recent multiplication of Federal Courts, and to bring them back to their original organization: considering it as adequate to all the purposes of the Constitution; to all the ends of justice and policy. Towards forming a right judgment on this subject, it may be...
The next exceptionable feature in the Message, is the proposal to abolish all restriction on naturalization, arising from a previous residence. In this the President is not more at variance with the concurrent maxims of all commentators on popular governments, than he is with himself. The Notes on Virginia are in direct contradiction to the Message, and furnish us with strong reasons against...
Resuming the subject of our last paper we proceed to trace still farther, the consequences that must result from a too unqualified admission of foreigners, to an equal participation in our civil, and political rights. The safety of a republic depends essentially on the energy of a common National sentiment; on a uniformity of principles and habits; on the exemption of the citizens from foreign...