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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Hamilton, Elizabeth
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    • Jefferson Presidency
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    • Hamilton, Alexander

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Hamilton, Elizabeth" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Hamilton, Alexander"
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I was much relieved, My Dear Eliza by the receipt yesterday morning of your letter of Monday last. How it came to be so long delayed, I am unable to conjecture. But the delay gave much uneasiness in consequence of the imperfect state of health in which I had left you. Thank God you were better—for indeed my Eliza you are very essential to me. Your virtues more and more endear you to me and...
I have just arrived here and shall stay till tomorrow. It has always appeared to me that the ground on which our Orchard stands is much too moist. To cure this a ditch round it would be useful, perhaps with a sunken fence as a guard. But this last may be considered at a future time. If you can obtain one or two more labourers, it may be adviseable to cut a ditch round the Orchard—three feet...
I am thus far on my journey in good health. Tomorrow by eleven oClock I hope to reach Albany. This is the third letter I have written to you since we parted. I passed last night at Doctor Bards. The young couple seemed as usual in the like circumstances happy, and the rest of the company were in good spirits. Betsey Church talked of paying a visit to day to her uncle Philip. My former letters...
I was made happy My beloved Eliza by the receipt of two letters from you which gave me the delightful intelligence that you & my dear Children were well. I shall be glad to come and receive the assurance in person. This moment I came from Court & I fear I shall not be disengaged from it before Saturday. Judge of my impatience by your own. Adieu My darling Eliza I am quite well ALS , Hamilton...
I arrived here, my beloved, about five this afternoon. According to my first day’s journey, I ought now to be much further advanced. But some how Riddle sprained the ancle of one of his hind legs, which very much retarded my progress to day. By care and indulgence, he is much better this Evening; so that I count upon being able to reach Albany with him early on Wednesday morning. I have...
Captain Church, My Dear Betsy, has just arrived & brings me favourable accounts of your journey hitherto and prospects. It is a great comfort to me and I hope will not be marred by bad weather; so that you may all speedily arrive and without too much fatigue to sooth and console your affected Father. Now you are all gone and I have no effort to make to keep up your spirits, my distress on his...
I thank you My Betsy for your letter from Fish Kill. I hope the subsequent part of your journey has proved less fatiguing than the two first days. I have anticipated with dread your interview with your father. I hope your prudence and fortitude have been a match for your sensibility. Remember that the main object of visit is to console him; that his own burthen is sufficient, and that it would...
I am here my beloved Betsy with my two little boys John & William who will be my bed fellows to night. The day I have passed was as agreeable as it could be in your absence; but you need not be told how much difference your presence would have made. Things are now going on here pretty and pretty briskly. I am making some innovations which I am sure you will approve. The remainder of the...
This morning my b⟨e⟩loved Eliza I leave Albany for C⟨lav⟩erack, my health greatly mended ⟨a⟩nd I hope to make but a short stay there. My plan is to go to Poughkepsie and there embark. I shall be glad to find that my dear little Philip is weaned, if circumstances have rendered it prudent. It is of importance to me to rest quietly in your bosom. Adieu my beloved. Kiss all the Children for me....
I arrived here this day, in about as good health as I left home though somewhat fatigued. There are some things necessary to be done which I omitted mentioning to you. I wish the Carpenters to make and insert two Chimnies for ventilating the Ice-House, each about two feet Square & four feet long half above and half below the ground—to have a cap on the top sloping downwards so that the rain...