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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Greene, Nathanael"
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The peculiar situation of American affairs renders it necessary to adopt every measure that will engage people in the service. The danger and hardships that those are subject to who engage in the service, more than those who do not, is obvious to every body which has the least Acquaintance with service, tis that which makes it so difficult to recruit. The large force that is coming against...
I have just receivd your favor of the 26th of May in answer to mine of the 24th. You must not expect me to be a very exact correspondent, my circumstances will not always admit of it. When I have opportunity I will write you with freedom if any information I can give you should be of service I shall be amply paid. I know your time is too precious to be spent in Answering Letters; but a line...
Your Favour of the second Instant has lain by me, I suppose these Eighteen days, but I fear I shall often have occasion to make Apologies for Such omissions, which will never happen from Want of Respect, but I fear very often for Want of Time. Your Reasoning, to prove the Equity, and the Policy of making Provision for the Unfortunate Officer, or soldier, is extreamly just, and cannot be...
I received your Letter of the 22d. of June, if it was necessary for you to Apologise for not writing sooner it is necessary also for me. But as the express conditions of my corresponding with you was to write when I had time and leave you to answer at your leisure, I think an Apology is unnecessary on either side. But I can Assure you, as you did me, that it is not for want of respect that...
Your Favour of the 14 of July is before me. I am happy to find your Sentiments concerning the Rewards of the Army, and the Promotion of Officers So nearly agreable to mine. I wish the general sense here was more nearly agreable to them. Time I hope will introduce a proper sense of Justice in those Cases where it may for Want of Knowledge and Experience be wanting. The New England Collonells,...
It is a long time since I wrote to you, or you to me, who stands in debt upon the schore of Letters I cannot tell therefore I shall begin anew if you have time and inclination you will give it an answer if not—I shall consider it as the Ladies do their Visits after Marriage, if theres no return the acquaintance drops. I believe you are pretty well convinced of the truth of the observation I...
I had, last Evening the Pleasure of yours of March 3. by your Brother, to whom in his Business to this Place I shall give all the Assistance in my Power. In whose favour the Ballance of Letters lies, I cant Say: but if I am in debt, in Point of Numbers it must be because Some of my Remittances have miscarried. I am not yet entirely convinced, that We are playing a desperate Game, tho I must...
I have neither seen nor heard of any Resolution of Congress approving or disproving of the Laboratory being fixed at Springfield. If the Congress approves thereof it will be necessary for them to say so there being now an Order for it’s being fixed at Brookfield and the Council of the Massachusets State commissioned to provide the materials for the erection of the necessary Buildings at that...
In considering a Letter from the General, sometime ago, in the Board of War, it was agreed to report to Congress a Resolution, approving of the Laboratory at Sprin g field, and such a Report was made, but upon some Opposition to it, it was ordered to lye on the Table, where it has lain ever since. I will, move to have it taken up and determined. Some Gentlemen will oppose it, par­ ticularly...
The Enemy made an attempt to surprise General Lincoln. This morning they advanced by three divisions. One crossed the Rarotan about a mile above Head Quarters—the second division came up in front of the Town—the third to the left of the Town and crossed the River cald Boundbrook. Besides these three divisions there was a Corps of de reservs commanded by General Mathews. The Padroles and Guards...
Your favor of April 22d. came to hand a few days since. General Lincoln is deservedly acquited from any blame. It is as you observe impossible to guard against the intrigues of the Tories and the Negligence of the Militia. However I hope with you that few such surprises will take place. I most sincerely lament the great inattention and indifference that appears among the People in general...
Yours of the 27th of April I am to acknowledge. I cannot concur with you in Sentiment because the Enimy did not go to Philadelphia last December that they had no intention then or since of going there. I am of opinion if the Enemy could have got over the Delaware immediately after our Army crosd it, it would have been agreeable to their wishes. Had they effected it before the Junction of our...
Yours of the 2d Instant, came duly to hand. The Indifference of the People about recruiting the Army, is a Circumstance, which ought to make Us, consider what are the Causes of it. It is not, merely the Melancholly, arising from the unfortunate Events of the last Campaign, but the Small Pox, and above all the unhappy State of our Finances, which occasion this Evil. There are other...
Yours of the 7th. was brought me this Morning. My Meaning was that if the Conduct of our Army, had depended on me, I should have taken more Pains to have obtained exact Information of the Enemies Numbers, and our own, and should have considered every Indication of the Enemies Intentions of coming to Philadelphia more particularly. Altho, there is no doubt that Congress have Authority to direct...
During the civil Wars in Rome, in the Time of Sylla, and young Marius, after the Death of the Elder Marius, Sylla commanded one Army against Mithridates King of Pontus, and Fimbria another. Both were in Arms against the Same foreign Enemy: but Sylla and Fimbria were equally Enemies to each other, commanding different Armies in the Service of different Parties at Rome, which were disputing...
I receiv’d a letter from you some days since. I have it not with me, and therefore cannot be very particular in the Answer. I re­ member you lament the general corruption of manners, and the increase of vicious habits that prevail in the Army; It is a serious truth, and much to be lamented; I know of nothing that a people can receive in exchange, for the loss of their Morals that is an...
Yours of 28 Ultimo is before me. It is certain that Religion and Morality, have no less obligation upon Armies, than upon Cities and contribute no less to the Happiness of Soldiers than of Citizens. There is one Principle of Religion, which has contributed vastly to the Excellence of Armies, who had very little else of Religion or Morality, the Principle I mean is the Sacred obligation of...
I never before took hold of a Pen, to write to my Friend General Green, without Pleasure, but I think myself obliged to do it now upon a Subject that gives me a great deal of Pain. The Three Letters from, the Generals Sullivan, Green and Knox, have interrupted the Deliberations of Congress, and given many of the Members of it much Uneasiness. They thought themselves bound, in Honour and...
Give me Leave, by the Opportunity of the Viscount de Noailles, to take this Method of reviving a Correspondence, which has been interupted almost three Years, but was one of the most pleasing I ever had. It is unnecessary to say any thing of the Expedition with which this Letter is intended to go, because I hope it will reveal itself to You, in Accounts which will make themselves heard and...
Our correspondence has been long broken off. I had the honor of a line from you by the Count de Noel; but I was at a loss to tell whether I was indebted to you or to him for it. However in that letter you express a wish to renew our correspondence. I should have readily complied with your desire, but as the correspondence had droped from your disinclination and not mine, and as my situation at...
In obedience to a vote of the Standing Committee of the Washington Society I have the honor to transmit to you the enclosed Card, and to request that you will honor the Society with your presence on the ensuing Anniversary of American Independence. With respect, / your most obt Servt— MHi : Adams Papers.
Chester [ Pennsylvania ] August 1, 1777. Orders Greene to hold men in readiness to march and to give the necessary orders to quartermaster general and commissary general respecting provisions and forage. States that British fleet has departed from the Delaware. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Although H’s crossed-out signature can be seen on the draft, this...
We have to request, you will order a couple of very good teams to be got ready to proceed to the enemy’s lines for General Lee’s baggage. He is to come out on parole, on Sunday morning. You will judge when they ought to set out from here—suppose tomorrow noon, so as to get in the neighbourhood of Vandeering’s Mill by tomorrow night. When they are ready to set out tomorrow let them make report...
[ Valley Forge ] May 5, 1778 . Reviews situation in Europe and discusses possible enemy movements. Df , in writing of H, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress.
I am sadly distressed for want of a good saddle &c; and such is my situation, that I have no opportunity of procuring for myself. The one I got by your order the other day was of a coarser kind that would only do for my servant. As you are in the way of procuring matters of this kind, you will oblige me much, if you will give orders for purchasing a good saddle bridle holsters &c. for me....
[ Valley Forge ] May 17, 1778 . Instructs Greene to prepare for possible movement of Army and to set up magazines along routes to North River. Df , in writings of Richard Kidder Meade and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Valley Forge ] June 8, 1778 . Instructs Greene to find a new camp site. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
White Plains [ New York ] September 14, 1778 . States that clothing is to be forwarded from Boston to the Army. Asks Greene to cooperate with Major General William Heath to assure safe and quick delivery of clothing. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Fredericksburg [ New York ] September 22, 1778 . States that provisions for the French fleet have not arrived. Asks Greene to see “that every possible expedient may be embraced to promote” the forwarding of supplies. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress; LS , in the handwriting of H, Bibliothèque Municipale, Lille, France.
His Excellency requests you will direct a couple sets of tools provided and sent to General McDougall to blow up rocks which greatly impede his carting &c. I am Sir   Yr. Most Obedt ALS , Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.