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    • Genet, Edmé Jacques
    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Genet, Edmé Jacques" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 31-40 of 62 sorted by date (descending)
Vous avés craint d’importuner M. le Comte de Vergennes et vous m’avés fait l’honeur de vous addresser à moi pour savoir ce que vous devès penser de differens bruits que les anglois se sont attachés à répandre. Je suis infiniment flatté de la marque de confiance que vous avés bien voulu me donner mais j’ai cru devoir mettre votre lettre sous les yeux de ministre. Il m’a chargé de vous assurer...
Hesitating to bother the Count de Vergennes, you have done me the honor of addressing me in order to determine what to think of the var­ ious rumors that the English have taken upon themselves to circulate. I am greatly flattered by this mark of confidence that you have had the goodness to bestow on me, but thought that I should place your letter before the minister. He has directed me to...
Whether it is that the Art of political Lying is better understood in England than in any other Country, or whether it is more practised there than elsewhere, or whether it is accidental that they have more Success in making their Fictions gain Credit in the World, I know not. But it is certain that every Winter, since the Commencement of the present War with America, and indeed for some Years...
I have the Honour to transmit you, three Letters, received by the Marquiss de la Fayette. I send you the Letters from Mr. Adams and Mr. Lee that you may know their Sentiments. All that is said of Mr. me, in both these Letters I hope you will omit. They are only Compliments, and I fancy Mistakes. What is said also, of General Sullivan in Mr. Adams’s Letter should also be omitted. And what is...
The resolve of Congress of the 10 October, that you have inserted in your No. 62 is another Forgery. It has internal Marks of it enough. 1. Congress are not so much allarmed. They know the Ennemy have not the Power, tho they very well know they have the Will to do the Mischief. 2. Congress, would never recommend the building of such Hutts. There are Houses enough in the Country to receive the...
J’ai lu à M. le Comte de Vergennes ce qui concerne M. le Comte d’Estaing, dans le billet dont vous m’avés honoré. Il m’a recommandé d’en faire mention dans mon Journal. Mais ce sera pour le numéro d’après celui qui paroitra demain. J’y ai mis une piece anglois—Signée Fire and Sword qui vous amusera. Je suis avec respect Monsieur Votre très humble et très obéissant Serviteur, Je veillerai sur...
I read to Count Vergennes that which concerns the Count d’Estaing in the note with which you honored me. He recommended that I mention it in my journal. But it will have to appear in the number after that which will appear tomorrow. I have also included an English piece—signed Fire and Sword, which should amuse you. I am, with respect, sir, your very humble and very obedient servant, I am...
As many Gentlemen may apprehend that one is exposed to a shortage of Provisions, especially of Bread in America, from the Difficulty which the French Fleet found at Boston, to obtain a Supply, especially of Bread, I beg Leave to suggest to you, an Observation or two upon that Subject. It would be Sufficient to Say, that the Comte D’Destaing, did, in Fact obtain, a Sufficient Quantity, altho...
M. Adams is very Sorry, it is not in his Power to Send Monsieur Genet a Copy of the Manifesto of Congress. He lent the only Copy he had to Mr. Lee, who promised, Yesterday, to send a Copy to M. Genet, this Morning. M. A. gave to Monsieur Garnier a Translation of it into French done by a young Gentleman here, which Mr. Garnier has probably sent. I have Seen, in a Virginia News Paper, an Answer...
I had last Night, very late your Card, respecting Mathews. I cannot recollect that any Thing was ever done in Congress, respecting him or his Conspiracy. I remember too have heard of the Transaction at the Time, but it was not an affair of sufficient Moment to excite any extensive Allarm, or make any extensive Impression; and I believe it was thought so little of, as never to have been sent to...