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Mr. and Mrs. Adams present their Compliments to Dr. Franklin and hope to have the Honour of his company to day at Dinner, with his Grandson Mr. Bache. They also beg the Favour of him to lend them the Assistance of one of his servants this morning if he can without Inconvenience as they are so unlucky as to have both their Men servants confined to their Chambers by very serious Sickness. RC in...
Mrs. Adams’es Respectfull Compliments to Dr. Franklin, is much obliged to him for the oil he was so kind as to send her, and is very sorry that his indisposition deprived her of the Honour of his company to dinner. Mrs. Adams takes the Liberty of recommending a Sedan Chair, by which the inconvenience arising from a Carriage might be avoided. RC ( PU : Franklin, Papers The Papers of Benjamin...
Printed: Franklin, Papers The Papers of Benjamin Franklin , ed. Leonard W. Labaree, William B. Willcox (from vol. 15), and others, New Haven, 1959– . , 16:222–224. For the circumstances of the committee’s appointment and its correspondence with Franklin, see the preceding document . Printed ( Franklin, Papers The Papers of Benjamin Franklin , ed. Leonard W. Labaree, William B. Willcox (from...
The Bearer Mr. Measam was a Merchant of good Reputation at Montreal; but having engag’d warmly in the American Cause, has been oblig’d to abandon that Country, to the great Detriment of his Affairs. He was appointed by Gen. Wooster a Commissary of Stores there; and apprehending Such an Officer to be at this time necessary in our Northern Army, he has apply’d to Congress for a Continuance in...
The delegates of the United States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pensylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to all who shall see these presents send greeting. Whereas a trade upon equal terms between the subjects of his most Christian majesty the king of France and the...
We have the Honour to acquaint your Excellency, that Mr. Adams, appointed by the Congress to replace Mr. Deane in the Commission here, is safely arrived, and purposes to wait upon you as soon as recovered a little from the Fatigue of his Voyage. The Ship in which he came is a Frigate of 30 Guns, belonging to the Congress. In her Passage she took a large Ship from London to New York, with a...
Passy, 13 April 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:52 . In replying to Mercklé’s letter of 26 March ( Cal. Franklin Papers, A.P.S. I. Minis Hays, comp., Calendar of the Papers of Benjamin Franklin in the Library of the American Philosophical Society , Philadelphia, 1908; 5 vols. ,...
We duely received your Letter, dated at Bourdeaux the 1st. Instant, and congratulate you, on your Safe Arrival, as well as on your good Fortune in taking, the Ship Martha, which We wish Safe to Port. We approve of your Zeal and Industry in taking upon you to get the Frigate, as far in Readiness as possible, for the Sea, during the Absence of Captain Palmes. As the Number of your Men, has been...
Bordeaux, 14 April 1778. RC ( PPAmP : Franklin Papers). Bondfield, still unaware that JA was at Paris, gave general shipping information, noted Capt. Tucker’s exertions to prepare the Boston for sea, and commented on the stagnation of Franco-American trade that would continue “until War is declared or Peace is establish’d.” RC ( PPAmP : Franklin Papers).
We have received a Complaint from the remaining Part of your Officers and Crew, of an unfair distribution of Prize Money by Mr. Hodge. To prevent any Such Complaints in future, We desire that you will put your Prizes into the Hands of Messieurs Gardoqui at Bilboa, and into those of the Principal Merchant at Cadiz or Corogne Coruña , directing them to make a Speedy Distribution of the...
By sundry Letters from Merchants of Bourdeaux and Nantes, we are inform’d, that many Adventures to America are discouraged by the high Price of Insurance, and the Number of Captures made by the English, which together have an Operation almost equal to an Embargo; so that the Commerce which might be so advantageous, to both Countries, by supplying their mutual Wants, is obstructed, and the...
We have the Honour of acquainting your Excellency, that the United States of North America, being now an Independant Power, and acknowledged as such by this Court, a Treaty of Amity and Commerce is compleated between France and the Said States, of which we shall speedily send your Excellency a Copy, to be communicated if you think proper to their High Mightinesses, for whom, the United States,...
We had this Morning the Honour of receiving your Excellency’s Letter of the 13. Instant relative to the Boston Frigate. We beg leave to assure your Excellency that the Frigate called the Boston, now at Bourdeaux, is a Ship of War belonging to the 13 United States of North America, built and maintained at their Expence, by the Honourable Congress. We therefore, humbly presume that his Majestys...
Being too much indisposd to come to Passi this morning, and thinking the subjects of the enclosd Letters of pressing importance; I have sent you what I think shoud be written. You will make such Alterations as you think proper. But if the subordinate Servants of the public continue to obey or not obey our Orders as they please—to act as they will, without taking our orders—to involve us in...
Paris, 18 May 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:102 ; ordered printed by the congress as a broadside (illustration facing p. 99 ). This letter was signed by Adams and Franklin because, according to Arthur Lee in his Letterbook ( PCC , No. 102, IV, f. 7), “this Intelligence was sent...
Passy, 22 May 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:110 . Citing the usual practice under the law of nations of allowing six months after the commencement of hostilities for subjects of both sides to remove their property, Adams and Franklin requested that, if possible, the General Court...
I request your Honours Favour in behalf of the Officers and Men, that you would point out some Method to bring the Prizes to sail, which we took on the late Cruize, as we are much in want of Cloathing and other Necessaries which we cannot do without. Many of Us have Wives and Children now suffering in America, the Time for which most of the People engag’d being now almost expired, and no...
We agree that the Bills drawn on you, by Mr. Williams, and paid by you according to the list herewith transmitted shall be charged to the Public Account of the United States; Mr. Williams to be accountable for the expenditure of all the sayd Sums to Congress or to any Person, or Persons appointed by Congress for that purpose, and to the Commissioners of the United States at the Court of France...
We herewith communicate to your Excellency a Resolution of Congress relative to the Treaties, which we request may be laid before the King. Thereby his Majesty will perceive the unfeigned Sentiments of that Body, as well as those of the whole American People, whose Hearts the King has gained by his great Benevolence towards them, manifested in these Treaties, which has made so deep an...
We received your Excellencys Letter of May 29, by Captain Niles, with the Dispatches from Congress, which you had intrusted him, with, in good order. He had a short Passage of 22 days and brought Us the agreable News of the Ratification of the Treaties, and of their being universally pleasing to our Country. We shall order some Lead to be shipped on Board his Vessell, and have furnished him...
We have received your Letters relative to the Disputes between two of your Officers and some of your Men belonging to this Nation, and we are of Opinion that if the Men are inlisted upon the Ships Books, to go to Boston, they ought to return to the Ship, and be received by you, and are entitled to their Wages and prize Money. But if they are not inlisted in writing to go to Boston, but only...
We have just received a Message from Monsr. Le Comte De Vergennes, by his Secretary, acquainting Us; that Information is received from England of the Intention of the Cabinet there, to offer (by additional Instructions to their Commissioners) Independence to the United States, on Condition of their making a Separate Peace, relying on their Majority in both Houses, for Approbation of the...
Sans Etre Connu de vous Je prens La liberté de Vous Ecrire, Parce que Je Pense que les Réprésentans d’une nation, qui doit son Existence à ses Vertus, sont assés amis des hommes, pour Vouloir Bien, Eclaircir un de leurs Semblables Sur les moyens qu’Il Se Propose de Parvenir au Bonheur. Les Travaux d’une Vie active, honorables puis qu’Ils Sont Utiles, dérogent En france, par L’Effet d’un...
Although a stranger to you, I take the liberty of writing because I think that, as the representatives of a nation owing its existence to its virtues, you are sufficiently the friends of mankind to care to clarify for one of your fellow men the means by which he proposes to achieve happiness. In France, by the effect of a national prejudice, the labors of an active life, honorable as they are...
We do not think ourselves authorized to give any Orders concerning the Deductions to be made from the Seamen’s Price money or Wages, of what was advanced to them. The Resolutions of Congress must be complied with as to your Stores and Furniture, we suppose there can be no Difficulty, but that M. Simpson will as he ought to deliver you your private Property upon Request. We are not informed...
We received yours of the 18 Instant. Mr. Bersoll has already been informed that he must send his Accounts and Vouchers to us before we can order him to be paid therefore you will inform him that ’ till he has furnished us with these for our Examination he must not expect payment and we hope that for his own sake as well as for ours he will not proceed to the indecent Violence you apprehend. We...
There are several Subjects, which we find it necessary to lay before your Excellency; to which we have the Honour to request your Attention. At a time when the Circumstances of the War may demand the Attention of Gouvernment, and without doubt call for great Expence, we are very sorry to be obliged to request your Excellency’s Advice respecting the Subject of Money but the Nature of the War in...
Nous avons profité de l’Occasion de Mr. Whitall pour vous faire parvenir un Livre relie en Burane Basane con tenant deux cent cinq promesses de mille Florins chaque ce qui forme, un Capital de deux cent cinq mille Florins Argent Courant d’Hollande payable le premier Janvier mil sept cent quatre vingt huit a votre Domicile, garnies de dix Coupons de cinquante Florins d’Interet pour Année le...
We take the opportunity of Mr. Whitall’s visit to convey to you a leather-bound book containing 205 promissory notes, each worth 1,000 florins, making a capital fund of 205,000 florins lawful money of the Netherlands, to be paid on 1 January 1788 at your residence with, in addition, 10 coupons of 50 florins in interest for the year, the whole payable to the bearer and signed by us. You will...
Notre ami et moi nous nous proposons de faire faire un nouveau pas à sa Ville, plus grand encore, que les derniers qu’elle a faits; et nous espérons, s’il plait à Dieu de le bénir, et à vos ennemis de continuer à maltraiter cette Republique pour faire notre jeu bon, qu’il pourra nous conduire au grand et dernier, qui opereroit l’union parfaite des deux Soeurs. Pour cet effet, il faut garnir...