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    • Franklin, Benjamin

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 11-20 of 13,687 sorted by editorial placement
By sundry Letters from Merchants of Bourdeaux and Nantes, we are inform’d, that many Adventures to America are discouraged by the high Price of Insurance, and the Number of Captures made by the English, which together have an Operation almost equal to an Embargo; so that the Commerce which might be so advantageous, to both Countries, by supplying their mutual Wants, is obstructed, and the...
We have the Honour of acquainting your Excellency, that the United States of North America, being now an Independant Power, and acknowledged as such by this Court, a Treaty of Amity and Commerce is compleated between France and the Said States, of which we shall speedily send your Excellency a Copy, to be communicated if you think proper to their High Mightinesses, for whom, the United States,...
We had this Morning the Honour of receiving your Excellency’s Letter of the 13. Instant relative to the Boston Frigate. We beg leave to assure your Excellency that the Frigate called the Boston, now at Bourdeaux, is a Ship of War belonging to the 13 United States of North America, built and maintained at their Expence, by the Honourable Congress. We therefore, humbly presume that his Majestys...
Being too much indisposd to come to Passi this morning, and thinking the subjects of the enclosd Letters of pressing importance; I have sent you what I think shoud be written. You will make such Alterations as you think proper. But if the subordinate Servants of the public continue to obey or not obey our Orders as they please—to act as they will, without taking our orders—to involve us in...
Paris, 18 May 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:102 ; ordered printed by the congress as a broadside (illustration facing p. 99 ). This letter was signed by Adams and Franklin because, according to Arthur Lee in his Letterbook ( PCC , No. 102, IV, f. 7), “this Intelligence was sent...
Passy, 22 May 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:110 . Citing the usual practice under the law of nations of allowing six months after the commencement of hostilities for subjects of both sides to remove their property, Adams and Franklin requested that, if possible, the General Court...
I request your Honours Favour in behalf of the Officers and Men, that you would point out some Method to bring the Prizes to sail, which we took on the late Cruize, as we are much in want of Cloathing and other Necessaries which we cannot do without. Many of Us have Wives and Children now suffering in America, the Time for which most of the People engag’d being now almost expired, and no...
We agree that the Bills drawn on you, by Mr. Williams, and paid by you according to the list herewith transmitted shall be charged to the Public Account of the United States; Mr. Williams to be accountable for the expenditure of all the sayd Sums to Congress or to any Person, or Persons appointed by Congress for that purpose, and to the Commissioners of the United States at the Court of France...
We herewith communicate to your Excellency a Resolution of Congress relative to the Treaties, which we request may be laid before the King. Thereby his Majesty will perceive the unfeigned Sentiments of that Body, as well as those of the whole American People, whose Hearts the King has gained by his great Benevolence towards them, manifested in these Treaties, which has made so deep an...
We received your Excellencys Letter of May 29, by Captain Niles, with the Dispatches from Congress, which you had intrusted him, with, in good order. He had a short Passage of 22 days and brought Us the agreable News of the Ratification of the Treaties, and of their being universally pleasing to our Country. We shall order some Lead to be shipped on Board his Vessell, and have furnished him...