You
have
selected

  • Correspondent

    • Franklin, Benjamin

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 1971-1980 of 13,979 sorted by recipient
Copy: Mrs. Ailsa Joan Mary Dick-Cunyngham, Prestonfield, Edinburgh (1955) Verses by Doctor Franklin to Sir Alexander and Lady Dick many years ago wrote at Coldstream on his return to England. ——October 1759 Verses addressd to Lady Dick by Robert Alexander Esquire — October 1759 1 2 3 4 The exact date when BF composed and sent these verses cannot be determined, but it was probably during the...
ALS : New York Public Library After we took leave of you, we spent some Weeks in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, and at length arriv’d at our House here in good Health, having made a Tour of near 1500 Miles, in which we had enjoy’d a great deal of Pleasure, and receiv’d a great deal of useful Information. But no part of our Journey affords us, on Recollection, a more pleasing Remembrance, than...
ALS : New York Public Library I received your kind Congratulations on my Return to Britain, by Mr. Alexander, which were very obliging. The Slip to Dr. Morgan I sent after him to America, where I hope he is safely arrived before this time. He always express’d himself greatly oblig’d to you for the Notice you took of him and the Countenance you afforded him; and I shall always thank you...
ALS : New York Public Library I take the Opportunity of a Ship from this Place to Leith, once more to pay my Respects to my good Friend from this Side the Water, and to assure him that neither Time nor Distance have in the least weakened the Impression on my Mind, stampt there by his Kindness to me and my Son, while we were in Scotland. When I saw him last, we talk’d over the pleasant Hours we...
ALS : Yale University Library I am now here just on the Point of departing for America. I cannot go without taking Leave of one from whom I received so many Civilities, so much real Kindness. Accept my sincerest Thanks, and do me the Justice to believe that wherever I am, I shall, while I live, retain a grateful Sense of your Favours. I cannot hope ever to see you in America; but possibly some...
ALS : New York Public Library; copy (incomplete): Scottish Record Office It gives me Pleasure to learn, by yours of Nov. 12. that my young Friend Mr. Morgan has render’d himself agreable to you, and that your Health and Eyes were much better. I sent some time since to Mr. Dalrymple one of my Machines for your Chimney, who readily paid the Smith’s Bill for the same. But now, on discoursing with...
ALS : New York Public Library My last Expedition convinc’d me that I grow too old for Rambling, and that ’twas probable I should never make such another Journey. ’Tis an uncomfortable Thing, the Parting with Friends one hardly expects ever again to see. This, with some occasional Hindrances, prevented my calling at Preston Fields after my Return from Glasgow: But my Heart was with you and your...
ALS : Western Reserve Historical Society It gave me great Pleasure to learn from Dr. Robertson, that you and Lady Dick and your lovely Bairns, were all well and happy. Now that the long Litigation between our Province and the Proprietaries, which I had the Care of, is finished, I hope to be a better and more punctual Correspondent. My Time will be more my own. I am in debt to my Friends in...
ALS : Mrs. Ailsa Joan Mary Dick-Cunyngham, Prestonfield, Edinburgh (1955) Dr. Franklin and his Son present their respectful Compliments to Sir Alexander Dick, and shall attend him to Preston-field tomorrow with great Pleasure. They are extreamly oblig’d to Sir Alexander for his kind Invitation to spend some Days at his Seat in the Country, but doubt the short Stay they must make in these Parts...
Copy: Library of Congress I received yours inclosing a very obliging Letter from Mr. President Banks. The Congress cannot be said to have ordered the Instructions I gave, tho’ they would no doubt have done it, if such a Thing had been mentioned to them. It is therefore not proper to use any farther Endeavours to procure a Medal for them. I do not indeed perceive that one is intended for me as...