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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 71-80 of 14,042 sorted by date (ascending)
MS Minute Book: Library Company of Philadelphia The Directors, in Town, met with the Treasurer and Secretary at Nicholas Scull’s, as was agreed at last Meeting, B. Franklin having sent a Messenger about with printed Notes in these Words Vizt. “Sir. Next Saturday Evening Attendance will be given at N. Scull’s, to receive the Money subscribed to the Library, of those who have not yet paid; when...
Reprinted from The Columbian Magazine , I (December, 1786), 159–61; incomplete copy: American Philosophical Society Franklin and chess have long been associated in the popular mind largely because of this bagatelle, which was the most widely reprinted product of his Passy press. Made public for the first time in 1786, it would be reprinted at least a dozen times by the end of the century, and...
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , June 26, 1732; also draft: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I am puzzled with a certain Case of Conscience, which I would gladly have well solved; and if the acute Gentleman who has sometimes in your Paper assum’d the Name of Casuist , would undertake the Discussion, it will exceedingly oblige, Your Friend and Reader, &c. The Case is this; Suppose A...
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , July 3, 1732; also draft: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The Case of Conscience propos’d to me in you last Gazette, does not require much Consideration to give an Answer. It should seem that the Proposer of that Case, is either no Christian, or a very ill instructed one; otherwise he might easily have learnt his Duty from these positive Laws of...
Draft: Historical Society of Pennsylvania Anti Casuist says: I allow the Heighnousness of the Crime, &c. Whether I am a Christian or a Man of Reason, I am not unjustifiable in doing it, from these Considerations. If my Wife commits Adultery with him, she thereby dissolves the Bond of Marriage between her and me, and makes us two separate and single Persons. The Laws of every Country and even...
76Anthony Afterwit, 10 July 1732 (Franklin Papers)
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , July 10, 1732; also draft: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I am an honest Tradesman, who never meant Harm to any Body. My Affairs went on smoothly while a Batchelor; but of late I have met with some Difficulties, of which I take the Freedom to give you an Account. About the Time I first address’d my present Spouse, her Father gave out in Speeches, that...
77Celia Single, 24 July 1732 (Franklin Papers)
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , July 24, 1732; also draft: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I must needs tell you, that some of the Things you print do more Harm than Good; particularly I think so of my Neighbour the Tradesman’s Letter in one of your late Papers, which has broken the Peace of several Families, by causing Difference between Men and their Wives: I shall give you here...
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , September 12, 1732; also draft: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I was highly pleased with your last Week’s Paper upon Scandal , as the uncommon Doctrine therein preach’d is agreeable both to my Principles and Practice, and as it was published very seasonably to reprove the Impertinence of a Writer in the foregoing Thursdays Mercury , who at the...
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , November 9, 1732. As you sometimes take upon you to correct the Publick, you ought in your Turn patiently to receive publick Correction. My Quarrel against you is, your Practice of publishing under the Notion of News, old Transactions which I suppose you hope we have forgot. For Instance, in your Numb. 669, you tell us from London of July 20. That the...
80On Colds, 30 November 1732 (Franklin Papers)
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , November 30, 1732. From all Parts of this Province, and even from Maryland, People complain of Colds, which are become more general than can be remember’d in these Parts before. Some ascribe this Distemper to the sudden Change of Weather into hard Frost, which we had about the middle of November; but others believe it contagious, and think ’tis...