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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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    • Hartley, David
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    • Revolutionary War
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    • Franklin, Benjamin

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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Hartley, David" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
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Transcript: Library of Congress I received duly your Favours of July 14. and August 14. I hoped to have answered them sooner, by sending the Passport. Multiplicity of Business has I suppose been the only Occasion of Delay in the Ministers to consider of and make out the said Passport. I hope now soon to have it, as I do not find there is any Objection made to it. In a former Letter I propos’d...
Two copies and transcript: Library of Congress Inclosed is the List of our Prisoners, which by an accident was long in coming to us. There are supposed to be about 15 more remaining in the Hospital, whose names we have not yet obtained, and about as many who being recovered of their wounds have been suffered to go home to England. If you continue in the Opinion of making the exchange at...
LS : M.D.A.F.H.H. Hartley Russell, on deposit in the Berkshire Record Office (1955); copy and transcript: Library of Congress Having just received the Passport desired for the Cartel to make use of the Port of Morlaix, I take this first Opportunity of sending it to you, in hopes of releasing by more expeditious Voyages the poor Prisoners on both Sides before the Severity of Winter comes on....
Copies: Library of Congress, William L. Clements Library Since mine of the 5th. I have thought farther of the Subject of our late Letters. You were of Opinion that the late Ministry desired sincerily a Reconciliation with America, and with that View a separate Peace with us was proposed. It happened that at the same time Lord North had an Emissary here, employ’d to sound the French Ministers...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin . . . (4to ed.; 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 249. I thank you for your kind caution, but having nearly finished a long life, I set but little value on what remains of it. Like a draper, when one chaffers with him for a remnant, I am ready to say, “As it is only the fag-end, I will not differ...
ALS , copy, and transcript: Library of Congress I received your Favour of Oct. 26. containing Copies of sundry Letters you had before sent me, which you apprehended had not been receiv’d. For the same reason I send you herewith Copies of several I have sent to you. I am sorry my Proposition of Exchanging in Holland was not attended to. It would have prevented a good deal of Misery to those...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London 1817–18), II , 387–88. I received your favour of the 26th past by Mr. Young, and am indebted to you for some preceding. I do not know why the good work of peace goes on so slowly on your side. Some have imagined that your ministers since Rodney’s success are desirous of...
LS : Yale University Library Since those acknowledg’d in my last, I have received your Several Favours of Aug. 16. 20. & 26. I have been a long time afflicted with the Gravel & Gout, which have much indispos’d me for writing: I am even now in Pain, but will not longer delay some answer. I did not perfectly comprehend the Nature of your Appointment respecting the Refugees, and I suppos’d you...
ALS and transcript: Library of Congress; copy: Public Record Office I now send you the Passport required. I postpon’d answering your last in hopes of obtaining it sooner; but tho’ it was long since agreed to, much Business in the Admiralty Department here has I suppose occasion’d its Delay. The Port of Calais was not approv’d of, and I think the Ports mention’d (Nantes or L’Orient) are better...
LS : The Current Company, Bristol, R.I. (1977); transcript: Library of Congress I a long time believed that your Government were in earnest in agreeing to an Exchange of Prisoners. I begin now to think I was mistaken. It seems they cannot give up the pleasing Idea of having at the End of the War 1000 Americans to hang for high Treason. You were also long of Opinion, that the Animosity against...