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AD : Library of Congress On January 29 Chatham left with Franklin the conciliatory plan that he introduced as a bill in the House of Lords three days later, and the American studied and copied it. At the end of his copy is the following memorandum on the rejection of the bill. The above Plan was offered by the Earl of Chatham to the House of Lords, on Wednesday Feb. 1. 1775, under the Title of...
ALS (incomplete): Yale University Library This fragment is now bound, in a volume of Franklin’s correspondence with Shipley, as a postscript to the Bishop’s holograph copy of his letter below at the end of June, 1775. But the paper is larger than that of the copy; it has been folded, as the copy has not; and it is addressed and has the remnants of a seal. The conclusion is inescapable that it...
ALS (incomplete): American Philosophical Society [ Missing ] ourselves without making Mr. W—s experiment. But to be serious; unluckily for that Gentleman I have drawn no conclusion from his favourite experiment, except it be this, that a point will not invite a stroke of lightning upon it, at 12 times the distance of a knob. The chains happen’d to be both of the same wire, and length. Whoever...
Printed form with MS insertions in blanks: American Philosophical Society Vous étes prié, de la part de Monsieur le Curé & de Madame Le Veillard , Trésoriere des Pauvres, de vous trouver à l’Assemblée de Charité qui se tiendra dans l’Eglise Royale & Paroissiale de Notre-Dame-de-Graces de Passy, à l’issue des Vépres, Dimanche prochain 5 7bre 1779 Il y aura Prédication, par mr L’abbé gautier...
Reprinted from The Columbian Magazine , I (December, 1786), 159–61; incomplete copy: American Philosophical Society Franklin and chess have long been associated in the popular mind largely because of this bagatelle, which was the most widely reprinted product of his Passy press. Made public for the first time in 1786, it would be reprinted at least a dozen times by the end of the century, and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The condescending respect with which Your Excellency hath in repeated Instances regarded me and mine is matter of gratful contemplation. Permit us to look with sincerest Veneration to the Man distinguish’d amongst a glorious Band of firm Characters: who sustain’d by divine Providence, have thus farr, form’d and Fostered the Rising world of Freedom. May...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Bearer is Baron Steieben of whome I had the honor to write to you by the hands of a Friend about a month since. He is a Gentleman of Family, Merit and great experience, well known to some of the First Personages in Europe, and hereby gives you sir a strong proof of his Ambition to make the Acquaintance of Doctor Franklin in actualy performing a Journey...
AD : American Philosophical Society These two notes for borrowers from the Library Company demarcated the sheep from the goats. The sheep, who were the members, promised to pay for books not returned on time and in good condition; the goats put down a refundable deposit. The requirement of a promissory note from a member went back at least to 1732, and a note to accompany a nonmember’s deposit...
Incomplete draft: American Philosophical Society Illustrissimo Signor Signor Padrone mio Colendissimo. A quest’ora avrete ricevuto risposta alle vostre direttavi per mezzo [ blank in MS ] riceverete anche questa per l’istesso canale, e potrete rispondermi per il medesimo; che così La spesa sarà tutta addosso a me, e riceverò lettere sicuramente; perciocchè le due penultime vostre hanno tardato,...
10Memorandum Book, 1757–1776 (Franklin Papers)
MS account book: American Philosophical Society [April 3, 1757] Before leaving for England Franklin provided his wife with a long, narrow account book in which she was to record her expenditures during his absence. She made the first entry on April 3, even before he had gone. But later, like many wives—and husbands too—she was far from meticulous in recording everything she spent. There are...