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    • Laurens, Henry
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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Laurens, Henry" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 1-10 of 39 sorted by relevance
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We have just received a Message from Monsr. Le Comte De Vergennes, by his Secretary, acquainting Us; that Information is received from England of the Intention of the Cabinet there, to offer (by additional Instructions to their Commissioners) Independence to the United States, on Condition of their making a Separate Peace, relying on their Majority in both Houses, for Approbation of the...
ALS (draft) and three copies: Public Record Office; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society (two) Knowing the Expectation of the King’s Ministers, that a full Indemnity shall be provided for the whole Body of Refugees, either by a Restitution of their Property, or by some stipulated Compensation for their Losses, and being confident, as...
Transcript: New York Public Library Strachey’s return to Paris opened a new round of intensive negotiations which culminated in the signing of a provisional peace treaty on November 30. The present document is Strachey’s recollection of what he said to the American peace commissioners when he presented them with the British counterproposal to their second draft treaty. This meeting was held at...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress; partial copy: Library of Congress It is some Months ago since I had the honor to write you, & am well persuaded, altho I received no Answer thereto, that it will have engaged your attention. I earnestly wish it may have been productive of an Improvement to the Finances of Congress which I then foresaw would be short of our Wants &...
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
We have the Honour to inclose a Copy of the Declaration concerning the 11 and 12 Articles of the Treaty of Commerce, which we have received from his Excellency the Secretary of State for foreign Affairs, in exchange for a similar one signed by us, in Pursuance of the Instructions of Congress. We have also the Honour to inclose Copies of a Correspondence with his Excellency Mr. de Sartine, the...
LS : American Philosophical Society En conformité des ordres du Roi, les Officiers de l’Amirauté de la Guadeloupe ont l’honneur d’adresser à Vos Excellences, deux copies de procedures instruites au sujet des prises amenées à la Guadeloupe par des corsaires Americains. Nous Sommes avec respect, Messieurs, de Vos Excellences, Les très-humbles & très-obéissans Serviteurs Notation: Salimon 3. avl....
Copies: Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives This letter from Elias Boudinot, president of Congress, not only announces the resignation of Minister for Foreign Affairs Robert R. Livingston, it also encloses a resolution of great importance to the peace commissioners. On February 5 John Adams had written to Congress that there no longer was a reason to...
The United States of America in Congress Assembled. To all to whom these presents shall come send Greeting. Whereas these United States from a sincere desire of putting an end to the hostilities between his most Christian Majesty and these United States on the one part, and his Britannic Majesty on the other, and of terminating the same by a peace founded on such solid and equitable principles...
Copy: National Archives As Congress have not yet elected any Minister for Foreign Affairs, and knowing the importance of your Being fully informed of every public transaction relative to these States, I have concluded that you would not think it amiss to hear from me on the subject of the removal of Congress to this place, tho’ I cannot consider this communication as official but merely for...