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  • Recipient

    • Jay, John
    • Jay, John
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    • Franklin, Benjamin
    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jay, John" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
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As I am informed that next Wednesday is appointed for the Signature of the definitive Treaties of Peace, I Suppose it will be thought proper to think of Some Conveyance of the Ratification of the Provisional Treaty, and of the Original of our definitive Treaty as Soon as it Shall be Signed To Congress. By what Vessell it will be proper to Send it, deserves to be considered as soon as possible,...
The bearer hereof Colo. James Monroe who served some time as an officer in the American army and as such distinguished himself in the affair of Princetown as well as on other occasions, having resumed his studies, comes to Europe to complete them. Being a citizen of this state, of abilities, merit and fortune, and my particular friend, I take the liberty of making him known to you, that should...
ALS : Columbia University Library; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society As I am informed that next Wednesday is appointed for the Signature of the definitive Treaties of Peace, I Suppose it will be thought proper to think of Some Conveyance of the Ratification of the Provisional Treaty, and of the Original of our definitive Treaty as Soon as it Shall be Signed to Congress. By what Vessell it...
Paris, 21 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:131–134 . LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. This memorial was Hartley’s response to the article that the commissioners had proposed on 29 April to open American and British ports to virtually unrestricted free trade, to which Hartley had at least tentatively agreed ( calendared, above
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress; partial copy: Library of Congress It is some Months ago since I had the honor to write you, & am well persuaded, altho I received no Answer thereto, that it will have engaged your attention. I earnestly wish it may have been productive of an Improvement to the Finances of Congress which I then foresaw would be short of our Wants &...
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
LS : American Philosophical Society En conformité des ordres du Roi, les Officiers de l’Amirauté de la Guadeloupe ont l’honneur d’adresser à Vos Excellences, deux copies de procedures instruites au sujet des prises amenées à la Guadeloupe par des corsaires Americains. Nous Sommes avec respect, Messieurs, de Vos Excellences, Les très-humbles & très-obéissans Serviteurs Notation: Salimon 3. avl....
Copies: Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives This letter from Elias Boudinot, president of Congress, not only announces the resignation of Minister for Foreign Affairs Robert R. Livingston, it also encloses a resolution of great importance to the peace commissioners. On February 5 John Adams had written to Congress that there no longer was a reason to...
Congress were yesterday pleased to pass the enclosed Resolutions on the subject of the payment of British Debts— The language they speak requires no Comment— I complained in my last of your long Silence, or rather laid before you the Complaint of Congress. These I think receive additional force from Intelligence I have since had, that the Negotiations are still going on, and that important...
The United States of America in Congress Assembled. To all to whom these presents shall come send Greeting. Whereas these United States from a sincere desire of putting an end to the hostilities between his most Christian Majesty and these United States on the one part, and his Britannic Majesty on the other, and of terminating the same by a peace founded on such solid and equitable principles...