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    • Franklin, Benjamin
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Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Arthur" AND Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 61-70 of 305 sorted by relevance
By some of the last Ships from America, we received from Congress certain Powers and Instructions, which we think it necessary to lay before your Excellency, and which we have the Honor to do in this Letter. We have the Honor to enclose to your Excellency a Copy of the Contract made between the Committee and Mr. Francy, a Copy of Mr. Francy’s Powers, and a Copy of the list of Articles to be...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives <Passy, February 1, 1779: We received yours of January 28. We are unhappy that we cannot give you effectual relief. The power to appoint consuls rests wholly with Congress; we can only appoint agents to execute our orders. Congress, a few days before it received news of the Treaty, empowered us to...
We have been favoured with a Letter signed by many Gentlemen of Nantes and dated the fifteenth of this Month, informing us that most of their Vessels were ready to sail to America, and that others were expected to be ready immediately, so that the Convoy need not wait at all, but might be ordered as soon as Convenience will permit. These Gentlemen are very desirous of a Convoy through the...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives We received your Letter dated Paris Hotel de Saxe Aug. 24. and, altho We are altogether of a different opinion from yours respecting your Right of passing with your Effects Americans being intituled by the Treaty, no more than the Subjects of any other state in Europe in Amity with France, to pass with their Effects...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives In Answer to your Excellencys Letter of the Twenty fifth of this Month, We have the Honour to inclose, four Papers, with Blancs to be filled as your Excellency may have occasion. These Requests being all the Protection in our Power to give, We hope will have the desired Effect and We have the Honour to be &c In JA ’s hand.
LS : Archives de la Marine; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, June 15, 1778: We refused M. Bersolle’s previous draft until he had sent his accounts. He then billed us for a thousand louis advanced to Capt. Jones on his arrival. Again we refused, because we had not authorized the advance and, when the Captain wrote that he could not feed his...
Draft: Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: National Maritime Museum, Public Record Office, National Archives (two); transcript: Library of Congress <Passy, September [19], 1778: We have not written you for a long time but have been engaged in negotiating a cartel of exchange, and have assurances from England that an exchange will take place. The government of this kingdom has provided a...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives (two) <Passy, January 4, 1779: We acknowledge your undated letter, and refer you to ours of the second of this month. We cannot furnish Gilbank with more money; perhaps our protest of his bills will convince him. We have applied for the convoy with the greatest possible urgency. We approve your...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives We have received a Letter from Mr. Robert Harrison of the 7 Octr. and another from John Lemon, Edward Driver and John Nichols, of the 12, all Prisoners in Dinant Castle, all professing to be Americans who have been first compelled into the Service of their Enemies, and then taken Prisoners by the French. You are not...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères <Passy, April 10, 1778: Mr. Adams, appointed by Congress to replace Mr. Deane, has arrived and will wait on you as soon as he recovers from his voyage. He came on a continental frigate, which took a prize with a cargo valued at £70,000. Congress is detaining Gen. Burgoyne and his army for a breach of the convention, and has more than 10,000...