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ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania Your favors of the 2d. 8th: and 10 June last have been recd. and Copies transmitted to the Committee. The subject of them certainly merits their Attention, and I hope your Advice will be litterally complied with. As I have not now the Honor of a Seat in Congress, having been called to an office which will confine me in this State, any Information I can...
DS : Yale University Library; copies: Library of Congress (two), American Philosophical Society, Massachusetts Historical Society The present document, penned by William Temple Franklin on October 1, was most likely signed by Franklin the same day. It was eventually signed by all the peace commissioners, but not without hesitation (on the part of John Jay) and outright hostility (on the part...
D and copy: Massachusetts Historical Society; two D and copy: Public Record Office; transcript: National Archives As new American and British negotiators were converging on Paris, Franklin’s isolation in Passy posed certain inconveniences. John Adams arrived on October 26 but, as he initially refused to call on Franklin, the latter was evidently unaware of his arrival until Matthew Ridley...
Articles agreed upon by and between Richard Oswald Esquire the Commissioner of His Britannic Majesty, for treating of Peace with the Commissioners of the United States of America, on behalf of His said Majesty, on the one part. And Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and John Adams, three of the Commissioners of the said States for treating of Peace with the Commissioner of His said Majesty, on their...
LS and three copies: Public Record Office; copies: National Archives (three), Library of Congress (three), Massachusetts Historical Society, William L. Clements Library; transcript: National Archives We have been honoured with your Favor of the 5th. Instant, and as our Answer to a Letter We recieved from Mr. Oswald on the same subject contains our unanimous Sentiments respecting it, We take...
In answer to the letter you did us the honor to write on the 4 th. ins t. we beg leave to repeat what we often said in Conversation, viz. that the Restoration of such of the Estates of Refugees, as have been confiscated, is impracticable; because they were confiscated by Laws of particular States, &, in many instances, have passed by legal titles through several hands— Besides, Sir, as this a...
LS and three copies: Public Record Office; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress (three), Massachusetts Historical Society (three), National Archives, North Carolina State Division of Archives and History; press copy of copy: Library of Congress; transcript: National Archives In answer to the letter you did us the honor to write...
We have received the Letter you did us the honor to write on the 25 th. Inst. Our Country has had early and repeated Proofs both of your Readiness and Abilities to do her Service. The Prospect of an inactive Campaign in America, induced us to adopt the Opinion, that you might be more useful here than there, especially in Case the Negotiation for Peace on the Part of France in England, should...
Congress will recommend to the Legislature of each of the thirteen States to appoint Commissioners to be under Oath to appraise at a just Value, at this Time the Estates that have been confiscated, and to make Provision, in a reasonable Time, not exceeding two Years for the a Compensation, to those of the Refugees who have not taken an active Part in the War against the United states, and of...
AL (draft): Columbia University Library; copies: Library of Congress (two), Massachusetts Historical Society We have recd. the Letter you did us the Honor to write on the 25th. Inst. Our Country has had early & repeated Proofs both of your Readiness and abilities to do her Service. The Prospect of an inactive Campaign in america, induced us to adopt the opinion, that you might be more useful...