You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Franklin, Benjamin
  • Correspondent

    • Franklin, Benjamin

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 1-10 of 4,831 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, American Philosophical Society <Passy, October 1, 1778: Pay to John Adams 6,000 l.t. and charge the same to the commissioners’ account.> This letter only exists as copied in the account books of JA and WTF . It is published in Taylor, Adams Papers , VII , under Oct. 1; it also appears in Account III described above, XXIII , 19.
You are to go by the shortest Road to Dieppe, and make all the Dispatch possible. At Dieppe enquire for Mr. Baron, Merchant there, and take his Advice whether to go off to the Ship, or to acquaint the Captain with your Arrival send him the Letters you have for him, and desire him to come and meet you on shore. The last is safest for the Intelligence you may obtain, as well as for you, if the...
We have been favoured with a Letter signed by many Gentlemen of Nantes and dated the fifteenth of this Month, informing us that most of their Vessels were ready to sail to America, and that others were expected to be ready immediately, so that the Convoy need not wait at all, but might be ordered as soon as Convenience will permit. These Gentlemen are very desirous of a Convoy through the...
Articles agreed upon by and between David Hartley Esquire, Minister Plenipotentiary of his Britannic Majesty for &c in behalf of his Said Majesty on the one Part, and J.A. B.F. J.J. and H.L, Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America for treating of Peace with the Minister Plenipotentiary of his Said Majesty, on their behalf, on the other Part, in Addition to those Articles...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Mr. Beaumarchais shewed us your Letter of the 7th Inst. by which we find that you had not so much Confidence in the Commissioners as to deliver the Cargo of the Amphitrite to their Order untill your Disbursements on the two Frigates should be paid you. On our part tho’ we were greatly surprised at the Amount of those Disbursements as well as the prices of...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; three copies and one transcript: National Archives <Passy, July 20, 1778: The Spy brought us the ratified treaties with France. On the 17th we exchanged ratifications with the count de Vergennes; copies are enclosed. War is not yet declared but hostilities have already commenced, the British and French fleets are at sea, and we hourly expect news...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, November 12, 1778: In view of the magnitude of the alliance between France and the United States, we conceive it would be highly pleasing to our constituents to have a portrait of His Majesty to be kept where Congress sits; if you are of opinion this would give no offense, we request your kind offices to...
Passy, 13 April 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:52 . In replying to Mercklé’s letter of 26 March ( Cal. Franklin Papers, A.P.S. I. Minis Hays, comp., Calendar of the Papers of Benjamin Franklin in the Library of the American Philosophical Society , Philadelphia, 1908; 5 vols. ,...
LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) <Passy, February 10, 1779: As the change in command of the Ranger might be subject to misinterpretation, we hereby certify that your leaving that ship was with our consent and at the express request of M. de Sartine, who desired to employ you in some public service. That Lt. Simpson...
We are honoured with yours of without a date. We wrote you on the Second of this Month to which We refer. We have written to Mr. Gilbank several Times that We could furnish him with no more Money, and that We should protest his Bills. If he will not believe Us, When the Bills arrive if they ever do, which We hope they will not, our Protest Refusal and the consequent Protest Will Convince him....