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ALS : American Philosophical Society I am pleas’d to learn by yours of the 12th that you have taken a circumstantial Account of the Appearances at Trumbles’s House, which you think sufficient to establish my new Hypothesis of the Direction of Lightning. Mr. Kinnersley has sent me a Pane of the Glass with a Letter in which he mentions his Suspicions that the Stroke was upwards. I now write him...
ALS : Yale University Library I have yours of the 4th Inst. and find the Election has turn’d out as I expected. I am glad Rutherford has refus’d to undertake the Stage; for I did not like your proposing it to him. I admire Mr. Colden was so unready; I thought every thing had been fully explain’d to him. Poor Mr. Hunter is relaps’d into his last Summer Fever; and has kept his Bed these 8 Days,...
Extract: reprinted from Collections of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1 (1853), 126. Franklin’s letter is known only by this extract quoted in a letter from William Franklin to Charles Thomson, October 3, 1765. The New Jersey governor introduced the passage in these words: “As a farther proof that my father had no hand in the Stamp Act, I will give you an extract of a letter I...
Extract: Historical Society of Pennsylvania Mr. Cooper, Secretary of the Treasury, is our old Acquaintance, and expresses a hearty Friendship for us both. Enclosed I send you his Billet proposing to make me acquainted with Lord Rockingham. I dine with his Lordship To-morrow. I had a long Audience on Wednesday with Lord Dartmouth. He was highly recommended to me by Lords Grantham and...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Boston, 1833), p. 280. Great changes being expected keeps men’s minds in suspense, and obstructs public affairs of every kind. It is therefore not to be wondered at, that so little progress is made in our American schemes of the Ilinois grant, and...
ALS : Pierpont Morgan Library Dining to day with Mr. Potts, I hear that Letters go by this Night’s Post to Falmouth for the Chance of reaching the Packet. Therefore I write this Line just to say, that I receiv’d yesterday a Line from the Treasury acquainting me that Mr. Kollock is appointed upon my Recommendation to be Collector of Lewes. I shall be more particular in my next. Your...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin Now for the First Time Published (Boston, 1833), p. 280. The Ilinois affair goes forward but slowly. Lord Shelburne told me again last week, that he highly approved of it, but others were not of his sentiments, particularly the Board of Trade. Lyman is...
MS not found; reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c . (quarto edition, London, 1817–18), II, 143–4. I have no letter of yours since my last, in which I answered all preceding ones. Last week I dined at Lord Shelburne’s, and had a long conversation with him and Mr. Conway (there being no other company), on the subject...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Boston, 1833), p. 281. I returned last night from Paris, and just now hear that the Ilinois settlement is approved of in the Cabinet Council, so far as to be referred to the Board of Trade for their opinion, who are to consider it next week. Shelburne...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.,] A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin Now for the First Time Published (Boston, 1833), pp. 281–2. Since my return, the affair of the Ilinois settlement has been renewed. The King in Council referred the proposal to the Board of Trade, who called for the opinion of the merchants on two points,...