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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Franklin, William" AND Period="Colonial" AND Period="Colonial" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
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ALS : British Museum I have been here with Lord Le Despencer about a Week, for a little Country Air and Exercise. I wrote to you per Capt. Falconer, and have nothing to add; but to let you know that I continue very well and hearty. Methinks ’tis time to think of a Profession for Temple, (who is now upwards of 14 ) that the remainder of his Education may have some Relation to it. I have thought...
Extract: British Museum Some tell me that it is determined to displace you likewise, but I do not know it as certain. I only give you the hint, as an Inducement to you to delay awhile your Removal to Amboy, which in that Case woud be an expence and Trouble to no purpose. Perhaps they may expect that your Resentment of their Treatment of me, may induce you to resign, and save them the shame of...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I wrote to you largely by Capt. All, and sent you several Books, some Seeds, &c mentioned in my Letter, and one thing more, viz. a plated Tea Boiler, of Bolton’s make, which I hope will prove good and please. I have not yet got the Bill. I have since receiv’d yours of Jan. 5. which I shall answer largely by next Opportunity, which I suppose will be...
Extract: reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., F.R.S., &c. (quarto edition, 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 161–2. Since my last, a long one of March 13, nothing has been talked or thought of here but elections. There have been amazing contests all over the kingdom, £20 or 30,000 of a side spent in several places, and...
Extract: Library of Congress In yours of May 14th, you acquaint me with your indisposition, which gave me great concern. The resolution you have taken to use more exercise is extremely proper, and I hope you will steadily perform it. It is of the greatest importance to prevent diseases; since the cure of them by physic is so very precarious. In considering the different kinds of exercise, I...
AL (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I send you herewith some Seeds, and shall send more for your Friends, by the Philad. Ships, by whom I shall write more fully. They are Peas of a valuable Sort, and the Turnip Cabbage which abides the Frost of Winter, and therefore of great Use as Feed in the Spring before any other appears. They were given me by our good Friend Mr. Todd. Yours of Oct....
ALS : Yale University Library I have yours of the 4th Inst. and find the Election has turn’d out as I expected. I am glad Rutherford has refus’d to undertake the Stage; for I did not like your proposing it to him. I admire Mr. Colden was so unready; I thought every thing had been fully explain’d to him. Poor Mr. Hunter is relaps’d into his last Summer Fever; and has kept his Bed these 8 Days,...
Reprinted from William Duane, ed., The Works of Benjamin Franklin … (6 vols., Philadelphia, 1808–18), VI , 337–8. I wrote you pretty fully by the last packet, and having had no line from you of later date than the beginning of August, and little stirring here lately, I have now little to write. In that letter I mentioned my having written two papers, of which I preferred the first, but the...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Boston, 1833), p. 280. Great changes being expected keeps men’s minds in suspense, and obstructs public affairs of every kind. It is therefore not to be wondered at, that so little progress is made in our American schemes of the Ilinois grant, and...
Extract: British Museum Both Bigelow and Smyth accept the date that appears on the copy, but we suggest that the copyist was wrong by a year. The point is of some importance because, if the letter was written in 1775, even this small fragment bears on the relationship between father and son when the former returned from England. Although the language is open to various interpretations, the...