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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Franklin, William" AND Period="Colonial" AND Period="Colonial" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
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Reprinted from William Duane, ed., The Works of Benjamin Franklin … (6 vols., Philadelphia, 1808–18), VI , 337–8. I wrote you pretty fully by the last packet, and having had no line from you of later date than the beginning of August, and little stirring here lately, I have now little to write. In that letter I mentioned my having written two papers, of which I preferred the first, but the...
Extract: British Museum Both Bigelow and Smyth accept the date that appears on the copy, but we suggest that the copyist was wrong by a year. The point is of some importance because, if the letter was written in 1775, even this small fragment bears on the relationship between father and son when the former returned from England. Although the language is open to various interpretations, the...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 210–11. I received yours of October 29, and November 2. Your December packet is not yet arrived. No insinuations of the kind you mention, concerning Mr. G—y have reached me, and if they had, it would have been without the least effect; as I have always had...
ALS : British Museum This Line is just to acquaint you that I am well, and that my Office of Deputy-Postmaster is taken from me. As there is no Prospect of your being ever promoted to a better Government, and That you hold has never defray’d its Expences, I wish you were well settled in your Farm. ’Tis an honester and a more honourable because a more independent Employment. You will hear from...
Extract: British Museum Some tell me that it is determined to displace you likewise, but I do not know it as certain. I only give you the hint, as an Inducement to you to delay awhile your Removal to Amboy, which in that Case woud be an expence and Trouble to no purpose. Perhaps they may expect that your Resentment of their Treatment of me, may induce you to resign, and save them the shame of...
Reprinted from George T. Keppel, Earl of Albemarle, Memoirs of the Marquis of Rockingham and His Contemporaries … (2 vols., London, 1852), II , 299–300. I hear a non-importation agreement is intended. If it is general, and the Americans agree in it, the present Ministry will certainly be knocked up, and their Act repealed; otherwise they and their measures will be continued, and the Stamp Act...
ALS : British Museum I have been here with Lord Le Despencer about a Week, for a little Country Air and Exercise. I wrote to you per Capt. Falconer, and have nothing to add; but to let you know that I continue very well and hearty. Methinks ’tis time to think of a Profession for Temple, (who is now upwards of 14 ) that the remainder of his Education may have some Relation to it. I have thought...
ALS : British Museum; letterbook draft: American Philosophical Society I received yours of July 3. from New York, with the Bill of Exchange for Forty Pounds, Cobham on Bond & Ryland, which is carried to the Credit of your Account. I have spoken in Mr. Antill’s Favour, but there seems to have been a previous Disposition of those Places. At the Time of making up the Mail for the August Packet, I...
AL (incomplete letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society [ Page or pages missing ] on their Virtue, Wisdom and Magnanimity: Lord C——n says he would give half his Worth in the World to be present at the Debates of such an uncorrupted Body on so important an Occasion; and I often regret that I did not leave this Country in time to have been there myself. Your Omission of Remittances to...
AD and copy: Library of Congress When Franklin at long last set sail for home, memories of the past months were churning inside him. He spent much of the voyage recounting, in the guise of a letter to his son, the events that had crowded upon him since the previous summer and particularly since early December. He had with him a mass of papers with which he documented his journal; the bulk of...