You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Deane, Silas
  • Correspondent

    • Franklin, Benjamin

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Deane, Silas" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 51-100 of 200 sorted by relevance
ALS : (duplicate): Library of Congress This letter, in form to Morris but in fact to the committee, is the only one from Deane that Franklin surely saw before his departure for France; it was therefore part of his small stock of information about what would face him in Europe. The letter deals only with the preliminaries of Deane’s mission, because he reached France long after he had hoped to....
Copy: South Carolina Historical Society; copy: Connecticut Historical Society We normally summarize contracts of the secret committee signed by Franklin, but this one is important enough to be printed in full because it was the initial reason for Deane’s going to France. Soon after he lost his seat in Congress in October, 1775, and thereby his membership in the secret committee, he began to...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; transcript and two copies: National Archives; copies: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Sheffield City Library We have now the great Satisfaction of acquainting you and the Congress, that the Treaties with France are at length compleated and signed. The first is a Treaty of Amity and Commerce, much on the Plan of that projected in Congress;...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library Soon after my hearing of the Arrival of Mr Barclay in the Character of Vice Consul from Congress I received the inclosed Resolution and Order. I was at the Time setting out for Ostend, or I should have returned immediately to Paris, confident that every Obstacle to a Settlement was at last removed— At Ostend I met Mr Barclay who to my surprize informed...
AL : Library of Congress We have expected some Remittances from you to our credit, in consequence of the sales which have been made at Nantes. You must be sensible how very unbecoming it is of the situation we are in, to be dependent on the credit of others. We therefore desire that you will remit with all possible expedition the Sum allotted by the Congress for our expences. Notation: Mr. T....
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Archivo Historico Nacional On March 14 the commissioners received their first dispatches from America. Among them was the letter above of December 30 from the committee of secret correspondence, enclosing the Congressional authorization to offer Versailles territorial inducements to enter the war. Deane promptly informed Vergennes that...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We recd. from Messrs. Gourlad &c. an acct. of your arrival and were informed that you had a Private Letter for us which we have not yet recd. Conclude it must Come to hand in the Course of this week. Mean time we desire you would inform us in a Letter under Cover of Messrs. Gourlade &c. what is the situation of your Vessels and what their destination, as...
AD (draft) : American Philosophical Society Whereas le Sr. Laradiere Major du Corps Royal du genie, in the Service of his most Christian Majesty, not having obtain’d his Leave of Absence when the Agreement between us and Messieurs le Chevalier du Portal, de Laumoy, and Gouvion, was concluded, viz. on the 13th of this Instant, could not become a Party by signing the said Agreement, but having...
ALS : Public Record Office Your Letter of the 18th: We received, as We gave Our Orders generally to Com: Wickes, we omitted writing in particular to You. We are sensible of Your Spirit, and gallant Behavior as an Officer, and of Your Attachment to your Country as an Americain, and shall with pleasure do justice to your Character in Our Letters to the Congress, who we doubt not will pay due...
Copies: Connecticut Historical Society, University of Virginia Library Yours by Capt. Nicholson are before us. Mr. Deanes Lettres of yesterday proposed passing a Sale of the Lyon and sending her out as french Property, that is that she go down the River as commanded by the french Captain, and that Captain Nicholson instead returning to Nantes go directly to meet her at the mouth of the River...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We have wrote Capt. Nicholson who will procure you a Passage to America and we hope it may be such a one as will be agreable. Inclosed you have a Letter for the Hon’ble the Marine Board which you will send to them and attend their future Orders. Capt. Nicholson will give you notice where to meet him, or the Ship in which you can have a passage. We are...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Yours of the 6th. came to hand in Course; as Mr. W. Lee will be with you before the receipt of this we refer you to him for what has been done as to the Late Mr. Morris’s Papers &c. In regard to the Ship purchased by you, Commanded by Capt. J. Green which you Offer to assign over to the Public account we are content that you do it and Charge the amount to...
ALS : Library of Congress We received your several Letters from Nantes and Portsmouth. We shall be glad to see you here, as soon as is consistent with your Affairs, in order to consult with you on the Matters mention’d in your Instructions from the Congress, &c. We are, with Esteem Sir, Your most obedient and most humble Servants Addressed: To / John Paul Jones Esqr / Nantes Endorsed: Paris...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères We beg Leave to acquaint your Excellency, that we are appointed and fully impowered by the Congress of the United States of America, to propose and negotiate a Treaty of Amity and Commerce between France and the said States. The just and generous Treatment their Trading Ships have received, by a free Admission into the Ports of this Kingdom,...
Copy: British Library In February, 1777, Congress sent a large order for military supplies, including 40,000 uniforms and cloth for as many more, which the commissioners acknowledged in late April. They then moved rapidly. Although they signed no contract before this one, they placed orders many weeks earlier. On April 27 they agreed with Chaumont and Jean Holker, one of the inspectors general...
DS : Library of Congress; ADS (draft): Library of Congress Whereas the Snow Dickenson with her Cargoe, which was the property of the Congress of the United States of America, was by an Act of Piracy, in some of her Crew, carried into the port of Bristol in England, and there as we are informed, was converted to the use of the Government of Great Britain; and the perpetrators of so base and...
ALS : the Johns Hopkins University Library; AL (draft): Library of Congress; copy: Public Record Office. We did ourselves the Honour of writing some time since to your Lordship on the Subject of Exchanging Prisoners. You did not condescend to give us any Answer, and therefore we expect none to this. We however take the Liberty of sending you Copies of certain Depositions, which we shall...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères To his Excellency the Count de Vergennes, Minister for Foreign Affairs We the underwritten, Commissioners from the Congress of the United States of N. America, beg leave to represent to your Excellency, that Captain Burnel, Commander of an armed Vessel commissioned by the said States, did lately take Refuge in the Port of Cherburgh with his...
ALS and copy: National Archives Since Our last We have received the inclosed Intelligence from London, which we take the earliest Opportunity of forwarding, in hopes it may be received with Our other Letters by Nantes. A Vessel from So: Carolina, loaded by that state, which sailed the 20th December, is arrived at L’Orient with Rice and Indigo. As We were particular in Our last which was sent...
Printed in The London Chronicle , November 4–6, 1777. In answer to a letter which concerns some of the most material interests of humanity, and of the two nations, Great Britain, and the United States of America, now at war, we received the enclosed indecent paper, as coming from your Lordship, which we return, for your Lordship’s more mature consideration. The paper was the reply, written on...
ADS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères We the underwritten, Ministers plenipotentiary from the Congress of the United States of America, do hereby acknowledge, that we have received of Mons. Micaut d’Harvelay, Garde du Tresor Royal, the Sum of Five Hundred Thousand Livres, Money of France. Witness our Hands, The loan discussed in the preceding letter. Joseph Micault d’Harvelay...
DS and draft : American Philosophical Society We cannot explain this document. It is among Franklin’s papers, he and his colleagues signed it, and he endorsed it; but we can find no trace of the Cadiz merchant with whom it was supposedly made, or of cannon bought from any Spanish suppliers at this time. One of the central points of this agreement, furthermore, is to barter tobacco for guns;...
Reprinted from Report of the Committee of the House of the 17th February on the Subject of the Claims of the Heirs of Caron de Beaumarchais . . . (20th Congress, 1st session, House of Representatives Report No. 220; [Washington, 1828]), pp. 44–5. Beaumarchais’ letter above to the commissioners of December 6, with a copy to Vergennes, brought to a head the dispute about the cargo of the...
ALS (draft): Library of Congress The Prize of Capt. Wickes, which we ordered into your Hands, we desire you will deliver up to the Disposal of Mr. Lee; and are Your humble Servants Notation: Letter to Mr Williams This is also in BF ’s hand and was clearly intended to accompany the preceding letter; like it, we assume, it was not sent.
LS and transcript: National Archives; incomplete copy: Massachusetts Archives; copy: Harvard University Library Our Dispatches of Decr. 18. which would have acquainted you with the State of our Affairs here, and our Expectations of a speedy Conclusion of the Treaties with this Court, are unfortunately returned; the French Man of War which went on purpose to carry them, having met with some...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Your Favors of the 1st and 4th Inst. are before us and woud sooner have been replied to, but we were in hopes to have recd. the Samples of Indigo referr’d to in yours of the 1st. They are not arrived. We are not however the less sensible of your Kindness and for the Intelligence given us of the Qualities of Indigo, and at the same time of the price of...
Copy: Library of Congress; copy: National Archives In the light of the previous negotiations, this is a remarkable document for the commissioners to have signed. It passed over in silence two main points on which they had been seeking concessions: insurance and transportation; by agreeing to deliver the tobacco in France they tacitly assumed the risks of the sea and responsibility for shipment...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Harvard University Library Being desirous of a conference with you on a subject, that appears to us of importance; we shall be glad to meet you here, or at Versailles, as soon as may be convenient to you. We have the honor to be, with the greatest respect, Sir, Your most Obedient and most Humble Servants Notation: 1778. Mars 4. Both...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Mr. Beaumarchais shewed us your Letter of the 7th Inst. by which we find that you had not so much Confidence in the Commissioners as to deliver the Cargo of the Amphitrite to their Order untill your Disbursements on the two Frigates should be paid you. On our part tho’ we were greatly surprised at the Amount of those Disbursements as well as the prices of...
Copy: National Archives; two copies: Harvard University Library We received the letter which you did us the honour to write to us of the 15th Ultimo and should earlier have replied particularly thereto, but from the daily expectation we had of recieving orders from Congress of the United States on this important subject. We have their commands to inform his Prussian Majesty’s Ambassador here,...
Copy: University of Virginia Library This letter of appointment is the only dated record of one of the most bizarre schemes to which the commissioners ever lent themselves. A considerable amount of material about the plan is extant among Franklin’s papers in the American Philosophical Society: two letters from the Baron to the commissioners, a proposed agreement between him and Franklin, and a...
AD : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères In the several Memoires which Mr: Deane had the honor of presenting previous to the arrival of his Colleagues, the history of the dispute between the United States of America and Great Brittain was brought down to the Time of presenting the Memoires, the situation and resources of the United States justly stated; and Conjectures as to the...
AL (draft): Library of Congress; copies: Library of Congress, British Library The Congress of the United States of America have seen with Concern in the Public Newspapers an Edict of the late King of Portugal dated at the Palace of Ajuda: the 4th of July 1776 wherein the said States are spoken of in Terms of Contumely, and all Ships belonging to their People then in the Ports of Portugal are...
DS : National Archives; copies in French and English: Massachusetts Historical Society, Harvard Univeristy University Library, National Archives; copies in French: Archives du ministère des affaires étrangères (draft), Harvard University Library, Archivo Historico Nacional, Madrid Treaty of Amity and Commerce. Traité d’Amitié et de Commerce The most Christian King, and the thirteen United...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Harvard University Library We have consider’d your Proposition of Returning in case of the Accident you mention on this Coast, and approve of the same: You will therefore act accordingly. We wish you a good Voyage, and are Sir, Your humble Servants Addressed: To Captn. / John Folger / To Care of Mr. Jno. Moylan / Merchs / Havre du Grace In BF ’s...
ALS : Archivo Historico Nacional; draft: Harvard University Library We wish to inform your Excellency, that we are directed by the United States of America, to cultivate the Friendship of the Court of Spain, with that of France. For that purpose, as well as to pay our personal Respects to your Excellency, we purpose to wait upon you to-morrow, or on any other Day that will be more convenient,...
ALS : Public Record Office You are directed to call on Capt. Wicks on your return, and inform him that We have pursuant to his proposal, ordered the Lexington, under your Command to proceed with him on the Cruise on which he is bound; you will agree with Capt. Wicks, on the place of your Rendevouz, your Signals &c. which you are to take in writing, and carefully attend to. You will also follow...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Harvard University Library The News you have receiv’d from England cannot be true. No Treaty would be entred into with Howe by Washington, when the Congress was at hand: And Howe could have no Propositions to make but such as were authoris’d by the Act of Parliament, and had been long since rejected, (viz.) Pardon upon Submission ....
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We are informed that the Ship Portsmouth, which left Bourdeaux a few days since, made Prize of a Vessel from Cork entering the River, with a Pilot onboard and after she had got into the Passage of Grave. This is the Captain’s Story, on which his complaint is founded. We ask you to enquire into the particulars of this Transaction and send us the Pilots...
(I) AL (draft): University of Virginia Library; (II) two copies: University of Virginia Library; (III) copy: Harvard University Library The first fruit of Gustavus Conyngham’s cruise in the Surprize was the capture of the Prince of Orange , the packet from Harwich to the Netherlands. She yielded some two thousand letters, dispatches, and bills of credit, which were forwarded to Franklin. Some...
DS : Yale University Library Jacques Boux had achieved an eminence in the French navy remarkable for one who was not of noble birth. The government had called on him in 1771 for advice in reorganizing naval administration, and the following year had promoted him to capitaine de vaisseau. In 1776, however, a new minister shelved his suggested reforms and substituted others. Boux, annoyed at...
Copy: National Archives; copy: University of Virginia Library; AL (draft): Library of Congress We are inform’d that the Cargoes at Nantes, have been disposed of some time past, yet we are still without any remittance from you. The Congress directed you to pay Mr. Dean for the purposes of our Embassy the sum of ten Thousand pounds; this you must consider as the first and most Important...
ALS : American Philosophical Society We Recd: yours giving an Acct. of the Arrival of the Goods on which we had not made any Insurance. From the Situation of your Affairs when you wrote Us last, we presume that Your Ship, Capt. Green is ready for sailing. Capt. Nicholson will also be ready in a few Days, We have therefore to propose to you that They go in Company as Capt. Nicholson will be...
AL (draft ): Library of Congress; two copies: National Archives The Hope of obtaining previously by means of Mr. Ross, a clear State of Mr. Morris’s Proceedings in the Commercial Affairs of the Congress, which was our Inducement to advise your Stay here for some time, being vanished, we now think it prudent and right for you to proceed to Nantes as soon as possible, and there take such...
Attested copy: Harvard University Library; copies: British Library (incomplete), National Archives (three), Sheffield City Library (two), South Carolina Historical Society We received duly your Dispatches by Mr. McCrery, and Capt. Young, dated May 20 and 30. June 13, 18, and 26 and July 2. The Intelligence they contain is very particular and Satisfactory. It rejoices us to be informed that...
Copy: National Archives; draft: American Philosophical Society; transcript: National Archives Franklin presumably approved this commitment to the three Frenchmen, and to La Radière four days later; but he soon came to regret the whole business. “I was concerned in sending the 4 Engineers,” he wrote eight months afterward, “and in making the Contract with them: but before they went, I had...
DS : American Philosophical Society <Charleville, May 30, 1777, in French: Mercier will engage at least forty qualified workmen to come to Nantes as soon as possible. He will contract with each of them at a fixed price, not to exceed 2 l.t. 2 sols for each gun that needs to be dismantled, cleaned, and reassembled; any new work will be done as cheaply as possible. He will obtain parts from the...
Copy: University of Virginia Library Yours of the 24th we received and have wrote M. Morris requiring a Copy of his Commission. This with the Steps you have taken is all that at Present, appears necessary. You may take Capt. Thompson’s Paper; But make no Discount; and Hold it in your hands untill further Orders. As to the Duc de Chartres We submit the Price of her to your Judgement which must...
ADS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Harvard University Library This memorandum, most of it in Franklin’s hand, marks a distinct departure from the position that he generally maintained. He “was from the first averse to warm and urgent solicitations with the Court of France,” Silas Deane remarked years later. “His age and experience, as well as his philosophical temper,...
Copy and transcript: National Archives; copy: Harvard University Library The commissioners had been plagued from the start by the lack of regular and reliable communication with America. On April 1 they had signed a contract with Chaumont for establishing a packet service; now, a month later, the service was ready to start as soon as the first packet arrived from Morlaix and took on her cargo....