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    • Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles
    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 11-20 of 35 sorted by date (ascending)
[ Eppington, Va., 13 Sep. 1785 . Recorded in SJL as received 19 Jan. 1786, “by Mr. Littlepage.” Not found.]
The Mr. Fitzhughs having staid here longer than they expected, I have (since writing my letter of Aug. 30, to Mr. Eppes) received one from Dr. Currie, of August 5, by which I have the happiness to learn you are all well, and my Poll also. Every information of this kind is like gaining another step, and seems to say we “have got so far safe.” Would to God the great step was taken and taken...
The Mr. Fitzhughs having staid here longer than they expected, I have (since writing my letter of Aug. 30. to Mr. Eppes) received one from Dr. Currie of Aug. 5. by which I have the happiness to learn you are all well and my Poll also. Every information of this kind is like gaining another step, and seems to say ‘We have got so far safe.’ Would to god the great step was taken and taken safely;...
Your favour of Sep. the 22. was never received untill the first of this month. We are particularly unfortunate with regard to our letters. I think at least half have miscarry’d on both sides. The seeds, you so obligingly mention, have never come to hand. The conveyance is so uncertain, I must entreat you not to think of venturing any thing more. We have been made very happy by a visit from...
I perceive indeed that our friends are kinder than we have sometimes supposed them, and that their letters do not come to hand. I am happy that yours of July 30 . has not shared the common fate. I received it about a week ago, together with one from Mr. Eppes announcing to me that my dear Polly will come to us the ensuing summer. Tho’ I am distressed when I think of this voiage, yet I know it...
I never was more anxious to hear from you than at present, in hopes of your countermanding your orders with regard to dear Polly. We have made use of every stratagem to prevail on her to consent to visit you without effect. She is more averse to it than I could have supposed; either of my children would with pleasure take her place for the number of good things she is promised. However, Mr....
This will, I hope, be handed you by my dear Polly, who I most ardently wish may reach you in the health she is in at present. I shall be truly wretched till I hear of her being safely landed with you. The children will spend a day or two on board the ship with her, which I hope will reconcile her to it. For God’s sake give us the earliest intelligence of her arrival. MS not found; text is...
This will I hope be handed you by my dear Polly, who I most ardently wish may reach you in the health she is in at present. I shall be truly wretched till I hear of her being safely landed with you. The children will spend a day or two on board the ship with her, which I hope will reconcile her to it. For God sake give us the earliest intelligence of her arrival. I am very sorry for the...
Your favors of March 31. and May 7. have been duly received. The last by Polly, whose arrival has given us great joy. Her disposition to attach herself to those who are kind to her had occasioned successive distresses on parting with Capt. Ramsay first, and afterwards with Mrs. Adams. She had a very fine passage, without a storm, and was perfectly taken care of by Capt. Ramsay. He offered to...
Your favor of July 28. gave me inexpressible joy, for my heart ached for the safety of my sweet Polly. Your encomiums on her manners, &c. delight me not a little, as I now hope I saw her with an impartial eye, tho clame not the least merit, for her natural disposition is truly amiable. Your account of dear Patsy adds much to my happiness. The day is far distant I fear for the finishing you are...