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    • Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles
    • Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles
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    • Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles
    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles" AND Recipient="Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles" AND Correspondent="Eppes, Elizabeth Wayles" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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Your favors of March 31. and May 7. have been duly received. The last by Polly, whose arrival has given us great joy. Her disposition to attach herself to those who are kind to her had occasioned successive distresses on parting with Capt. Ramsay first, and afterwards with Mrs. Adams. She had a very fine passage, without a storm, and was perfectly taken care of by Capt. Ramsay. He offered to...
Your kind favor of January 6. has come duly to hand. These marks of your remembrance are always dear to me, and recall to my mind the happiest portion of my life. It is among my greatest pleasures to receive news of your welfare and that of your family. You improve in your trade I see, and I heartily congratulate you on the double blessings of which heaven has just begun to open her stores to...
In my last of July 12. I told you that in my next I would enter into explanations about the time my daughters would have the happiness to see you. Their future welfare requires that this should be no longer postponed. It would have taken place a year sooner but that I wished Polly to perfect herself in her French. I have asked leave of absence of Congress for five or six months of the next...
I had much wished to have had the pleasure of visiting you at Eppington before my departure, but the letters I receive from New York do not permit me to protract my stay a moment. Yesterday we finished our great business and tomorrow I set out. Our family, the new part as well as the old, will pay their respects to you at Eppington as shortly as they can. I shall avail myself of that occasion...
I have recieved your favor of May 23. and with great pleasure, as I do every thing which comes from you. I have had a long attack of my periodical head-ach, which was severe also for a few days, and since that has been very moderate. Still however it hangs upon me a little, tho for about 10. days past I have been able to resume business. I am sensible of your goodness and attention to my dear...
Your favor of June the 4th. with Mr. Eppes’ of May 30. came to my hands only the 8th of July. Consequently they must have been all the month of June getting from Eppington to Richmond, from which last place they would be but 8. or 9. days coming. I mention this as an apology for being so late in acknowleging their reciept. Patsy has written me on the subject of a maid also, but adds that it...
Being to set out for Philadelphia this week, I cannot take my departure without bidding you Adieu by letter. I had much wished it could have been in person, but my occupations here during my stay did not permit it. I had hoped that a contract I had procured between Colo. T.M.R. and his son had secured to the latter Edgehill for a settlement. But some subsequent motives have rendered the former...
I received your favor of Apr. 6. by Jack, and my letter of this date to Mr. Eppes will inform you that he is well under way. If we can keep him out of love, he will be able to go strait forward, and to make good way. I receive with real pleasure your congratulations on my advancement to the venerable corps of grandfathers, and can assure you with truth that I expect from it more felicity than...
I have to acknoledge the reciept of your friendly letter of the 5th instant . I had before heard of the melancholy situation of mrs Skipwith and, whatever reason might suggest as less painful than that was to herself and her friends, yet affection could not learn the event without a shock, and a tender recollection of former scenes on which the curtain is now forever drawn. but we shall join...
I expected mr Eppes would have passed this way on his return from the springs, or I should not have been thus long in expressing to you my sincere sympathies on the loss of our dear friend. your sorrows indeed must be of an higher order: but for no one living had I a more brotherly affection; and a renewal of intercourse with him yourself & family, was one of the objects which brightened most...