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    • Dearborn, Henry

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Documents filtered by: Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Dearborn, Henry"
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I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
From my own knowledge of Majr. Harris’s charactor and services, and from information received from many officers of distinction, I have no doubt of the correctness of the accompanying narative, and I think his claim to rank, as stated by Genl. Ripley, no more than he is clearly entitled to. His highly respectable standing in society, added to his faithfull and distinguished services, form such...
I have recd. your favor of the 7th. Tonningen being included in the Consulate of Mr. Forbes who resides at Hamburg, and being now the real commercial port of that Consulate, it would not consist with what is due to him, to comply with the wishes of Col. Russel. Mr. F. has acquitted himself as one of the most intelligent and active of the Consular Corps; and when not at Tonningen himself, is...
I should not have so long delay’d a reply to your very friendly & polite letter had circumstancies allowed me to mention the time when I could probably have the pleasure of seing you at Monticello . I have Just returned from a visit to my Children in the District of Maine , and I hope Mr s Dearborn & myself shall have the pleasure of seing you in Septem r probably near the end of the month.—...
Will not the late discovery of Treasonable intentions, render it expedient to be more cautious, in appointing Federal characters (especially in the Northern States) to the higher grades in the Army. A conciderable portion of Field officers are Federal, and if a still greater proportion of the Genl. officers should be of that description, would not the active supporters of the Government, and...
1815. Oct. 7. Gen l Dearborne informs me that the plaister of Paris is brought from the head of the Bay of Funday , where it extends all along the coast Windsor is the nearest town. the price pd to the proprietor for the stone is a quarter dollar a ton; and it is quarried & brought to the water edge for three quarter dollars a ton, so that it costs at the water edge a dollar a ton. MS ( DLC );...
The good of the service as well as a due regard to my own charactor, induces me to give you a scetch of the present state of affairs in the 9th. Military District. The Act of Congress for improving the organization of the Staff of the Army, and repealing such parts of the former Laws as come within the purview of the new Act, is concidered as displacing the officers who were appointed under...
Congress have just passed the act adding twenty odd thousand troops to the Military establishment. It provides for two Major Generals & 5 brigadiers. The importance of placing this and the other forces in view, under the best commanders, speaks for itself. Our eyes could not but be turned, on such an occasion, to your qualifications & experience; and I wait for your permission only to name you...
By the request of Genl. Boyd I take the liberty of stating to you my opinion of his conduct at the landing of our Troops in uper Canada near Fort George. On that occasion I had an opportunity of observing the conduct of Genl. Boyd while landing at the head of his Brigade, under a very heavy and galling fire from a large body of British Troops, his conduct & that of Col Scott on that occasion...
The Bearer Mr. Eakin late Pay-Master for this District having requested me to say what I know of his character as a Public Officer—I feel no objection to stating that as far as my acquaintance with Mr. Eakin’s Character extends, he has been attentive to the duties of his Office and has been considered as a capable & correct Officer. Such appears to be the genl. Opinion of the principal...