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Documents filtered by: Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Dearborn, Henry"
Results 1-10 of 66 sorted by editorial placement
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I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...
I have had the honor of receiving your several communications in relation to Manufactories, including your note of the 20th. inst. enclosing a letter from John Webb. Having sent about one hundred & fifty letters to different Gentlemen in various parts of this State in the month of August last, I had presumed that before this time I should have received so much information on the interesting...
The result of our Elections has given our political opponants the intire direction of our State Government for the present year, what use they will make of the power they possess is uncertain, moderation or prudence, belongs not to their political character, they may however; for once, consider it expedient to attempt some restraint on their feelings & dispositions, I fear they will, but if...
I have been favored with yours of the 1st. instant. We have seen nothing yet which sufficiently discloses the course which the Legislature at Boston is to take. The Governors Speech is in a tone somewhat different from his Report last Winter; but what must be thought of the disposition which could thank Osgood for a Sermon, which substitutes for the evangelical spirit he professes to feel, a...
I take the liberty of observing to you that Col Jona Russell of Providence is now here and about sailing for Toninggen, and if no Consul has been appointed for that place Col Russel would be pleased with the appointment, and as his Character is well known to you I presume you will with pleasure confer the appointment desired. If you should think proper to make the appointment, and will please...
I have recd. your favor of the 7th. Tonningen being included in the Consulate of Mr. Forbes who resides at Hamburg, and being now the real commercial port of that Consulate, it would not consist with what is due to him, to comply with the wishes of Col. Russel. Mr. F. has acquitted himself as one of the most intelligent and active of the Consular Corps; and when not at Tonningen himself, is...
With this you will receive a thing called a sermon, in which you will see exhibited a correct picture of New Engld. Federalism, excepting one strong feature, which the painter has not exhibited, viz. a deep rooted hostility to our present sistem of Government but he deserves great credit for having given a correct picture of the veracity, Charity, & candor of his party. Whether we shall...
I have recd. your favor of the 30th. Ult: accompanied by the Discourse of one of your D. D’s. This is the most signal instance I have seen, of a prostitution of the sacred functions. If such be the religion, morality, & citizenship of the federal clergy & colleges, it is not to be wondered that the pious & patriotic people of N. England are forsaking such guides, and rallying to the Republican...
29 November 1810, Boston. Notes that in his official capacity he has had many dealings with the district circuit courts. “The state of society here demands great firmness as well as good legal tallents in our Judges, especially in all questions that have any political bearing.” Cushing should therefore be replaced by “a sound strong independant Character”; suggests that either Gideon Granger...