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I have had the honor of receiving your several communications in relation to Manufactories, including your note of the 20th. inst. enclosing a letter from John Webb. Having sent about one hundred & fifty letters to different Gentlemen in various parts of this State in the month of August last, I had presumed that before this time I should have received so much information on the interesting...
I have recd. your favor of the 7th. Tonningen being included in the Consulate of Mr. Forbes who resides at Hamburg, and being now the real commercial port of that Consulate, it would not consist with what is due to him, to comply with the wishes of Col. Russel. Mr. F. has acquitted himself as one of the most intelligent and active of the Consular Corps; and when not at Tonningen himself, is...
Congress have just passed the act adding twenty odd thousand troops to the Military establishment. It provides for two Major Generals & 5 brigadiers. The importance of placing this and the other forces in view, under the best commanders, speaks for itself. Our eyes could not but be turned, on such an occasion, to your qualifications & experience; and I wait for your permission only to name you...
Your two favors of Decr have lain long without acknowledgment. For some after they came to hand I delayed it in expectation of such further information as to Gen. Smith, as would enable me to judge better of his case; and latterly I considered it as probable that I might have an opportunity, not now expected, of making that as well as other matters, subjects of conversation with you here. I...
Yours of the 6th. came duly to hand. A letter about the same time was recd. by the Dept. of War, from Govr. Strong on the same subject. I desired Mr. Monroe to inclose you a copy of his answer, which will shew you the ground taken with the Govr. What will be his final ground with respect to the Genl. Govt. remains to be seen. In the mean time, and under the peculiarity of the Crisis, we must...
I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
I present to you mr Rives , the bearer of this, an eleve of mine in law and politics. he is able, learned, honest, & orthodox in his principles. being just about to enter on the stage of public life he wishes first to see something more of our country at large. he will be one of the distinguished men of our state , & of the United States . in taking him by the hand while in Boston you will...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...
I have recd. your favor of Sepr. 30. I am glad to find that you have succeeded in producing such apprehensions at Montreal as to prevent reinforcements from that quarter to the posts above. It would have been fortunate if you could have derived such Militia & Volunteer aids from Vermont & Eastward of it, as might have substantially have [ sic ] a like controul on Prevost, and thereby have...
I have been favored with yours of the 1st. instant. We have seen nothing yet which sufficiently discloses the course which the Legislature at Boston is to take. The Governors Speech is in a tone somewhat different from his Report last Winter; but what must be thought of the disposition which could thank Osgood for a Sermon, which substitutes for the evangelical spirit he professes to feel, a...
I had the pleasure of duly receiving yours of the 8th. inclosing a Copy of your son’s oration. In the hurry of the period, I have been able to give it a flying perusal only. But I do not accede to your limitation of its merits so much to an honest zeal. It has claims to a much higher character, with the addition of this laudable feature. I am just on the point of leaving Washington where I...
I have recd. your favor of the 30th. Ult: accompanied by the Discourse of one of your D. D’s. This is the most signal instance I have seen, of a prostitution of the sacred functions. If such be the religion, morality, & citizenship of the federal clergy & colleges, it is not to be wondered that the pious & patriotic people of N. England are forsaking such guides, and rallying to the Republican...
I have just recd. from the Senate their concurrence (23 to 9 votes) in your nomination as a Majr. General. I give you the earliest notice, that without waiting for a formal communication, you may hasten your setting out for Washington. It is understood that your collectorship is to cease only on your being called into service, at which date your military emoluments will commence. In order to...
So entirely are my habits changed from constant labour at my writing table, to constant & active occupation without doors, that it is with difficulty I can resolve to take up my pen. I must do it however as a matter of duty to thank you for the dumb fish you have been so kind as to have forwarded, & which are recieved safely & are found to be excellent. but I do it with pleasure also as it...
Your favor of May 31. was duly recieved, and I join in congratulations with you on the resurrection of republican principles in Massachusets & N. Hampshire , and the hope that the professors of these principles will not again easily be driven off their ground. the federalists, during their short lived ascendancy, have nevertheless, by forcing us from the embargo, have inflicted a wound on our...
The last of your favors which I have to acknowlege is that of the 3d. Ult: from Boston. I am glad to see that you are again at Albany; where your presence will aid much in doing all that can be done for the reputation of the campaign. The lapse of time & the unproductiveness of the laws, contemplating a regular force, and volunteers for an entire year, under federal commissions, compel us to...
I have recieved your favor of Feb. 27. with very great pleasure, and sincerely reciprocate congratulations on the late events. peace was indeed desirable; yet it would not have been as welcome without the successes of New Orleans . these last have established truths too important not to be valued: that the people of Louisiana are sincerely attached to the union: that their city can be...
I ask the favor of you when at Boston to engage for me fourteen tons of plaister of Paris to be delivered at Richmond to mess rs Gibson and Jefferson , my correspondents there, who will on my account pay for the same on delivery whatever sum you shall have agreed on for all costs and charges, the party presenting to them this paper with the sum endorsed by yourself. I will in the mean time...
The bearer of this is mr Thomas M. Randolph half brother of my son in law of that name whom you know. he is proceeding to Harvard college to enter there as a student. having lived at a distance from me, I can say little of him from my personal knolege, but I am authorised by those in whom I have confidence to say that he is a youth of good dispositions & correct conduct. his father was my most...
I write from a place which I visit occasionally, near the New London of this state, 90. miles from Monticello , and where I have not the means of examining whether I have let pass the annual period pass over of saying ‘all’s well’ and ‘how d’ye do’? your letter of came in due time. I had learned by the newspapers the afflicting event it announced, had felt it as your friend, and as the friend...
The inclosed letter will explain to you it’s object, which I have thought would go safest to Boston first under the friendly protection of your cover, and that you would be so good as to add any thing to the superscription which may be necessary to carry it thro’ the post office safely to it’s address. this favor I ask of you. I saw with great joy your nomination to the command of the military...
Being desirous of obtaining for the Department of War, services which I thought you could render with peculiar advantage, & hoping that for a time at least you might consent to step into that Dept. I took the liberty, without a previous communication, for which there was not time, to nominate you as successor to Mr. Monroe who was called back to the Dept. of State. I had not a doubt from all...
I have recd yours of the 24. July. As my esteem and regard have undergone no change, I wish you to be apprized that such was the state of .things, and such the turn they were taking, that the retirement which is the subject of your letter, was pressed by your best personal friends. It was my purpose to have written to you on the occasion, but it was made impossible by a severe illness, from...
I should not have so long delay’d a reply to your very friendly & polite letter had circumstancies allowed me to mention the time when I could probably have the pleasure of seing you at Monticello . I have Just returned from a visit to my Children in the District of Maine , and I hope Mr s Dearborn & myself shall have the pleasure of seing you in Septem r probably near the end of the month.—...
In your letter of the 16 th you were good enough to mention my Son ,— I was inform’d by M r Smith my former principle Clerk that an attempt would probably be made by Pickering to injure the character of my Son as an agent for fortifications, and M r Smith observed that he had mentioned the subject to you & that a postponement was thought advisable of his nomination as an officer in the Army
My Son has enclosed to me your letter of the 20 th ult o and informs me that he had sent your letter to the man it was intended for, and requested him to send the machine to his care at Boston and he, my Son , would ship it to Richmond .—
It is with peculier satisfaction that I can congratulate you on the happy and honorable termination of a war, that was forced upon our Country, by the impolitic and unjust measures of the British Government. but while I rejoice at the close of the war & at the glorious events which terminated our Military conflicts, I feel the most severe mortification & depression, as a Citizan of...
Domestic affliction will, I hope, be admitted as an apology for my not having written to you for so long a time. I mention an apology, because I feel guilty of a negle c t, whenever I allow several months to pass without giving you some indication of my friendship & gratitude. the recollection of having enjoyed a share of your friendship will I trust never cease to Afford me peculiar...
your delightfull retirement does not, I presume, prevent you from casting some occasional glances at the passing events at home & abroad, or from feeling a strong interest in our general concerns, and among other political events the regeneration of four or five of the Northern States, must afford you, & all other honest friends to our Constitution & government, real pleasure; I probably feel...
Your friendly & instructive letter has been received and perused with peculier satisfaction & pleasure.— When people in pursuit of an important object abandon the regular & direct road, and pursue a wrong course a conciderable distance, it is with reluctence they can prevail on themselves to admit the error & tread back the erroneous steps and return to the road they had injudiciously...
on my arrival at Washington from Virginia I enclosed your note to your friends at Richmond concerning the pay for plaster, to my Son in Boston , with a request that he would procure the plaster & have it sent to Richmond
I had this day the pleasure of receiving your very freindly and highly esteem’d letter of the 16 th I am very glad that the fish arrived safe and was satisfactory in quality.— The Tories in this quarter have been making great exartions to induce their subordinate, deceived, adherents, to believe that M r Madison is intitled to their confidence, and they effect to believe that he will abandon...
If no new causes of delay occur I we shall set out tomorrow morning for Monticello . I wrote to M r Rodney immediately after I was honored with your friendly letter , and expected on my arrival at Wilmington that he would have Joined me at this place & proceeded on with us, but his official, or professional, ingagements disappointed me of the pleasure of his company. I am now fear that my...
From my own knowledge of Majr. Harris’s charactor and services, and from information received from many officers of distinction, I have no doubt of the correctness of the accompanying narative, and I think his claim to rank, as stated by Genl. Ripley, no more than he is clearly entitled to. His highly respectable standing in society, added to his faithfull and distinguished services, form such...
I was the last evening honored with your letter of the 6th. Inst. Why Genl. Smyth has not thought it expedient to request a Court of Enquirey, I am at a loss to conjecture, the method he has prefered, towit, a newspaper defence & Justification, is unusual in such cases, and not calculated to produce a satisfactory result. I had presumed that his friends would advise him to request a regular...
Will not the late discovery of Treasonable intentions, render it expedient to be more cautious, in appointing Federal characters (especially in the Northern States) to the higher grades in the Army. A conciderable portion of Field officers are Federal, and if a still greater proportion of the Genl. officers should be of that description, would not the active supporters of the Government, and...
The good of the service as well as a due regard to my own charactor, induces me to give you a scetch of the present state of affairs in the 9th. Military District. The Act of Congress for improving the organization of the Staff of the Army, and repealing such parts of the former Laws as come within the purview of the new Act, is concidered as displacing the officers who were appointed under...
By the request of Genl. Boyd I take the liberty of stating to you my opinion of his conduct at the landing of our Troops in uper Canada near Fort George. On that occasion I had an opportunity of observing the conduct of Genl. Boyd while landing at the head of his Brigade, under a very heavy and galling fire from a large body of British Troops, his conduct & that of Col Scott on that occasion...
The Bearer Mr. Eakin late Pay-Master for this District having requested me to say what I know of his character as a Public Officer—I feel no objection to stating that as far as my acquaintance with Mr. Eakin’s Character extends, he has been attentive to the duties of his Office and has been considered as a capable & correct Officer. Such appears to be the genl. Opinion of the principal...
As the ultimate question in relation to war must soon be decided, and it may be concidered expedient to appoint a Collector for this place, I take the liberty of observing that as you were pleased to mention to me, the propriety, (if practicable,) of placing the Collectorship in such hands as would render it convenient to restore me to that place, in the event of a short war, I have prevailed...
I was this day honored with your letter of the 9th. inst. having been placed in a very unpleasant situation I have endeavored to make the best arrangements for the ultimate success of our Army, that circumstancies permit, the perticular circumstancies which have occasioned the most unfortunate imbarrasments, were my having no orders or directions in relation to uper Canada, (which I had...
As the number of additional Majr. Genels. recently appointed will enable the Executive to select such as may be best qualified for the most important commands, I hope the power will be exercised freely, and in such maner as the public good may require, regarding no other concideration than that of the qualities of the respective officers, and be assured Sir that no one will more readily &...
Our political opponents in, and out, of the Legislature, are endeavouring to inspire as general an opposition to the measures of the Genl. Government as possible, how far they will venture toward an open resistence, is uncertain, nothing but their fears will prevent their going all lengths. It is said that they have not received so satisfactory information from New York, as they had expected....
With this you will receive a thing called a sermon, in which you will see exhibited a correct picture of New Engld. Federalism, excepting one strong feature, which the painter has not exhibited, viz. a deep rooted hostility to our present sistem of Government but he deserves great credit for having given a correct picture of the veracity, Charity, & candor of his party. Whether we shall...
Permit me to observe that I concider it of the utmost importance that improvements should be effected as soon as may be in the Staff Departments of the Army, and especially in that of the Quartr. Mastr. Genl. and it is indispen[s]able that the Q, M, G, should be a real man of business, in addition to good talents, general information & integrity, he should be habitually industrious, energetic...
By the direction of the Secretary of War I am at this place; and having visited the principal posts I consider it my duty, in the absence of the Secretary of war, to state to you the situation of the important posts in the vicinity of this City. The works are strong and extensive, and with suitable garrisons are well calculated for the defence of the Harbour and City; but the number of Troops...
I have been honored with your letter of the 8th. Inst. It is peculierly gratifying in my present situation, to be assured that your esteem & regard for me has undergone no change, and that you are persuaded that I shall not lose in any respect by the effect of time or truth. But at my time of life it could hardly be expected that I should quietly acquiesce in so unusual and so unprese[de]nted...
The Secretary of war has undoubtedly informed you of the unfortunate event at Niagara. It undoubtedly originated with two or three indiscreet ardent spirits, whose political and personal feelings could not brook the Idea of having any share of the honour of an effective movement attached to those officers and men that were more immediately under the direction of the U. S. But Genl. Van...
Having written a letter to the Secretary of War, in which I have expressed a readiness to enter on the duties of my military appointment, I take the liberty, from the conversations that have passed on the subject, of reminding you, that I shall take it for granted, that the office of collector at Boston, will be kept open until war be actually commenced, or abandoned for the present and that...
As the principal object of the command, which may be confided to my direction, will probably be the conquest of Lower Canada, it may not be improper for me to Suggest the outlines of what occurs to my mind, in relation to principal points of attack, the probable means of defense, and the necessary force for rendering Success as certain, as the usual exigencies of War will admit; taking into...