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    • Dearborn, Henry

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Documents filtered by: Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Dearborn, Henry"
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on my arrival at Washington from Virginia I enclosed your note to your friends at Richmond concerning the pay for plaster, to my Son in Boston , with a request that he would procure the plaster & have it sent to Richmond
From my own knowledge of Majr. Harris’s charactor and services, and from information received from many officers of distinction, I have no doubt of the correctness of the accompanying narative, and I think his claim to rank, as stated by Genl. Ripley, no more than he is clearly entitled to. His highly respectable standing in society, added to his faithfull and distinguished services, form such...
1815. Oct. 7. Gen l Dearborne informs me that the plaister of Paris is brought from the head of the Bay of Funday , where it extends all along the coast Windsor is the nearest town. the price pd to the proprietor for the stone is a quarter dollar a ton; and it is quarried & brought to the water edge for three quarter dollars a ton, so that it costs at the water edge a dollar a ton. MS ( DLC );...
I ask the favor of you when at Boston to engage for me fourteen tons of plaister of Paris to be delivered at Richmond to mess rs Gibson and Jefferson , my correspondents there, who will on my account pay for the same on delivery whatever sum you shall have agreed on for all costs and charges, the party presenting to them this paper with the sum endorsed by yourself. I will in the mean time...
§ From Henry Dearborn. 29 September 1815, Farrese Inn, Green Spring. “Mrs. Dearborn & myself are on our way to Monticello, we intended paying our respects to yourself and Mrs Madison previous to our visit at Monticello, but being anxious to reach the end of our journey while the good weather continues & before the roads became worse, we have concluded to pass on, and to take the liberty of...
If no new causes of delay occur I we shall set out tomorrow morning for Monticello . I wrote to M r Rodney immediately after I was honored with your friendly letter , and expected on my arrival at Wilmington that he would have Joined me at this place & proceeded on with us, but his official, or professional, ingagements disappointed me of the pleasure of his company. I am now fear that my...
I should not have so long delay’d a reply to your very friendly & polite letter had circumstancies allowed me to mention the time when I could probably have the pleasure of seing you at Monticello . I have Just returned from a visit to my Children in the District of Maine , and I hope Mr s Dearborn & myself shall have the pleasure of seing you in Septem r probably near the end of the month.—...
I have recieved your favor of Feb. 27. with very great pleasure, and sincerely reciprocate congratulations on the late events. peace was indeed desirable; yet it would not have been as welcome without the successes of New Orleans . these last have established truths too important not to be valued: that the people of Louisiana are sincerely attached to the union: that their city can be...
Being desirous of obtaining for the Department of War, services which I thought you could render with peculiar advantage, & hoping that for a time at least you might consent to step into that Dept. I took the liberty, without a previous communication, for which there was not time, to nominate you as successor to Mr. Monroe who was called back to the Dept. of State. I had not a doubt from all...
It is with peculier satisfaction that I can congratulate you on the happy and honorable termination of a war, that was forced upon our Country, by the impolitic and unjust measures of the British Government. but while I rejoice at the close of the war & at the glorious events which terminated our Military conflicts, I feel the most severe mortification & depression, as a Citizan of...