You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Madison Presidency
  • Correspondent

    • Dearborn, Henry

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 5

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 4

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Dearborn, Henry"
Results 1-10 of 66 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
The result of our Elections has given our political opponants the intire direction of our State Government for the present year, what use they will make of the power they possess is uncertain, moderation or prudence, belongs not to their political character, they may however; for once, consider it expedient to attempt some restraint on their feelings & dispositions, I fear they will, but if...
So entirely are my habits changed from constant labour at my writing table, to constant & active occupation without doors, that it is with difficulty I can resolve to take up my pen. I must do it however as a matter of duty to thank you for the dumb fish you have been so kind as to have forwarded, & which are recieved safely & are found to be excellent. but I do it with pleasure also as it...
I have been favored with yours of the 1st. instant. We have seen nothing yet which sufficiently discloses the course which the Legislature at Boston is to take. The Governors Speech is in a tone somewhat different from his Report last Winter; but what must be thought of the disposition which could thank Osgood for a Sermon, which substitutes for the evangelical spirit he professes to feel, a...
I had this day the pleasure of receiving your very freindly and highly esteem’d letter of the 16 th I am very glad that the fish arrived safe and was satisfactory in quality.— The Tories in this quarter have been making great exartions to induce their subordinate, deceived, adherents, to believe that M r Madison is intitled to their confidence, and they effect to believe that he will abandon...
In your letter of the 16 th you were good enough to mention my Son ,— I was inform’d by M r Smith my former principle Clerk that an attempt would probably be made by Pickering to injure the character of my Son as an agent for fortifications, and M r Smith observed that he had mentioned the subject to you & that a postponement was thought advisable of his nomination as an officer in the Army
The bearer of this is mr Thomas M. Randolph half brother of my son in law of that name whom you know. he is proceeding to Harvard college to enter there as a student. having lived at a distance from me, I can say little of him from my personal knolege, but I am authorised by those in whom I have confidence to say that he is a youth of good dispositions & correct conduct. his father was my most...
I take the liberty of observing to you that Col Jona Russell of Providence is now here and about sailing for Toninggen, and if no Consul has been appointed for that place Col Russel would be pleased with the appointment, and as his Character is well known to you I presume you will with pleasure confer the appointment desired. If you should think proper to make the appointment, and will please...
I have recd. your favor of the 7th. Tonningen being included in the Consulate of Mr. Forbes who resides at Hamburg, and being now the real commercial port of that Consulate, it would not consist with what is due to him, to comply with the wishes of Col. Russel. Mr. F. has acquitted himself as one of the most intelligent and active of the Consular Corps; and when not at Tonningen himself, is...
I received, but yesterday your Letter of the 30th of August. Convinced of the Wisdom and Sound Policy of this Measure of Government, I accept with Pleasure your Commission: and will execute it to the best of my Capacity and in as Short a time as possible. My field of Investigation is however so narrow the very little can be can be expected from, Sir your / humble Servant PHC : Charles Roberts...
In undertaking to give you an account of the Manafactories in this neighbourhood I am apprehensive, I have, engaged more than I shall be able to perform to your satisfaction. From my earliest Recollection, it has been a common observation that within two or three years, after a general Peace in Europe, American Commerce has declined to such a degree as to introduce Distress among the People...