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I herewith enclose a letter which I have received from Messrs. Mackay & Dixey. The subject appears to be of some moment, and the objects may probably be attained, by an alteration in the bill about to be brought forward pursuant to your report on ways & means, if you do not dissaprove of it. I am still confined to my lodgings and shall be happy to speak with you on the subject. Another letter...
Some skirmishing having begun in the Gazette of the U States respecting Mr. Freneau’s receiving a salary from Government —I mentioned in conversation with a Friend all that I knew of the matter, and among other things, but without naming you, the information you had given me concerning Mr. Madison’s negotiation with Freneau. Upon this he founded a very pointed attack upon Mr Freneau & Mr....
Having been absent with my family on a visit to Staten Island and to the seashore, I did not receive, so soon as I otherwise should, your letter of the 15th. That Mr. Jefferson proposed to Freneau to repair to Philadelphia, and act in his department as interpreter of the French language, and that, subsequently thereto, a negotiation was had & completed between Mr. Madison and the latter to...
Elizabethtown [ New Jersey ] June 26, 1794 . “Judge Symmes, who left this place yesterday for Philadelphia by the way of Morristown, requested me to acquaint you that in two or three days he should be at your office to obtain the Deed for the Miami lands. The delay of this business, on one account or another, has been so much beyond what was foreseen, as to occasion much uneasiness with many...
Elizabethtown [ New Jersey ] August 9, 1794 . “Will you be so obliging as to turn your attention immediately to the subject of Judge Symmes’s purchase between the Miamis, in order to have the different writings prepared for executing upon his arrival in Philadelphia, which will be in four or five days? …” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Dayton was a member of the House of...
[ New York, January 4, 1796. On January 15, 1796, Dayton wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of the 4th is before me.” Letter not found. ] Dayton, a veteran of the American Revolution, had served in the New Jersey Assembly in 1786, 1787, and 1790 and was a Federalist member of the House of Representatives from 1791 to 1799. Dayton was Speaker of the House from March 4, 1795, to March 3, 1799.
Philadelphia, January 15, 1796. “Your letter of the 4th is before me.… There cannot, I presume, exist a doubt as to my right to a portion of the Certificates alluded to in your letter.… Mr Stevens the elder declared before his death to my father that he would transfer them to me.… The short Interrogatory respecting our political prospect with which you conclude your letter, cannot be answered...
I cannot forbear my dear friend to congratulate you on your appointment to a seat in the Senate, altho it is impossible for me not to lament your separation from the House of Representatives where you could have been more useful. I know you too well to suppose that you can regard with indifference the preparations which are making for the approaching election of a President. Is not the success...
This will be delivered to you by a young man who was going to transact some business up the North river, & whom, since writing the other letter, I have engaged to call upon you with it, & to bring me your answer. Every moments reflection serves only to impress me more with the importance of our fixing upon some plan of cooperation to defeat the designs of Mr. J——’s friends. If Mr. A. cannot...
Last evening, my dear sir, I had the pleasure to receive your favours of the 12th. & 13th. insts. accept for them and for your friendly congratulation on my appointment to a seat in the senate, my sincere acknowledgments. Believe me, that event, however grateful to my friends, is not pleasing to me. I preferred a seat in the house to any public station whatever, but I had firmly decided to...
[ Elizabethtown, New Jersey, July 27, 1798. On August 6, 1798, Hamilton wrote to Dayton : “I received at Philadelphia your letter of the 27th of July.” Letter not found. ]
I received at Philadelphia your letter of the 27th of July the answer to which has been delayed by excessive occupation. You know, I trust, sufficiently my sentiments of you, not to need being told how much pleasure your appointment gave me, and how highly I value the confidence you express in me. It will probably be unexpected to you to be told that I am not yet in the exercise of the...
The enclosed letter to Major Ford directs him to take the command of some detachments of Artillerists which have been ordered to march as auxiliaries to the Volunteers under Mc:Pherson destined against the Northampton Insurgents. Be so good as to have it forwarded by an expeditious and certain conveyance by express if none other equally prompt and certain offers. Do me the favor also to inform...
Your favor dated the 18th. was received this morning. The letter accompanying it for Majr. Ford was immediately sent to the Post office at Newark, from whence a Mail goes this afternoon to Morris. In answer to your enquiry respecting the Major’s character, I can assure you that he has ever been considered a good officer, and that I know him to be perfectly sound, correct & firm in his...
Elizabethtown [ New Jersey ] March 22, 1799 . “Your letter addressed to Major Ford reached the Post office in Newark a few minutes after the mail for Morris was sent off.… I was compelled to hire an express for 3 & ½ Dollars who delivered the letter to the Major this morng & brought back from him the enclosed to you.” ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter,...
An Accurate view of the internal situation of the UStates presents many discouraging reflections to the enlightened friends of our Government and country. Notwithstanding the unexampled success of our public measures at home and abroad—notwithstanding the instructive comments afforded by the disastrous & disgusting scenes of the french Revolution, public opinion has not been...
I write to you in confidence, & altho’ in the language, yet not in the temper of complaint. A practice has prevailed with some of the Regts. in your Division of drawing mony & rations on acct. without regular rolls & returns. This, I am sure, needs only to be known by you in order to be reprobated & corrected, for it’s tendency is most pernicious not only in encouraging indolence, inattention...
New York, March 4, 1803. “The foregoing are Copies of our letters to Meeker Denman & Co on the subject of Insurance.…” AL , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Lawrence and Dayton were partners in a mercantile firm at 94 Greenwich Street, New York City. Copies, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. This letter and its enclosures, which concern the case of Lawrence and Dayton v Columbian...
I want to have with you a free & confidential conversation on a point very important to us all. Will you do me the favour to take with me tomorrow a family Dinner at two oClock? Or if this is not convenient will you give me leave to call at your Lodgings tomorrow Evening six oClock? Yrs. truly ALS , Joseph Hopkinson Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. A veteran of the...
Some advices are just received from England which add to the favourable complexion of affairs. I wish much to see you for half an hour before you go to Congress. You will find me at the Office. Yrs. truly ALS , Joseph Hopkinson Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
I thank you for your letter of the , and the friendly disposition it manifests. As to Frances’s Memorial it is my wish that its course to the house may meet with no obstruction. It is now returned. I never knew (though I have suspected) the channel through which certain papers went to the hands of Callender . I should be glad to ascertain it— quantum valiat . In regard to France my Opinion is...
[ Philadelphia, March 25, 1798. On March 30, 1798, Hamilton wrote to Dayton : “Your letter of the 25th gave me much pleasure.” Letter not found. ] Printed in this volume.
Your letter of the 25th gave me much pleasure. The communication respecting certain papers is sufficient till we meet. Our coincidence in opinion on public affairs was anticipated. Yet I am glad to hear it from yourself. I preferred the idea of a “ suspension of the Treaties” because it is a cooler and less unpopular mode of doing the same thing as to consider them as at an end. No declaration...
Forseeing that Mrs. Dayton’s illness & other unavoidable causes of detention at home would prevent me from visiting N. York very soon, I was anxious to see and converse with you in this place upon your passage to, or from Philadelphia, relatively to some military arrangements. One, & not the least important, object of attention is to give efficacy to the third section of the provisional army...
I have received your letter of the . Col Smith had made a previous representation to me. I have the matter under consideration, and shall speedily be able to judge what is proper to be done. As yet, if we may trust pretty direct accounts, our gains in the Legislature nearly ballance our losses . Should this prove to be the case Mr. Jefferson and his allies have too early indulged their puerile...
New York, March 30, 1802. Seeks Dayton’s aid for client soliciting “the interposition of our Government with the Court of Spain for obtaining restitution of a vessel & Cargo seized in South America.” ALS , Joseph Hopkinson Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
I intended to have crossed to N York this morning in compy. with Colo: Ogden for the purpose of suggesting to you some alterations very important to the military service both in the arrangements of the relative ranks of the Company officers, & of the recruiting districts. Indisposition has prevented me, but the Colonel persists in the intention. We have perfectly concurred in the alterations...
Acquainted with Capt. Joel Davis of your State, I take the liberty of recommending him to you for the command of a compy. in the eventual army. He is active, temperate and, I believe, in every respect well qualified for that charge and station. His zeal in support of our Government & it’s Administration knows no bounds and furnishes a sure ground of reliance upon him in any critical emergency....
Pursuant to your request I have subjoined a list of articles which will be wanted for the 11th. 12th. & 13th. United States Regts. to enable them to erect huts & provide fuel for the ensuing winter. This estimate is the result not merely of my own reflections, but of a conversation with the Commanding officers of two of the Regts. upon the subject; and I am persuaded that any supply short of...
I have been informed that the bill for funding the Continental debt which has passed the House of Representatives and is at present under consideration & discussion in the Senate, provides for the appointment of a Commissioner in each state to aid in carrying the system into execution. I take the liberty, sir, of addressing you upon the subject, and of offering myself as a candidate for that...
Letter not found: from Jonathan Dayton, 22 June 1790. Letter listed in American Clipper, January 1943.
Having delivered to the Secretary of the Treasury, pursuant to the 2nd Section of the Act of Congress entitled “An Act authorizing the grant & conveyance of certain lands to John Cleves Symmes & his associates,” military warrants sufficient to pay for One hundred & six thousand eight hundred & fifty seven acres of land, I am prepared, as Agent for, & the associate of, said Symmes to carry into...
In reply to your letter of this date, the President of the United States directs me to inform you, that he is ready to do, at any time, whatever may depend on him towards completing the “grant and conveyance of certain lands to John Cleves Symmes and his associates,” in conformity to An Act of the Legislature passed during the last session of Congress. But as the President understands that...
The House of Representatives have attended to your communication respecting the state of our Country, with all the sensibility that the contemplation of the subject, and a sense of duty can inspire. We are gratified by the information, that measure calculated to ensure a continuance of the friendship of the Indians, and to maintain the tranquility of the Western frontier, have been adopted;...
I am directed by Colo: Dayton to inform your excellency that the enemy landed this night at 12 oClock, from the best intelligence four or five Thousand men & Twelve field pieces, & it is his conjecture they intend to penetrate into the country. I am your excelly’s most hum. Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have the honour and happiness of communicating to your Excellency the agreable and important news of the capture of the whole Island of Minorca the 17th of February by our allies and of the treaty offensive and defensive between France and the States of Holland which has been lately concluded. These events we learn from a vessel which has just arrived in a short passage from Lisbon and from...
I have received your Letter without Date with a packet from Sir Hy Clinton. You do not inform the Channel thro which you have obtained the important Intelligence you mention—but from the positive Manner in which you transmit it, I hope it may be depended on. It has been rumoured to me that a large Fleet has lately been seen near the Hook—but who they are or from whence they arrive is not...
Upon the return of Colonel Stewart to Camp, I put into his hands to be delivered to your Excellency the latest English and New York papers which I could collect. I have now the honor of enclosing to your Excellency the hand bill of yesterday relating to the engagement upon the 12th Ultimo, between the French and English fleets, lest report might have given to the story a degree of truth and...
I had the honour of writing to your Excellency the 13th and of enclosing the latest English papers for your Excellency’s perusal. I now take advantage of Mr Skinner’s departure for the army to acquaint your Excellency with such circumstances as have come with in my knowledge relating to the enemy, as well as to forward the papers of the 15th & yesterday. A fleet of about forty sail of...
I have received your Letter of the 18th by Mr Skinner, from whom I have also learnt that a flag which lately arrived with Prisoners from New York, has been detained in conformity to my Orders on that subject, until further directions should be received; in which you have acted very properly. But you will on the receipt of this, suffer the flag to return, informing the Officer that no more...
Mr Skinner, whose immediate departure did not afford me an opportunity of writing upon the subject, has without doubt reported to your Excellency the circumstance of the detention of Mr Lenox Depy Commissary of naval prisoners, his vessel and the hands as prisoners, agreable to your Excellency’s orders communicated by a letter to Colonel Dayton some time since. They will be continued at this...
I have the honor to inform your Excellency that Lieut. MacDonald formerly of the 71st British but last of the King’s Orange Rangers has made his escape from New York by way of Staaten Island to this post. He tells me that the injury which has been done him in point of rank, the ill treatment he has received from his Colonel and his attachment to America & her cause, joined to the consideration...
Passports having been granted by me for Genl Losberg to send out of N. York One Q. Master & two Noncommissioned Officers havg charge of Money Cloathg & medicine for the Use of the Hessian prisoners in Phila.—You will receive them at the post of Elizabeth Town, & suffer them to pass on by the nearest Rout to philadelphia, agreable to the Tenor & strict Expression of their Permission, which they...
Your Excellency’s letter of the 24th to Colonel Dayton as it very nearly affected me by declaring your Excellency’s displeasure and disapprobation of my conduct was communicated to me by him. From the mistaken report which appears to have been made to your Excellency upon this occasion I should be justly censured for a deviation from, and disobedience of, my orders; but, I trust, when every...
Letter not found. 25 May 1802. Acknowledged in Daniel Brent to Dayton, 29 May 1802 (DNA: RG 59, DL, vol. 14). Requests a copy of the acts of the second session of the Seventh Congress and a copy of the agreement between the U.S. and Georgia. Brent replied that “when the printing is compleated which is to form the first part of the 6th. Volume of the laws of the United States, and to comp[r]ise...
For the President, in the most perfect confidence. Never were any men more completely confounded, than were a certain description of politicians, to whom I have heretofore alluded, upon the appearance of the Proclamation, for restoring the intercourse between the U. States & Territories of Britain. The commerce, the honor, & the prosperity of their country were with them, at best, but...
In the latter end of the year 1808, & Spring of 1809, two anonymous letters were addressed, one to the then Secy. of State, the other to the P. of the U. S. They related to a projected severance of the Union, brought to the knowledge of the writer, which was to be undertaken in case of a rupture with G. B. under the managemt. of men of high standing; but was obviated for the time by the...
I received yesterday by mail, a letter without signature, which, from it’s general & particular character, it’s tenour, & it’s allusions, must be presumed to have come from the President of the United States. The letters therein alluded to, & stated to have been addressed to the Secretary of State, & to the President successively in 1808 & 1809 were never sent by me. It would seem however,...
Your political enemies are taking every possible advantage of our unaccountable disasters at Detroit, to render your Presidency unpopular, & your cabinet Council odious & contemptible. This is not doing by Federalists alone, but with equal zeal, tho’ greater caution by “the Democratic Republicans .” The great object of the former is to remove the Chief magistracy, not from you only, but from...
The writer of this did not intend to follow up the late communication with any other, until he learned thro’ the channell he had pointed out, whether they were acceptable, but considerations, not only personal to yourself, but important to the welfare of our country have impelled him so far to change his intention. The Assembly of the Notables (as they are ludicrously called) convened lately...