Alexander Hamilton Papers
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To Alexander Hamilton from Jonathan Dayton, [7–8 April 1792]

From Jonathan Dayton1

Thursday noon [April, 7–8, 1792]

Dr. Sir,

I herewith enclose a letter which I have received from Messrs. Mackay & Dixey.2 The subject appears to be of some moment, and the objects may probably be attained, by an alteration in the bill about to be brought forward pursuant to your report on ways & means,3 if you do not dissaprove of it. I am still confined to my lodgings and shall be happy to speak with you on the subject.

Another letter respecting the claim of Perry & Hayes,4 is also enclosed. Be so good as to inform me whether you have yet made, or prepared, your re⟨port⟩ on that matter.

With very sincere esteem   Yours

Jona: Dayton

P.S. Be pleased to return the letters.

ALS, MS Division, New York Public Library.

1Dayton was a Federalist member of the House of Representatives from New Jersey.

2Mackay and Dixey was a Staten Island firm that specialized in taking orders for printing and bleaching cloth. The Dayton family firm in Elizabeth, New Jersey, was in the same business (Rita Susswein Gottesman, “The Arts and Crafts in New York, 1777–1779,” Collections of the New-York Historical Society, LXXXI [New York, 1954], 300).

3This is a reference to H’s “Report Relative to the Additional Supplies for the Ensuing Year,” March 16, 1792. On April 7, 1792, the House of Representatives adopted several resolutions concerning this report and appointed a committee to bring in a bill (Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 567–69). Although the bill in question was concerned with securing increased revenues to supply the western expedition, Dayton hoped that it might be amended in such a fashion as to allow the importation of foreign cotton. Such an amendment was actually proposed, but it was defeated (Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 570, 575, 584; Annals of Congress, III description begins The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States; with an Appendix, Containing Important State Papers and Public Documents, and All the Laws of a Public Nature (Washington, 1834–1849). description ends , 560–62; 1 Stat. description begins The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America (Boston, 1845). description ends 259–63).

4On February 17, 1790, “A petition of James Perry and Thomas Hayes, subjects of the King of Great Britain, was presented to the House and read, praying to receive compensation for sundry articles of property, which were seized and taken from them in the State of New Jersey, during the war, for the use of the Army of the United States.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.” (Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 160.)

H did not report on this petition (H to Frederick A. C. Muhlenberg, January 5, 1795).

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