Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Davies, William"
Results 61-93 of 93 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 2
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I am often applied to by seamen belonging to Coasting vessels for protections, alledging that the British Ships of War impress them within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States. I have never been able to ascertain that such practice actually exists; but the transaction stated in the enclosed deposition seems to be so irregular, that I think it proper to be communicated. I have...
Upon viewing the troops of the Virginia Line this morning I find that they are almost totally destitute of Cloathing that is even necessary for the present season in consequence of which upwards of one third of them are renderd at present unfit for service. The importance of present exertions need not be pen’d as I flatter myself you must already be convinced of the necessity of them. You will...
War Office [ Richmond ], 10 Apr. 1781 . Many men already discharged from the army have arrears in pay due them. “It is hard upon these men to lose their pay, and it is exceedingly troublesome to this office, to the Auditors and to your Excellency, for the adjustment of each man’s claim to be thrown individually upon us. I would therefore submit it to your Excellency, whether it will not be...
Col. Th. M. Randolph has a large flat or lighter, which he tells me can go sixteen miles above his house . It would carry off a great deal of stores if we had it, and I am very apprehensive without it we shall lose a great deal. I am but little acquainted with him, otherwise should make the request myself. I would therefore submit it to your Excellency whether you would think it proper to...
Richmond, 13 May 1781 . Disapproves of continuing the work at Point of Fork; suggests Staunton as a more secure location. “I wish you cou’d be every where, the Governor does not stay here , your presence is much wanted. … The Governor is the best man in the world and, if I mistake not, open to conviction. Were you to use your influence with him I think he might be prevailed on to give up this...
Baron Steuben having desired that all Issues and Furnitures from us to the Continent might be on his Order while here, I immediately on Receipt of your Letter sent it down to the Baron; he was just set out to Hoods. I therefore have given an Order to Mr. Armistead to deliver the Materials to the Person attending for you that they may be making up and paying due Attention to the Barons Request....
Captain Young, the Quartermaster general of the state, who has just arrived, informs me that he saw at Edentown about 30 exceeding fine cannon of 18s and 24s. He asked the Naval officer, whose they were, who informed him they were the property of the State of Virginia, thrown out of a French vessel, who carried the remainder of them to South quay. As I have no return of any thing of the kind,...
In answer to your Excellency’s favor of yesterday , I would observe that it is necessary the good arms and prepared ammunition should continue here to be issued to the militia, as they arrive. If there should be danger, which I do not conceive there is at present, the arms &c. may be removed in boats, of which I have a number collected. There is a considerable quantity of loose ammunition...
The plan propos’d by Mr. Ross for the building of Mr. Andersons shop I think a good one. Wou’d not 20 insted of 28 feet [be] wide enough? I dont know whether it wou’d not be best to have a store house at one end of the Shop. There is but one reason can operate against it, that is fire. Mr. Ford informs me that you will be at the point of fork this evening. Will you be so good as to take this...
Your favors of March 8th and 11th. have remained so long unanswered from a constant Hurry of Business, but orders were immediately given for executing your requisitions as far as could be. Mr. Armistead tells me he has procured you one set of Shoemaker Tools, being the whole to be found here which now go to you; He sends also the Deer skins which on receipt of your Letter on that Subject I had...
The Sixth of October last I Delivered to Mr. Joseph Hawkins Comasery at the Barracks 139 ℔ of mutten at 4. Dollars pr. pound, which I agree’d with him for a few Days before, for which I took a receit of Mr. John Tomas his assistant, Mr. Hawkins being some-where about The Store. I wated with patience as no money was to be had, and between the 5th. and 10th. March notis was given For Every body...
I am informed a considerable number of public papers, brimstone and other articles are lying round the works at Westham, many of them very little damaged. I cannot well spare any body from this side to collect them, but think it my duty to give your Excellency the information. The number of Hanover militia on the other side the river, is so considerable as to take the whole of the good arms. I...
I have just received a letter from Baron Steuben informing me that at the date of it (the 23d) he was on his way to the old Court house to fit the new recruits for the feild, and supposing it might be in your power to aid them with some articles necessary for them. If any thing can be done by the state in this way I think it will be of essential good, as, wherever these recruits are to be...
The badness of the weather has prevented my return to Richmond today. I am, however, so firmly persuaded of the enemy’s intentions up the rivers, that I cannot refrain from renewing my request for the impressment of a number of waggons not only for the removal of the stores at Petersburg and Chesterfield, which amount to at least 150 waggon loads, but also for the removal of the cannon at...
Not having that kind of knolege of the transactions of the artificers which is acquired by personal inspection, we think it will be better that a determination on the above point should be suspended until Colo. Davies shall become so far acquainted with them as will enable him to form a judgment on the subject. RC (Paul C. Richards Autographs, Brookline, Massachusetts, 1969); unaddressed, but...
The Bearers of your Letters have unfortunately called on me generally in the afternoon when it is impossible to consult the Council, and of course to answer you, which occasions a delay of answer. This was the case with Dr. Munro. I now inclose you an order for the medicine. We can furnish you with about 400 yds. of a coarse woolen which may be made to answer the purpose of blankets in the...
The unsecure situation of the publick Stores in your County makes it necessary that Steps should be immediately taken to put them out of the power of the enemy. The grain perhaps, it would be better to sell, the cattle possibly might be driven to Wilmington or Philadelphia but an escort ought to be sent with them till they shall have passed Worcester and Sussex Counties. The preservation of...
Mr. Robertson receives a warrant for £2500, and an order for a tierce of rice from our stock. We have none of the other articles desired, but am in hopes he may be able to purchase them. As to the soap from the Barracks I imagine the requisition to the commissary general of issues would go more properly from yourself, as it is continental property. Shoud any difficulty occur in this, Genl....
I had the honor of addressing your Excellency in two letters last week upon the subject of some supplies in the cloathing department. I have not yet been favored with your answer, altho’ Captain Peyton informs me you have been kind enough to give the necessary orders for the money, and that one sett of shoemakers’ tools are procured. I would wish to be informed of your Excellency’s intentions...
I beg leave to represent to your Excellency the absolute necessity of appointing one of the officers of the new state regiment to do the duty of Town major at this place. It is impossible for the duties of this office to be done without confusion, if the Commissioner’s attention is perpetually distracted with orders for provision for this man, and rum for another, and a pair of shoes for a...
By our present Situation Your Excellency will find it highly Necessary, that all kind of Intrenching Tools, as well for the defensive as offensive Operations, should be got immediatly ready. I take therefore the Liberty to propose what Kind and Quantity of Tools [there] may be Occasion for, 800 Spades 400 Common Axes 200 Broad and Grubbing Hoes 100 Pick Axes 300 Fashine Knifes and smal...
Inclosed I transmit copies of the resolution of Congress and the opinion of the board of war of this state with your Excellency’s order respecting Captain Peyton the sub or state clothier. I think there has not yet been much reason to apprehend so great an over proportion of cloathing would be in his hands, as to induce the Continental Cloathier General to direct a distribution of it to other...
Agreeable to your Instructions I have sent on four hundred stand of arms. The Waggon that brought your Marque to Colo. Lewis’s went off before I received your Letter which was this morning. Carver lost two of his horses last night, however, Mr. Southall procured Waggons for the purpose. Your Marque I have paid particular attention to. I have reserved six shirts, one I believe Colo. St[arke]...
As the Virginia commissioner charged with settling the state’s accounts with the Union, William Davies had been in New York since early 1789 arranging and presenting vouchers and other evidence of the Virginia expenditures during the war. In conducting this business the commissioner worked closely with the Virginia delegation in Congress, particularly with JM, who was “zealous on this subject”...
I am directed by the board of arrangement to lay the inclosed representation before your Excellency. They are not actuated by any other motives than a regard to their own rights as officers, and the general interest of the service. Upon similar pretensions General Scott might have retired when General Weedon was irregularly placed over his head; and General Muhlenberg, who was in the same...
I was desired by the Baron before his leaving town to lay before your Excellency, an extract of a letter from General Greene, which unintentionally he omitted to present to you yesterday, altho’ I think he said he had conversed with you on this subject. His great anxiety for an immediate supply of ammunition to be forwarded on to General Greene has induced him to press this matter with so much...
I found upon my return hither that all the troops, that marched from hence upon the arrival of the enemy, had by order of Baron Steuben come back to this station, from their utter inability to keep the field, from the want of almost every species of cloathing. Many men have not a remnant of cloathing larger than a good napkin to cover their nakedness, and a number of these are dependent upon...
Your several favors came to hand yesterday, but neither the tools nor the taylors are yet arrived. I never knew whose property the tools were, whether public or private, and the taylors, belonging to the State Garrison regiment, are countermanded by Major McGill, as Mr. Thornbury informs me. If it is disagreeable or inconvenient to their officers, I would not wish their men to come, tho’ I do...
Mr. Patterson and Mr. Southall communicated to me your orders for removing the stores to Henderson’s on the North river, and thence upwards. The superior expediency of removing them to the main river appeared to the council so evident that they had fixed on that river as the proper line of deposit: I have consulted with many gentlemen of judgment now at Charlottesville, and the same measure...
The Iron Chest that was put in your Waggon contains a number of Papers of consequence, you will be pleas’d to take it with you to this place. We have reason to apprehend that the Enemy are within twelve miles of Charlottesville. I apprehended two days ago a Desserter on suspicion of his being a spie. Circumstances are strong against him but no positive proof. He says that the Enemy will be...
In consequence of the vacancy at the board of three, occasioned by the resignation of Mr Baldwin, I have been advised to offer myself as his successor. Having come hither on public business in behalf of Virginia, and without any views towards obtaining an appointment, I have no other recommendation or testimonial in my favor, than my past conduct and present situation can give me. Perhaps it...
I find the number of waggons in the QMG’s department so utterly inadequate to the wants of the State, that the most common purposes of that department cannot be executed, nor any assistance afforded to the others. At present, indeed, Mr. Brown the commissary general has the greater part of them employed by him. Nothing can be done, therefore, in the collection of military stores without an...
I have received Your Letter of the 20th of last month —and Mr Harrison has communicated to me the contents of one he had received from You of the same date. The arrangement of Officers for the Regiments gone to the Southward, was made at philadelphia—after the Virginia line marched from hence—and I do not know the reasons which operated, for appointing Colo. Gist to the command of one of them...