Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Davies, William"
Results 1-50 of 93 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Richmond, 3 Jan. 1781. Has been directed by the governor to order the tailor and shoemaker at Warwick to go to Chesterfield Courthouse immediately; but fears that without an officer to attend them they will desert; suggests that they be sent for, with a wagon or two to remove the leather and cloth on hand. RC ( Vi ); 2 p.; addressed: “Colo. William Davies Chesterfield Court House”; endorsed;...
The Commissioner of the provision law, I think he is called, being so exceedingly ill as to be past the possibility of recovery, I have taken this opportunity of giving your Excellency notice of it, as the arrival of the new levies will occasion a considerable consuption of provision; and we have no great quantity of meat on hand. Mr. Ball is the gentleman who is expected to expire in a few...
I had the honor of addressing your Excellency in two letters last week upon the subject of some supplies in the cloathing department. I have not yet been favored with your answer, altho’ Captain Peyton informs me you have been kind enough to give the necessary orders for the money, and that one sett of shoemakers’ tools are procured. I would wish to be informed of your Excellency’s intentions...
I gave immediate orders to Captain Brown of the artillery, and he will instantly set out for Hood’s. By some mismanagement the orders for Captain Brown’s continuance at Richmond are now somewhere in that town, and he knew nothing of them till he came here. I am under obligations to your Excellency for your ready attention to my information on the complaint of Mattinly. The papers you have...
From the negligence of Col. Munford the issuing continental commissary general in this State, there is the most shameful waste of provision and scandalous abuses in that department that can well be conceived. He has not for many months paid the least attention to his deputies, and has even refused to appoint the necessary issuers to the troops below. The provisions delivered by Mr. Brown [John...
[ Richmond, 9 Apr. 1781 . War Office Journal (Vi) contains the following minute under this date: “Letter to his Excellency the Governor proposing Mr. Gilbert to superintend the public carpenters.” Not found. A virtually identical entry appears some pages later in the War Office Journal, under the same date but among the May entries; it may be a mere repetition by a careless clerk or it may...
I beg leave to represent to your Excellency the absolute necessity of appointing one of the officers of the new state regiment to do the duty of Town major at this place. It is impossible for the duties of this office to be done without confusion, if the Commissioner’s attention is perpetually distracted with orders for provision for this man, and rum for another, and a pair of shoes for a...
As it would be proper for us, I suppose, to make use of the same kind of parole that the British require of us, which is very restricted in its terms, I will be obliged to your Excellency to favor me with a copy or the original parole signed by Govr. Hamilton. I am your Excellency’s most obdt servt., RC ( Vi ); addressed; endorsed in part: “April 14th 1781” (date of receipt?).
As considerable numbers of militia are daily arriving at this place, very many of whom are not armed, and as I know of no public stores from whence they can be supplied, I beg to know your Excellency’s sentiments with respect to the propriety of discharging such as cannot be equipped, or whether it would be your wish that they should be detained here, till a sufficient number of arms can be...
I had this day the honor to receive your Excellency’s favor of the 16th and enclose for your information the whole stock of cloathing on hand at this place, much the greater part of which came in this morning. I have been using every endeavor for some time past to bring to a point all the cloathing required by law from the various counties, but the confusions which the incursions of the enemy...
In consequence of an Order of the House of Representatives, that the Commissioners of the General Board should report the amount of the Claims of the several States, mr Gilman and mr Kean, Genl Irvine being absent, thought proper to report no. 1, which mr Madison calls a libel on the State. North Carolina and Georgia are also Stigmatized, but their Vengeance seems more particularly directed at...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am truly sorry that an unhappy occasion compels me to intrude at this time upon your more important concerns, and beg the circumstance may have sufficient weight to apologize therefor. My son William Davies, was lately taken in the ship General Washington, from this Port on a Cruize, by the British ship of War, Chatham and he with other Officers of the...
Inclosed I transmit copies of the resolution of Congress and the opinion of the board of war of this state with your Excellency’s order respecting Captain Peyton the sub or state clothier. I think there has not yet been much reason to apprehend so great an over proportion of cloathing would be in his hands, as to induce the Continental Cloathier General to direct a distribution of it to other...
I have taken my quarters in the Senate house, and find in one of the rooms below, a great variety of public papers scattered about and open to every body. This I am told is the case with the papers of the General court at the lower end of the town. As I am not acquainted who are the proper officers, and as I suppose these papers must be of some value, I have taken the liberty to inform your...
Chesterfield, 23 Feb. 1781. Because of his “present constant hurry,” Davies has been unable to find “the plan for the cloathier’s department”; will forward it as soon as he can find it. The deerskins can be dressed at Chesterfield if the men who understand doing it are permitted to stay. RC ( Vi ); 2 p.; addressed and endorsed.
I have the honor of your Excellency’s favors of this date and of the 19th. I have never yet been able to find out where your letter of the 13th. is, the detention of which you observe the superscription will explain. It has never yet come to hand; and if this express should reach your Excellency before the bearer of one I wrote you today sets out on his return, I shall be obliged to you to...
4 February 1804, Norfolk. “The enclosed papers, exhibit an irregularity of Conduct on the part of two American Captains, which it may be proper to lay before you, I have only to add that the Sailor, Burnes, by the records in this Office appears to be a native American Seaman.” RC ( DNA : RG 59, ML ). 1 p. Enclosures not found.
[ War Office, Richmond, 4 Apr. 1781 . A minute in the War Office Journal (Vi) under this date reads as follows: “Letter to the Governor, inclosing one from Colonel Muter, respecting supernumeries of the State Garrison Regiment; also one from Mr. William Mann, Asst. Commissary of Military Stores, about Cannon, &c. at Newcastle; and submitting to his decision the arrangement of the state Corps,...
Chesterfield, 11 Mch. 1781 . Forwards a number of letters taken from a packet addressed to Steuben; Steuben’s letters have been forwarded by express. Some time ago replied to TJ’s inquiry concerning dressing deer skins that this could be done but has heard nothing further concerning them. A greater quantity of leather and two sets of shoemaker’s tools are needed. The clothier contracted for...
The militia from the counties your Excellency mentions have all arrived. Those from Amherst, who came in the last, marched today. All the military stores, I have directed to be issued since my arrival at this place, have been issued by Captain Spiller and Captain Irish. A number were previously delivered by a Waggon master Patten at Manikin town and Judes ferry. He lives at Petersburg. I shall...
The compensation, which I am to receive from the Commonwealth of Virginia for my service as Commissioner for settling her account with the United States, is by contract dependent to a certain degree upon the result of that business; the Executive having engaged to add to my stipulated wages in case of a favorable termination of it. I have flattered myself that, considering the large proportion...
Of the hundred pair of shoes expected from Petersburg, there came only 53, and those so bad that a day’s wear will destroy them. If my wish could be had, they should be returned. For my part I will never direct the distribution of any of them to the men, unless it be to taylors and shoemakers, whose sedentary occupations will not admit of much walking. There are a number of men belonging to...
War Office [ Richmond ], 23 Apr. 1781. Encloses an extract of a letter from Gen. Greene “which came to hand this Morning.” RC ( Vi ); 3 p.; addressed and endorsed. The enclosed extract of a letter from Greene to Davies was undoubtedly taken from that of 11 Apr. 1781, dated at Little River ( Tr in CSmH ). The extract was transmitted by TJ to Huntington on this date, but it has not been further...
Letter not found. 29 October 1803 . Acknowledged in Daniel Brent to Davies, 7 Nov. 1803 (DNA: RG 59, DL, vol. 14). Encloses the protest of Joseph Seward, William Randell Mitchell, and James Chew, officers and crew of the brig Drake , complaining of the impressment of two members of the crew, James Ferniol and Neil Long. Also enclosed was a certificate from the U.S. consul at Liverpool stating...
As the Virginia commissioner charged with settling the state’s accounts with the Union, William Davies had been in New York since early 1789 arranging and presenting vouchers and other evidence of the Virginia expenditures during the war. In conducting this business the commissioner worked closely with the Virginia delegation in Congress, particularly with JM, who was “zealous on this subject”...
I am directed by the board of arrangement to lay the inclosed representation before your Excellency. They are not actuated by any other motives than a regard to their own rights as officers, and the general interest of the service. Upon similar pretensions General Scott might have retired when General Weedon was irregularly placed over his head; and General Muhlenberg, who was in the same...
War Office [ Richmond ], 9 Apr. 1781 . The wooden work for wagons goes forward well at Dinwiddie Courthouse, but there is no blacksmith there to do the smith’s work. Mr. Hardaway, who lives three miles from that place, “will undertake that business at 4/ a day, payable at 20/ a hundred for tobacco according to the evaluation of the previous grand jury. He will engage for six months for himself...
Richmond, 16 Jan. 1781. There are about 100 Chesterfield militia now at Manchester, consisting of old men and boys. No purpose can be served by continuing them. Since some militia are to be dismissed, “at least such whose turn has been already taken, previous to the present invasion,” and Col. Haskins says he has “sent all the able men to the army without regard to classes,” orders are...
I thank your Excellency for your information of yesterday . It is improbable Cunningham would be willing to work, and the shortest method in such times of emergency, is to impress the shop and tools for a while. I am surprized your Excellency could conceive I should know where the military stores of this state were dispersed having had no kind of connexion with them, either in point of...
I beg leave to introduce to your notice Mr. James Murray, a grandson of the late President Yates of William and Mary. He has written in my office for some time past, and has given me satisfaction. My public business here being near a termination, he appears desirous to obtain a commission in the army, and more particularly in the line of the artillery. As I know him to be possessed of many...
I am often applied to by seamen belonging to Coasting vessels for protections, alledging that the British Ships of War impress them within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States. I have never been able to ascertain that such practice actually exists; but the transaction stated in the enclosed deposition seems to be so irregular, that I think it proper to be communicated. I have...
Col. Th. M. Randolph has a large flat or lighter, which he tells me can go sixteen miles above his house . It would carry off a great deal of stores if we had it, and I am very apprehensive without it we shall lose a great deal. I am but little acquainted with him, otherwise should make the request myself. I would therefore submit it to your Excellency whether you would think it proper to...
I found upon my return hither that all the troops, that marched from hence upon the arrival of the enemy, had by order of Baron Steuben come back to this station, from their utter inability to keep the field, from the want of almost every species of cloathing. Many men have not a remnant of cloathing larger than a good napkin to cover their nakedness, and a number of these are dependent upon...
Your several favors came to hand yesterday, but neither the tools nor the taylors are yet arrived. I never knew whose property the tools were, whether public or private, and the taylors, belonging to the State Garrison regiment, are countermanded by Major McGill, as Mr. Thornbury informs me. If it is disagreeable or inconvenient to their officers, I would not wish their men to come, tho’ I do...
In answer to your Excellency’s favor of yesterday , I would observe that it is necessary the good arms and prepared ammunition should continue here to be issued to the militia, as they arrive. If there should be danger, which I do not conceive there is at present, the arms &c. may be removed in boats, of which I have a number collected. There is a considerable quantity of loose ammunition...
In consequence of the vacancy at the board of three, occasioned by the resignation of Mr Baldwin, I have been advised to offer myself as his successor. Having come hither on public business in behalf of Virginia, and without any views towards obtaining an appointment, I have no other recommendation or testimonial in my favor, than my past conduct and present situation can give me. Perhaps it...
I need not represent to your Excellency the insecurity of this place. We never can proceed with any degree of certainty in any of our public works while the enemy command the rivers. The state of our arms requires security to the workmen from alarms, and I am confident we shall never be able to get them repaired, unless some buildings are prepared for them in a safe place above the falls. I...
I am informed a considerable number of public papers, brimstone and other articles are lying round the works at Westham, many of them very little damaged. I cannot well spare any body from this side to collect them, but think it my duty to give your Excellency the information. The number of Hanover militia on the other side the river, is so considerable as to take the whole of the good arms. I...
The equipment of the cavalry is a matter of real consequence to our military operations. The enclosed account appears to have arisen from an application to Mr. Simpson by the officers of the cavalry for a number of articles the troops were in want of. He has applied to Col. Finnie for payment, who tells him he can only give him a certificate for what is due him. Mr. Simpson is very willing to...
War Office [ Richmond ], 10 Apr. 1781 . Many men already discharged from the army have arrears in pay due them. “It is hard upon these men to lose their pay, and it is exceedingly troublesome to this office, to the Auditors and to your Excellency, for the adjustment of each man’s claim to be thrown individually upon us. I would therefore submit it to your Excellency, whether it will not be...
The badness of the weather has prevented my return to Richmond today. I am, however, so firmly persuaded of the enemy’s intentions up the rivers, that I cannot refrain from renewing my request for the impressment of a number of waggons not only for the removal of the stores at Petersburg and Chesterfield, which amount to at least 150 waggon loads, but also for the removal of the cannon at...
The unsecure situation of the publick Stores in your County makes it necessary that Steps should be immediately taken to put them out of the power of the enemy. The grain perhaps, it would be better to sell, the cattle possibly might be driven to Wilmington or Philadelphia but an escort ought to be sent with them till they shall have passed Worcester and Sussex Counties. The preservation of...
The inclosed certificate is produced with a view of obtaining the same quantity of powder that was lent. It is now wanting for a privateer just going to sea. I beg your Excellency’s directions whether the money or the powder shall be paid. I have the honor to be, sir, Your Excellency’s most obedt servt., In Council Apr. 11. 1781. Mr. Elliott having received this powder, not under the orders of...
I was desired by the Baron before his leaving town to lay before your Excellency, an extract of a letter from General Greene, which unintentionally he omitted to present to you yesterday, altho’ I think he said he had conversed with you on this subject. His great anxiety for an immediate supply of ammunition to be forwarded on to General Greene has induced him to press this matter with so much...
Captain Young, the Quartermaster general of the state, who has just arrived, informs me that he saw at Edentown about 30 exceeding fine cannon of 18s and 24s. He asked the Naval officer, whose they were, who informed him they were the property of the State of Virginia, thrown out of a French vessel, who carried the remainder of them to South quay. As I have no return of any thing of the kind,...
[ Richmond, 26 Mch. 1781 . Minute in War Office Journal (Vi) under this date: “A letter from the Governor respecting the discharge of soldiers for six months, who have no Certificate, nor Witnesses to prove the expiration of their terms of service; and requesting some general plan to be proposed for the regulation of such cases. Answer returned. That in such cases, their oath should be...
I find the number of waggons in the QMG’s department so utterly inadequate to the wants of the State, that the most common purposes of that department cannot be executed, nor any assistance afforded to the others. At present, indeed, Mr. Brown the commissary general has the greater part of them employed by him. Nothing can be done, therefore, in the collection of military stores without an...
[ Richmond, 27 Mch. 1781 . Minute in War Office Journal (Vi) under this date: “Letter to the Governor, suggesting that although Mr. Anderson claims liberty to contract with persons to wash and cook for his people, there is no such privilege allowed him in his contract, only for nine lads, nailors, and being aware of the danger of setting a bad precedent, requests his advice, whether he shall,...
From Mr. Browne’s account it is impossible, I should think, that Col. Innes should be in want of provision. If he has crossed at Ruffin’s, as Mr. Browne says he has, it would be proper to send to New Castle what stores you may under the present circumstances think necessary to order to him. At present we are in great distress for want of waggons. Every one of the public offices almost, as the...
The General expressed to me yesterday in such strong terms the great importance of the post at Chesterfield, and urged so strenuously his idea of the necessity of my continuing my superintendance at that place till the march of the new raised troops shall be over, that it was in vain I represented my opinion of the impracticability of discharging my duty towards it, or the fatigue and trouble...