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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Cranch, Mary Smith"
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I have been waiting till I am out of all patience to hear that you are returnd to England. One or two vessels have sail’d for London without taking Letters for you. I did not know they were going till it was too late to write. I sent you a hasty line by Mr. Charles Bulfinch which I hope you receiv’d and to tell you the truth I have written you two letters Since, which I thought proper to...
I have just Sent away one Letter and shall now begin another to be ready for the next ship. Cousin John is not yet arriv’d. I hear of him upon the road. He has not quite done his duty. He should have written to one of his uncles at least as soon as he came on Shore, but I will not chide him without hearing his reasons, I feel inclin’d to be very partial to him. I have just heard that cousin...
When I wrote you by Captain Dashood, I was obliged for want of time to break of before I had noticed certain parts of your Letter, some of which gave me anxiety, particularly that which related to a certain Gentleman, of whose present affairs, or future intentions we know nothing of. I had written to you upon this Subject but not having time to transcribe more than half my Letter, that part...
I have enjoyed very good Health ever since I came to London, untill ten days past. I had about a week since a small attack of the Fall disorder which I hoped I had got the better of. The next seizure was such a swiming in my Head when I laid down in the Bed, as to throw me almost into convulsions. It finally produced a violent puking which relieved me of that, tho I cannot say I feel well. You...
Your kind Letters of July and August are before me. I thank you most sincerely for the particular manner in which you write; I go along with you, and take an interest in every transaction which concerns those I love. And I enjoy more pleasure from those imaginary Scenes, than I do from the drawing room at St. James’s. In one I feel my self your Friend and equal, in the other I know I am looked...
I told you in my last, that I was going to dine with my Friend Mrs. Rogers. You must know that yesterday the whole Diplomatick Choir dinned here, that is his Lordship the Marquiss of Carmarthan and all the Foreign Ministers 15 in all, and to day the Newspapers proclaim it. I believe they have as many Spies here as the Police of France. Upon these occasions no Ladies are admitted, so I wrote a...
Mr. Thaxter will want a horse in a short time, to go a journey, and I should be glad, if mine is not wanted, that Charles should come with him; as he desires to. He will then be of some service and of no expense; if Uncle Tufts thinks proper, Charles can ride the horse here, when he comes. But if he does not think it for the best, will you favour me with a Line that I may inform Mr. Thaxter....
I hope my dear Sister you have receiv’d the Letter You was looking for in Callahan. I think I did not send it till the next Ship Saild. I have put a very long letter aboard this Ship a month since, supposing she would sail in a few days. Last night I receiv’d your Letter of the i6th of august and am not a little surpriz’d at the contents. My dear Niece has acted with a Spirit worthy of her...
Although I have written so largly to you by the last vessels that Saild I cannot bear to let another go without a few Lines. I have not yet receiv’d your Letters by Charles Storer. He is not come to Boston. I am anxious to receive them. I want to know what it is, whether any thing in particular has happen’d to make my Neice take such a determin’d part with regard to a certain Gentleman. He is...
How provoking it is to be told that a vessel is to sail next week with our Letters and then have it stay in the Harbour six Weeks. I thought till yesterday that Capn. Young was half way to London at least, and behold he will not leave Boston this week. The Letters will be so old, that they will lose much of their value, but tis no fault of mine. I have been waiting some time without writing...