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    • Adams Presidency
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    • Cranch, Mary Smith
    • Adams, Abigail

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Documents filtered by: Period="Adams Presidency" AND Correspondent="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail"
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I never visit or pass your house but I think of that beautiful & simple Song in the Spectator The Rose Bush under your window is as full of bloom & fragrance I suppose as formerly. your Garden florishes & your Clover Field is delightful—but Should I tell you how the view of them affected me before I recieved your last Letter you might call me romantick— I pass’d them yesterday—went into your...
I got through the 4 July with much more ease than I expected. it was a fine cool day, and my fatigue arose chiefly from being drest at an early hour, and receiving the very numerous Sets of company who were so polite as to pay their compliments to me in succession in my drawing Room after visiting the President below, and partaking of cake wine & punch with him. to my company were added the...
I write my dear Sister with a hope that this letter will not find you in Philadelphia but as we have not heard that congress have risen I would not have you without a line of information that we are all well & that your chambers are ready the mason has promis’d to white wash the house & mrs Porter is waiting for orders to clean for your reception I have been fearful for your health & that of...
If the Compass by which my course is directed does not vary again through unavoidable necessity I shall sit out for Quincy next week. we shall probably be 12 days in comeing. I shall want some preparation at Home. I will write to you from N york. Betsy wrote to her Mother to know if her sister Nancy was at home & that I should want her during my stay at Quincy The Hot weather of july has...
The weather is Hot as we can bear the whole city is like a Bake House. we have a House with large and airy Rooms, or I could not sustain it I do bear it surprizingly well however, tho I long for a sea Breaze. I hope to leave here on monday and get on to Bristol 18 miles the first night. I shall want Several things put in order at home for our reception when I once get on my journey. I shall...
we have made every thing as ready for your reception as we can. but alass I fear we Shall not see you. I think it will not be possible under the present State of affairs for the President to leave with prudence the Seat of Goverment for So long a journey but I hope you will leave the city If you do not come you will be Sav’d the melancholy prospect of your ruin’d Barley field & distroy’d...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
we arrived here on twesday Evening on the 11 th , after a pleasent journey in which we met with but few obstructions the Weather on one Day prevented our travelling, and we tarried on sunday at Hartford, and on Monday morning were escorted out of Town by a Troop of light Horse, and the citizens in carriages and on Horse back as far as Weathersfield. we proceed then for New Haven about 40 miles...
I thank you for your Letter from worcester since that I have heard by the papers you have arriv’d in new-york. I hope Safe. you must have had bad weather some part of the way if Such as we had reach’d you. last Sunday evening we had a terrible Tempest of thunder Lightning & wind & rain the Lightning struck the house of cap n. J o. Baxter & every person in it reciev’d a Shock there were many...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...