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No Eliza I do not believe your real affection has decreased for Amelia, but a consiousness of my even doing wrong sometimes leads me to feel neglected, when, perhaps , I am not. But do not say that you love me better every time you converse with me. I must believe you sincere and this belief will lead me for the first time to dought your judgement. I do not say this to be contradicted. It is...
Your letter my Dear Eliza, was, sent me yesterday afternoon. By the bearer of it I returned an insipid scrale —which I suppose you have either recieved or will recieve—to day. Nothing is uninteresting to friends, a meere trivial detail of events, from those we regard, are pleasing. Never my Eliza refrain from writing me, with an idea, that you have nothing interesting to say, but let me hear...
I bought me a blue sarcenet coat not long since; after making it up I found it was hardly wide enough to wear over a straw coat, but I thought it was no matter; I could send it to one of my nieces. When I went to put it up, I thought, I wished I had another. “It is easily got, said I. Ned, bring the carriage to the door and drive me to Thornton’s, the petticoat shop.” “Here, Madam, is a very...
I take my pen to perform my promice of writing to you and to wish you a happy new year may heaven pour down those blessings upon you that will make this life agreable this is an unsertain World we know not what a day may bringh forth & when we think we are in the utmost dainger we may be in the least Mrs. Waren has lately had a severe trial of her fortitude A Son as it ware raisd from the arms...
How shall I excuse myself for my long neglecting to write to you? Should I offer any other apology, than want of proper abilities, it would be false; and should I offer that , which is the only true one, perhaps it might be thought I wished for a compliment. But I had rather my Cousin should have a less favourable opinion of my understanding; than have cause to doubt my regard for him. That...
Mr. Robbins dined with us to day and has just now told me he intends to make you a vis this afternoon. I hope he will find you quite recovered, and wish you were to return with him. I shall want the pleasure of your company a Wedensy very much—and wish I could offer a sufficient inducement for you to return, tomorrow or next day. I know of nothing to write that will either amuse or give you...
by your desire I now sit down to write a few lines to you and not yet having wrote to you I cannot let this oportunity pass without writing. my Pappa has received two or three packets from my mamma in which she said our family and Freinds were all well as I hope this will find them. I have nothing material to write having given an account of my voyage and travels to my Mamma. I am your...
It is now past ten however I will write you a few lines as I flatter myself they will be axcepttable, for you know we ar too apt to judge others by our own feelings. I will ask you one question whetheir if you have an opportunity to write me you dont imbrace it if you dont happen to be in dept debt ? If we ware too or three hundred miles distant I could expect to hear as often from you as I do...
I have began too or three letters to you but have burnt them, all for reasons that you need not be inquisitive to know. If they had been fit for your perusal you should have seen them: I have just returned from Germantown, my favourite Miss Mayhew is there, in as good spirits as usual. Our friend Amanda talks of leaveing Ger manto wn her mamma has sent for her, I had not time to ask her why....
In your Letter to Mamma my Dear Eliza of —— May you are strangely puzled to know in what manner to address your Cousin. Your suppositions at that time were rather premature, and the Card on which they were founded was from a family by the Name of Smith who have been vastly civil to us since our residence in this Country. But at this period, a Letter addressd to your friend under the title of M...
Excuse me I have time only to tell you that I designd to have written, but the captain sails sooner than I expected. I send you some magizines to amuse you, and will continue them to you. Give my Duty to my Honourd Mother and Love to my cousins, to the Germantown family remember me. I have a letter too for milton Hill partly finishd. See what procrastination does, but I wanted to have my...
i thank you for your last letter i have have had it in my mind to write to you this long time but afairs of much leess importance has prevented me i have made But veray little proviciancy in reading to much of my time in play th ere is a great Deal of room for me to grow better brother charls has got a very bad cold martha feild and Naby curtis sends their love to you and sister Naby from your...
I came yesterday as far as Boston with Sister Lucy, who is employ’d in fixing me off: I came here in the afternoon finally to settle. Your Brother goe to Boston this morning, and I have but a few minutes to write. All at Braintree are well, Mr. Tyler’s Windmill is to be raised this day. There’s another thing, that you would never let me know. I have got a number of articles of impeachment,...
My things, are yet pretty much in Confusion, and I do not expect to get well settled till the next Quarter. I find much more, to do here than I expected; it is true that every persons who chooses, may be idle 3 days in the 6; but every one may also, find full sufficient employment if he chooses. Mr: Williams’s Philosophical Lectures, began, Tuesday the 28th: of last month; we have already, had...
As a convenient opportunity offoring by General Warren I cannot let it excape without a line for my Myrtilla. I now take up my pen to inform you that I do not feel in the writing humour and am determind to indulge myself and give way to thease Lazy freeks. I shall take my pen in the eve again and will give you an account how I shall have spent the afternoon for I am now already trigd to...
Last weak I had the pleasure to receive too letters from my friend Myrtilla, aney time when you have letters if you send them to Brackets and dirrect them to General Waren or his Laidie, they will come safe to hand; you must cover them if you intend I shall read them first: I should have wrote you a longer letter by this opportunity but am prevented by an accident, which has taken up my...
If aney person had told me the night I left Braintree that I should have ben at Plymouth almost seven weaks and have received only one letter from my Mamma and too from my Myrtilla I should have thought they ware capable of telling a falshood but I find it too true. I had almost taken up a resollution not to have wrote to aney of my Braintree friends untill I had received letters from them,...
I have now before me your two last Letters by my Dear Eliza received by Capt Calliham which I mean to answer before my Brother departs, and this will be in a very few days. You cannot wonder that is an event that I am not at all gratified with. I think of it as little as possible for tis hard to the that he is to be with us by anticipating the lonesomeness of our situation when he Shall be...
I thank you my dear Neice for your last kind Letter. There are no days in the whole year so agreable to me nor any amusements this Country can boast so gratifying to my Heart and mind as those days which bring me Letters from my Dear Friends. In them I always find the law of kindness written, and they solace my mind in the seperation. Could I, you ask, return to my (Rustick) cottage, and view...
I have not heard a word from B— since Wedensday last. I want much to know how you all do. I wrote you last Saturday. Mrs. Quincy took my letter yesterday. Hope you have received it. You will not complain of my not writing you I bleive, my letters can give you little pleasure only as they are dictated by a heart that rearly loves you. My affection for you is an inducement for my writing you at...
I have not wrote you my dear Aunt for a long time, much too long I confess; and even now those motives which have prevented, continue in force: A barreness of Subject is of all preventives the most dissagreable and I find it is like to prevail and increase in me daily; motives however more powerful have overcome this; and I am induced to write—tho—I triffle. Love, gratitude and esteem, I feel;...
Yes my dear Neice, it was a Ceremony that one must study Some time to find out either utility or pleasure in it. I own tho I made one in the procession I could not help feeling foolish as I was parading first up one side of a very wide road, for a mile and half and then turning, and following down a vast number of Carriages upon the other as slow as if you was attending a funeral. By this...
My Dear Eliza will be one of the first to inquire after the welfare of her friend. Nor shall she be the last unanswered. Thus far we have proceeded on our voyage with as good weather and in as good health as we could expect. We find many things disagreeable and many inconveniencies, which might have been remedied had we have known them. Others that are the necessary attendants of a sea Life...
I am determined not to neglect my pen for so long an interval as I did before your last Letters; for then I always go to it with reluctance. Mr. Appleton came here this Day week; from London, and as he thinks he shall return before Captain Young sails, I am induced to proceed to the fulfilment of my promise, and attempt a Description of the French Theater. I have from time, to time, survey’d...
Yesterday my Dear Eliza I returned from G ermantown and this morning, it being our usual post day, I received your letter and take the earlyest opportunity to acknowledge and answer it. Your late excursion to Boston has given you spirits. I was not conscious that my letter breathed more of friendship, or of Love, than usual, the most reasonable construction I can put upon, this curious rant of...
Your wishes for my happiness, my Dear Eliza, demand my thanks. Wishing, this power of the mind, if it originates from the heart, are as emblems of it, they shew us either the benevolence or depravity of it, and as such claim our return. Your solicitation to know the cause why I am not rearly happy demands that confidence I have ever felt in my friend, tho I have sometimes been led to think it...
This day I was Dining with Mamma at Mrs. Atkinsons in hourly expectation of receiving letters from America, Mr. Elworthy called and sent me up, one from my Dear Eliza. It was a pleasure that I have not known till now. You cannot form an idea of the sensations that operates in the mind of one, at receiving letters from those we esteem when situated from almost every friend. Sure I am you cannot...
to what Cause my Dear Eliza am I to attribute that Air of Mistery which reigns throughout your last Letter to me,— you ever Possessed my friendship Esteem and affection, nor do I know that you have ever intentionally forfeited either, why then my Dear Girl do you imagine them estranged from you,— there is one Epoch of our Lives which I Consider as the Ordeal of friendship, if we are so...
Enclosed is a tasty ribbon for you, I do not mean to forget my other dear cousin, but could not light of one that all together pleased me at the time: Your cousin Jack, arrived here yesterday from the Hague to my no small joy I assure you. There is in his manners behaviour and countanance, Strong resemblance of his Pappa. He is the same good humourd Lad he formerly was. I look upon him Scarcly...
Every moment of my time has been employd since we got home, in writing to my friends abroad, to forward by Mr. Smith who sails a thursday—that I have not had any opportunity to give you my dear Eliza an account of our return home. Twas disagreeable enough I assure you—the day was very warm. However we got to Wymans to dine. There we stay’d till five in the afternoon. Went to Mr. Brooks and...
Your letter my Dear Eliza was this day handed me by your Mamma. I Love her much, Eliza, but wish you would just give her a hint , and tell her from me that I hope she say to no one Else, what she, does to me. I should be very sorry if I thought she did. And now to your letter. If my last convinced you, that no doubts existed in my mind, of your friendship, it had its intended effect. I am...
Your last letter my Dear Eliza, deserved from the goodness and friendship, expressed, a reply long ere this. I cannot with truth offer to you aney apology, but must submit the inattention to your candour. I have now taken my pen, and do not realy know what to write, unless you will permit me to give you an account of my yesterdays excursion. As I ever feel interested in every scene however...
At the Bath hotel I received my dear Neices Letter of April. I have told your Sister and other Friends why I did not write then, but I should have no excuse to give if I omitted so good an opportunity as now offers by Mr. Storer. This day two months ago we removed here, where I should be much delighted if I could have my Sisters my Cousins and connections round me, but for want of them every...
Here my Dear Eliza is your friend placed in a little village two or three miles from Paris, unknowing and unknown to every person around her except our own family. Without a friend a companion, or an acquaintance of my own sex. In this may I expect to spend the next Winter, retired, within myself, and my chamber, studiously indeavouring, to gain a knowledge of the French Language which I...
How shall I express to you the grateful Sense I feel, for your kind remembrance and attention in favouring me with such charming Letters? I find indeed that I cannot do it as I wish; if you know my heart, tis unnecesary to say more. I have written so much to Cousin Nabby, that I find it difficult to find a Subject for another Letter. —I have informed her of all my past adventures; but have not...
I have this moment heard that Cushing will sail for London in 3 days, It mortifies me to let one oppertunty pass unimprovd that might convey to my Aunt the assurances of my grateful affection, and earnest wishes for her happiness; Time nor absence have abated that (may I not call it) filial regard which your tender kindness, early inspired my heart; the recollection of inumerable instances of...
A Letter from my dear Aunt Adams recievd last July remains unanswered; I am almost ashamed to reccollect it; but for a long time indisposition tottally prevented my using my pen at all: it was under absolute prohibition— within these few weeks my health seems mending—& possibly I may injoy a comfortable degree of it this winter: the pleasing hope of your return in the Spring, which I now...
I am situated at a small desk in an appartment about 2 thirds as large as your own little Chamber; this appartment opens into my lodging Chamber which is handsome and commodious, and is upon a range with 6 or 7 others all of which look into the Garden. My Chamber is hung with a rich India patch, the bed, Chairs and window curtains of the same, which is very fashionable in this Country, two...
My Papa came in this evening and brought a great Letter directed to Mama, superscrib’d by my Uncle Adams. Mama is at Braintree, we had no Letters to satisfy us. The Pacquet was laid upon the table. I took it up, examined the seal, and wanted much to get at the contents, then took the stocking, (which I was lining the Heel of for your Charles), and work’d upon it a little, all the time...
And why my Dear Eliza has my letter layn unanswered. That it merited a reply I will not pretend to determine, but as the motive which actuated me to write was a very friendly and Cousinly one, I had the vanity to hope you would favour me with a second letter. If I have been presumtious, be pleased to let me know it, and I will indeavour to step back—tho a very mortifying movement. If I...
Why my Dear Eliza have I not had the pleasure of hearing from you but once in an absence of two months. Is this right Betsy? I have been half of a mind to believe that you had ceaced to wish to hear from me—the idea has given me pain. Surely you received a letter by Mr. Shaw at commencement, and I have wrote you since. I cannot say that you have certainly received that but methinks you might...
Your letter N 2. Eliza, I was so happy as to receive a day or two ago. I searched my journal, upon your request to know were I was the 4 of August and found that I was in London, and that day dined at Mr. Vaughans, a very agreeable family, and from whom we received much attention. I was perhaps at the time you wrote at dinner for I recollet we did not dine till five oclock, the usual hour in...
We have sat off our English Friends for Boston. Mama has accompanied them; Sister Lucy has gone to your deserted habitation, and taken our Boy with her to clean the closets, rub the furniture &c. The dampness for want of Fires being kept in the Rooms moulds the things very much, and makes the Paper peal off, and it requires considerable care, to keep them in tolerably good order. And here is...
The last evening we were all made happy by the reciept of Letters from you and Cousin Nabby, How happy, you may more easily concieve than I describe; 8 days since we heard of the arrival of Captn. Lyde, but not particulary from you. Mama recieved a few Lines from you dated London the second of August. She has been at Haverhill these 10 days last past, and we sent the Letter to her. She is now...
You can judge of my impatience my Dear Cousin, the last week when we heard from Mr. Storer who informed us that he had forwarded some days before a large packet of letters from America to my Pappa, by a diligence established for transporting letters and packets from London to Paris, and he supposed it must have arrived some days before we should receive his letter. The next Morning my Brother...
Did you ever my dear Betsy see a person in real Life such as your imagination form’d of Sir Charles Grandison? The Baron de Stael the Sweedish Ambassador comes nearest to that Character in his Manners and personal appearence of any Gentleman I ever saw. The first time I saw him I was prejudic’d in his favour, for his countanance Commands your good opinion, it is animated intelligent sensible...
Yesterday, my Dear Eliza, I came here to pass a few days with our friend. I found her much indisposed. She is better to day, and has flattered me by saying, my company has been of service, to her. I wish I could feel conscious that this is not the result of her complasance. You are now seated in Boston—agreeably—I hope. You aught to be happy, for to deprive your friends of so great a degree of...
Some days agone I received a letter from you dated May last. The true reason why I have not written to you since I have been in Europe, is, that as you expect that my letters would be very entertaining, by the variety of the subjects, that I have had to write upon, I do not wish to disappoint you by writing letters that would give you no pleasure. But as you have begun, I can no longer excuse...
While I was at St. Petersbourg, I had, the Pleasure, of receiving a Letter from you; I answered it, but since that time I have shamefully neglected writing to you. I own my fault, and promise to repair it for the future; and I hope, that you will pardon me, upon that Condition. The only reason I had for it, was a bad one. I feared that if I wrote, you would perceive that the improvements I had...
I think my dear Betsy that some Letter of yours must have faild, as I have none of a later date, than that which you sent me from Haverhill by mr Wilson, by which I find that you are studying Musick with Miss White. This is an accomplishment much in vogue in this Country, and I know of no other civilized Country which stands in so much need of harmonizing as this. That ancient Hospitality for...