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    • Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA …
    • Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA …
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    • Cranch, Elizabeth
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    • Cranch, Elizabeth

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA and AA)" AND Author="Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA and AA)" AND Recipient="Cranch, Elizabeth" AND Correspondent="Cranch, Elizabeth"
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I have now before me your two last Letters by my Dear Eliza received by Capt Calliham which I mean to answer before my Brother departs, and this will be in a very few days. You cannot wonder that is an event that I am not at all gratified with. I think of it as little as possible for tis hard to the that he is to be with us by anticipating the lonesomeness of our situation when he Shall be...
I have not heard a word from B— since Wedensday last. I want much to know how you all do. I wrote you last Saturday. Mrs. Quincy took my letter yesterday. Hope you have received it. You will not complain of my not writing you I bleive, my letters can give you little pleasure only as they are dictated by a heart that rearly loves you. My affection for you is an inducement for my writing you at...
My Dear Eliza will be one of the first to inquire after the welfare of her friend. Nor shall she be the last unanswered. Thus far we have proceeded on our voyage with as good weather and in as good health as we could expect. We find many things disagreeable and many inconveniencies, which might have been remedied had we have known them. Others that are the necessary attendants of a sea Life...
Yesterday my Dear Eliza I returned from G ermantown and this morning, it being our usual post day, I received your letter and take the earlyest opportunity to acknowledge and answer it. Your late excursion to Boston has given you spirits. I was not conscious that my letter breathed more of friendship, or of Love, than usual, the most reasonable construction I can put upon, this curious rant of...
Your wishes for my happiness, my Dear Eliza, demand my thanks. Wishing, this power of the mind, if it originates from the heart, are as emblems of it, they shew us either the benevolence or depravity of it, and as such claim our return. Your solicitation to know the cause why I am not rearly happy demands that confidence I have ever felt in my friend, tho I have sometimes been led to think it...
This day I was Dining with Mamma at Mrs. Atkinsons in hourly expectation of receiving letters from America, Mr. Elworthy called and sent me up, one from my Dear Eliza. It was a pleasure that I have not known till now. You cannot form an idea of the sensations that operates in the mind of one, at receiving letters from those we esteem when situated from almost every friend. Sure I am you cannot...
No Eliza I do not believe your real affection has decreased for Amelia, but a consiousness of my even doing wrong sometimes leads me to feel neglected, when, perhaps , I am not. But do not say that you love me better every time you converse with me. I must believe you sincere and this belief will lead me for the first time to dought your judgement. I do not say this to be contradicted. It is...
Your letter my Dear Eliza, was, sent me yesterday afternoon. By the bearer of it I returned an insipid scrale —which I suppose you have either recieved or will recieve—to day. Nothing is uninteresting to friends, a meere trivial detail of events, from those we regard, are pleasing. Never my Eliza refrain from writing me, with an idea, that you have nothing interesting to say, but let me hear...
Every moment of my time has been employd since we got home, in writing to my friends abroad, to forward by Mr. Smith who sails a thursday—that I have not had any opportunity to give you my dear Eliza an account of our return home. Twas disagreeable enough I assure you—the day was very warm. However we got to Wymans to dine. There we stay’d till five in the afternoon. Went to Mr. Brooks and...
Your letter my Dear Eliza was this day handed me by your Mamma. I Love her much, Eliza, but wish you would just give her a hint , and tell her from me that I hope she say to no one Else, what she, does to me. I should be very sorry if I thought she did. And now to your letter. If my last convinced you, that no doubts existed in my mind, of your friendship, it had its intended effect. I am...