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    • Collinson, Peter
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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Period="Colonial" AND Correspondent="Collinson, Peter" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 11-20 of 42 sorted by editorial placement
ALS : Pierpont Morgan Library Budden is arrived, and every thing you sent per him come safe to hand. Both the Library-Company and the Academy are exceedingly oblig’d to you, and would be glad of any Opportunity of serving you or any of your Friends. The Academy goes on as one could wish: We have excellent Masters, and the Boys improve surprizingly: The Number now 70 and daily encreasing. I...
Copy: The Royal Society In Capt. Waddels Account *Ph. Tr. No. 492. p. III . of the Effects of Lightning on his Ship, I could not but take Notice of the large Comazants (as he Calls them,) that settled on the Spintles at the Topmast-Heads, and burnt like very large Torches before the Stroke. According to my Opinion, the Electrical Fire was then drawing off, as by Points , from the Cloud, the...
Printed in Benjamin Franklin, Supplemental Experiments and Observations on Electricity, Part II . … (London, 1753), pp. 108–[9]. (Yale University Library) As you tell me our friend Cave is about to add some later experiments to my pamphlet, with the Errata , I send a coppy of a letter from Dr. Colden which may help to fill a few pages; also my kite experiment in the Pennsylvania Gazette: to...
Printed in Benjamin Franklin, Experiments and Observations on Electricity (London, 1769), pp. 350–4; also draft (fragment): American Philosophical Society. The earliest surviving reference to Franklin’s magic squares and circles is in a letter from James Logan, January 12, 1750 (see above, III , 458), asking him to bring copies of his work to Stenton. Actually, Franklin had first contrived...
I. MS not found; printed in Benjamin Franklin, Experiments and Observations on Electricity (London, 1769), pp. 354–6. II. MS not found; facsimile: Royal Society; also draft: American Philosophical Society. Of Franklin’s magic square James Ferguson wrote that it went “far beyond any thing of the kind I ever saw before; and the magic circle (which is the first of the kind I ever heard of, or...
Copy: New York Public Library; also copies: Public Record Office, American Philosophical Society, and (part only) British Museum Although this is one of Franklin’s most important letters, there has been difficulty about both its date and its recipient. Moreover, it has never been printed accurately, nor can it be here, for no Franklin autograph has been found. The two fullest surviving...
ALS : Huntington Library I received a Letter from you on the Road hither, with one of the supplemental Papers on Electricity; and a Letter from our Friend Kalm. I condole with you sincerely on the Death of good Mrs. Collinson: I do not, however, offer to comfort you by Arguments drawn from Philosophy or Religion; such will readily occur to a Person of your Understanding and Piety. Natural...
Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society In my former Paper on this Subject, wrote first in 1747, enlarged and sent to England in 1749, I considered the Sea as the grand source of Lightning, imagining its luminous Appearance to be owing to Electric Fire, produced by Friction between the Particles of Water and those of Salt. Living far from the Sea I had then no opportunity of making Experiments...
MS not found; reprinted from Benjamin Franklin, Experiments and Observations on Electricity (London, 1769), p. 165. In my last, via Virginia, I promised to send you per next ship, a small philosophical pacquet: But now having got the materials (old letters and rough drafts) before me, I fear you will find it a great one. Nevertheless, as I am like to have a few days leisure before this ship...
Transcript: Historical Society of Pennsylvania With regard to the Germans, I think Methods of great tenderness should be used, and nothing that looks like a hardship be imposed. Their fondness for their own Language and Manners is natural: It is not a Crime. When People are induced to settle a new Country by a promise of Privileges, that Promise should be bonâ fide performed, and the...