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    • Claiborne, William C. C.
    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Claiborne, William C. C." AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
Results 71-80 of 435 sorted by date (ascending)
Our Letter of the 20th Inst. informed you of the Delivery of Louisiana to the United States, and we now inclose an original Copy of the Process Verbal , or minutes of the transaction, which was signed on the occasion by the Commissioners of France and of the United States. The Barracks Magazines Hospital, and public Store Houses in this City, yet remain in the occupancy of the Spanish...
The tranquillity in which I found this province is uninterrupted: and every appearance promises a continuation of it. This is the season of festivity here; and I am pleased to find that the Change of government gives additional spirit to the public amusements. It gives me great satisfaction to learn from every side the favorable inclinations of the people; and their confidence in the justice...
Since our Letter of the 27. ulto but little Progress has been made in the Business of the Commission. Orders have been issued, by Mr Laussat for the Delivery of the Posts of Concord, Atakapas & Opelousas , to such American Officers as have been selected for those stations, and we are waiting like Orders for the Surrender of the Post of Natchitoches on Red River and those in upper Louisiana....
The Orders from the French Commissioner, for the Delivery of the Posts at Natchitoches and those in upper Louisiana, of which we have been in Expectation for some Days, are not yet received. The Delay has arisen from the Tardiness of the Spanish Commissioners. We are informed however by Mr Laussat, that he has, at Length, received from the Marquis de Casa Calvo, the necessary Instructions to...
I have the honor to enclose you a copy of the ordinance for establishing a court of Justice in this City, which was alluded to in my last communication. I have only to repeat that this measure was essential to the interests of the City, and was called for by the voice of the society, and I persuade myself that the proceedings of this Tribunal will be marked with justice and moderation. I also...
Since my last letter, I have organized in this City four Companies of volunteer militia; they are armed with public muskets, and appear to possess an ardent military spirit, and a sincere attachment to the United States. On yesterday I received an address from the free people of colour , the original of which I now enclose for your perusal. To this address I made a verbal response: they were...
No alteration has taken place since our last, of which you have a duplicate under cover, excepting the receipt of the necessary orders, for the delivery of all the Spanish Posts in upper Louisiana, and at Nachitoches and it’s dependencies. But we have to apprize you of an unexpected occurrence of a most unpleasant nature. Early yesterday morning we were formally advised by Mr. Daniel Clarke,...
The French vessel which I mentioned to you in my last letter, has been brought to at Plaquemines, but not having yet received an official report from the officer, I am unable to give you a particular account of the passengers. The period allowed by the Treaty for the withdrawing of the French and Spanish forces from the ceded Territory expires on this day, and still little or no preparation is...
A vessel arrived at this port a few days since with fifty African negroes for sale. Being unwilling to permit so barbarous a traffic, if my powers authorized me to prevent it, I immediately applied to a Mr. Leonard the late Spanish Contádore at this place, a man of great integrity of character for information as to the laws and customs of Spain relating to the African trade, and received from...
On yesterday we had nearly witnessed in this city a serious riot. A guard of Spanish soldiers, being on duty at the house of the Marquis De Casa Calvo, (who was himself absent) and very much intoxicated, made an attack upon a sailor who was passing the street. The citizens interfered and beat off the guard. One citizen was slightly wounded and a Spanish soldier very much beatten. Early...