You
have
selected

  • Correspondent

    • Asquith, Lister
    • Jefferson, Thomas

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Asquith, Lister" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 11-20 of 26 sorted by date (ascending)
I received your kind and exceptionable Letter yesterday by Mr. Diot which gives me great Satisfaction to find he has Orders to assist us when in such great Distress for want of Provisions, which Favors we are not able to express our thanks for. The Circumstances that occurred since our arrival are: On our arrival in the Isle of Bas Roads the Officers came on board and I reported to them the...
St. Pol de Léon, 14 Nov. 1785 . Asquith has heard nothing from TJ since his letter of 12 Oct., but he encloses a letter from Picrel informing him that the case is to be settled at Paris. Diot says he has written TJ of this and thinks, since the arrangements were made in Brest, that Desbordes could give Asquith more information than he. At the advice of the judge of the admiralty, Asquith this...
I have received your letter of the 14th. inst. It was not till the 8th. of this month that I could obtain information from any quarter, of the particular court in which your prosecution was instituted, and the ground on which it was founded. I then received it through the hands of Messrs. Desbordes at Brest. I have sent to the count de Vergennes a state of your case, of which the inclosed is a...
St. Pol de Léon, 28 Nov. 1785 . They have now been in prison for fourteen weeks “and yet have no appearance of our releasement without you have got it finished at Paris.” Asquith heard from Desbordes, Frères that they had written to TJ advising him to try to have the case settled by the French ministry. “As they [the Farmers-General] could find no flaw against us for smugling they now pretend...
St. Pol de Léon, 5 Dec. 1785 . Acknowledges TJ’s “kind and most exceptionable Letter.” He is relieved to know TJ has received the necessary papers and finds only two errors in TJ’s statement of his case: “1st. The Register which was taken out by Capt. Charles Harrison (when I was sick) unknown to me for 21 Tons (as he inform’d me, to save port charges), but he did not own any part of her. 2nd....
We have just received our Sentence and Condemnation from Brest by the Hands of the Farmers Officers, which one of the Coppys I have sent inclosed and I cannot understand any thing of it. We are all now allmost distracted by their unjust Sentence and implore your protection, as we have your best assurances for it and intirely rely on you for your assistance as we are innocent of the Crime we...
St. Pol de Léon, 2 Jan. 1786. Has been daily expecting to hear from TJ since his letter of 23 Nov.; fears that the letters have been detained. Knowing that he and his companions are innocent of any crime, suspects they are being starved to force them to escape. They are being tortured in mind and body; have no fire; and the snow falls on them through the roof when they lie down. He is certain...
I have duly received your letter of the 2d. instant. The delays which have attended your enlargement have been much beyond my expectation. The reason I have not written to you for some time has been the constant expectation of receiving an order for your discharge. I have not yet received it however. I went to Versailles three days ago and made fresh applications on the subject. I received...
St. Pol de Léon, 16 Jan. 1786 . Has written four letters to TJ and, receiving no reply, fears they have been intercepted. Has been in prison five months; he and his companions are suffering from the cold weather, “often very wet by the rain and snow coming through the roof,” and distracted by fears for the welfare of their families; implores TJ to rescue them and hopes “the Justice of this...
St. Pol de Léon, 20 Feb. 1786 . Acknowledges TJ’s letter of 13 Jan.; but not having received a discharge, again begs for assistance; his “Pœple and self are almost all laid up by sickness occasioned by the colds and Damps of this place,” and are dejected “by the Constant insults of the pœple here”; they have been told that the Farmers General have so much influence in the courts that they can...