You
have
selected

  • Correspondent

    • Asquith, Lister
    • Jefferson, Thomas

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Asquith, Lister" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 1-10 of 26 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
As an unfortunate affair has happened to us and being subjects to Baltimore in Maryland, has taken the Liberty to implore your protection and assistance as far as lies in your power. Being bound from Baltimore to Liverpool with Flour and Tobacco and finding in Virginia that Tobacco would answer our Markets Better in Liverpool, discharged part of our Flour and one Hdd. of Tobacco in Hampton...
Please your Excellency Sir St. Pauls Prison Sep. 7th. 1785 At last our unhappy sentence is passed, our Vessel and Cargo condem’d and we are condem’d to pay 6000 Livres, a sum it is impossible for us to raise being in a strange Country. Hope for the Almightys sake you will take our unfortunate cause in Hand. We are condem’d to the Gallies for a crime we are innocent of and our families now will...
St. Pol de Léon, 8 Sep. 1785 . He wrote TJ the day before, with the news of their sentence by the farmers-general, and writes again in less agitation at the advice of Father John Mehegan. He begs TJ to intervene, for they have been in close confinement three weeks, are short of provisions, and are exceedingly anxious for their families. Encloses a petition of Father John “in our Favor as he...
Several of your letters have been received, and we have been occupied in endeavours to have you discharged: but these have been ineffectual. If our information be right, you are mistaken in supposing you are already condemned. The Farmers general tell us you are to be tried at Brest, and this trial may perhaps be a month hence. From that court you may appeal to the parliament of Rennes, and...
I received your kind and exceptionable Letter which has relieved my mind of a great deal of trouble. I left Baltimore on the 20th. of June and got down to Hampton Roads and, finding that all Tobacco would answer better than Flour, discharged 50 Barrels of Flour and one Hdd. of Tobacco, it not being very good. But before our Cargo came on board we were drove out to sea by a heavy Gale of Wind...
I have received your letter of Sep. 19. with your Log-book and other papers. I now wait for the letter from your lawyer, as, till I know the real nature and state of your process it is impossible for me to judge what can be done for you here. As soon as I receive them you shall hear from me. In the mean time I supposed it would be a comfort to you to know that your papers were come safe to...
St. Pol de Léon, 28 Sep. 1785 . “I am now convinced of the Villiany of the People we have here to deal with and beg in the name of God your protection and assistance.” After believing that Picrel had engaged a lawyer and paid him, they now find that the lawyer demands twelve guineas to take the case, and that “Picrel has deceived us the whole time and had a design himself on the Vessel. As we...
St. Pol de Léon, 3 Oct. 1785 . Asquith has received from Picrel a copy of a letter from “Mr. Maisoneiuve Floch Procureiur of Brest,” the lawyer engaged earlier by Picrel, who agrees now to take the case if Asquith advances him ten guineas, though he has already received three. Asquith is doubtful whether his last three guineas will satisfy. He had instructed Floch to write TJ a state of their...
I have received your letters of Sep. 28. and Octob. 3. but no information is yet received from your lawyer, so that I am utterly uninformed of the nature of the process instituted against you, and the court in which it is depending. Till I receive this I am unable to obtain advice how to interfere for your relief. That you may not suffer for want of money, I will advance for you what may be...
St. Pol de Léon, 17 Oct. 1785 . He has heard nothing from Floch himself but learns he can do nothing until he receives the prisoners’ papers, which were sent to him and the judge of the Court of Admiralty several weeks before. Asquith also learned from Father John Mehegan that the case will be settled at Paris by Vergennes and Calonne; the prisoners would surely have lost it at Brest “as the...