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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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Your kind letter my dear Mother as well as that of my kind Sister call for an answer and although the effort is almost too much for me I will endeavor to controul the pangs of my bursting heart and entreat you to compassionate and not condemn a grief which is beyond my reason to subdue had you witnessed the horrid circumstances of my Angels death you would pity and forgive me my heart is...
6 October Rose early and crossed in the Team Boat to Mrs. de Fish Kiln Landing Mr. de Wint having come over in his Carriage for us—found Caroline at the door who received us in the most affectionate manner and was very much astonished at seeing Mr. & Mrs. Johnson who they did not at all expect I was introduced to Mrs. de Wint a very fine Woman who gave us a kind and warm reception The Verplank...
Jany 1 1818 The Circle was extremely crowded. On our arrival Mr. A was ushered into a room where the Presidents aid’s were in waiting, and I was introduced by the President who met me at door into the Circular Hall where Mrs. Monroe was seated with Mrs. Hay and Miss Gouverneur. She rose immediately and received me with much ease and affability; I was followed by the Ladies of the heads of...
After a most fatiguing journey in which I suffered grievously we arrived at half past nine o’clock last evening beaten and bruised and scarcely able to go through the additional trouble of undressing to go to bed—Not a single event has occurred worth detailing and I can only write you a short Letter as my shoulders are too stiff to admit of my saying any thing more than that we are alive and...
In the utmost haste my dear Mother I write you a few lines merely to assure you of the health of the family many thanks for your very kind letter of the 15 of May which however would have made us all very unhappy had it not fortunately been preceded by one of the 12 of July brought by Mr Jones who likewise assured us you were recovered many many years are yet I hope in store for you and I...
I received with joy your letter of the eighteenth a few days since as I had suffer’d considerable anxiety at not hearing any thing of my children it is true I have no right to urge any one on this subject but having been compelled to leave them I cannot command my feelings and must trust to your kindness to let me hear frequently— I am very sorry to hear that George still continues subject to...
23d. received a note from Mrs. Monroe requiring my attendance at 1 oclock I went according to appointment and found Mrs. Monroe in her small Drawing Room ready to receive me—She opened the business by apologizing for the liberty she had taken but she really took such an interest ing in me that she had thought it right to speak to me on the subject of visiting and ettiquette She asked what was...
I have been so occupied in writing for Mr. Adams ever since his indisposition that I have really not had time to answer your kind Letters and have brought myself in debt to all my Correspondents and they accumulate so much that I am unable to satisfy their demands. My Boys are also at home which is another ample source of occupation as Mr. Adams’s time is of too much importance to the public...
We have this morning recieved your kind letter my dear Mother and I hasten to write you a few lines by a Vessel which I understand will sail immediately Mr. Adams is very well but so much engaged it will not be in his power to write by this opportunity having only notice of it late last night Mr Harrod is not yet arrived but is hourly expected—I shall be extremely happy to see him and shew...
It is long since I wrote you in consequence of a very severe indisposition which confined me to my bed ten days and to my chamber more than a fortnight—The time thus passed of course afforded but little to relate and still less to interest—On Tuesday evening 10 of March I drank Tea with Mrs. Sergeant a most charming woman, the Wife of a member of Congress from Philadelphia—It was a social...