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Harriet Welsh writes me that George and you intend to visit Mrs. de Wint during the vacation and that if your father grants you permission you intend to go on to Niagara—I had made a partial engagement to accompany Mr. & Mrs. de Wint to Niagara this fall but I do not feel quite sure that I shall be able to accomplish this purpose as your father tho’ he says I may go always appears to have...
I cannot imagine my Dear John what can be the reason of your not writing to me. You used to be a very regular correspondent, but I suppose the Ladies have such demands on your time you have none to bestow on your poor Mother. We are very happy to learn from Mr Pomeroy, that your Grandfather is so entirely recovered he tells us the old Gentleman has not looked so well this two years as he does...
I was so much occupied during my stop at Borden Town I could not answer your Letter therefore busy myself here having nothing to do with all the nonsense I can think of for pastime. You can easily conceive, the dreariness of my situation travelling alone with your father who though more of a than I can recollect since the earliest period of our marriage is still too much of a Statesman to be...
I write you a few lines my dear John in answer to yours which I received last night merely to say we are all well and your Grandfather better but we are so immerced in dinners and partys that my head is perfectly turned— Give my love to Johnson (Hellen), and tell him not to grieve—for I am glad the connection has failed as there is something in the conduct of all parties not altogether...
Being very well I hasten to write you and although you disclaim all merit in a certain transaction still to repeat my approbation of a conduct which does you so much honour and which I hope (although you must not expect) will be rewarded by the improvement and merit of its object—Should this not happen do not suffer the disappointment to mortify or wound your feelings or to damp any future...
I recieved your letter my dear Child only a few days since and am charmed to find that George and you are such good boys I am sure you are much obliged to Cousin Abby for your letters. and I you will soon learn to write them yourself I hope as they will afford me double pleasure George is now near ten years old and is I am sure too much of a man to play truant any more and I am sure you never...
Decbr. 3d Did not attend at Church Mr Ryland was to preach and his last sermon was such a strange medley of scraps and ends miserably put together I did not feel tempted to go again—remained at home all day. 4th The day was stormy and disagreeable—In the Eveng went into George Town to fetch Fanny Johnson. The Stage had not arrived and we drove to Mrs. Frye’s where we took Tea—She mentioned...
Yesterday brought me your Letter of the 7th which I was sorry announced a mishap which gave me some concern—I recommend you for the future on a rainy day to put your Seals in your pocket before you set out to school as a sure guard against such accidents— If your father will permit me I will lend you the American Revolution with pleasure as I am sure you will read it carefully and not injure...
Your Letter my dear John gave us great uneasiness on your Grandfathers account and we feel very anxious lest the violence of the shock should have injured his health. We hope to hear from you frequently and that your Letters may be welcomed as harbingers of good instead of ill news for the future— I propose to leave this City on the 14 as your father wishes me to travel in the Carriage I shall...
To say how much I was affected at not seeing you the day I left Boston would indeed be impossible as I supposed it was owing to the Woman’s having said we were at dinner that made you leave the house so suddenly and I could not bear the idea of your being refused admittance—I thank you very much for your very affectionate Letters which gave me the greatest pleasure and arrived so as to make me...
You who know with what painful sensations I saw you depart for College, can readily imagine how much my sufferings were encreased, when this hour arrived, in which I was to bid adieu to the home which had so kindly cherished me, where I enjoyed a felicity much beyond my deserts, and which has excited in my heart a sense of gratitude difficult to express. My poor companion with whom Doctor,...
It is now I suppose nearly a vacation time with you and you will take your flight to Quincy for a fortnight where you will no doubt enjoy yourself very much in the Society of your indulgent Grandfather and the family— Do tell me are there any hopes of Mrs. Clark’s forming a second connection—Beware of getting entangled in a quarrel with her during the vacation no matter from what cause or...
27th. Jany Remained at home all the morning in the course of which twenty cards were left—At five oclock our dinner party began to assemble—we sat down 22 under the expectation of a formal & stiff kind of meal as the company were almost almost all strangers to us—but they were very animated and cheerful and before dinner was over you would have thought we had been acquainted many years—They...
December 10 Recieved a charming visit from Mr. Bagot, who sat with me an hour and chatted very agreably. Not a word about Mrs. Hay—who is giving rise to a great deal of conversation about rank and station—She has assumed a tone with the Corps Diplomatique, which places them and herself in the most unpleasant disposition situation—I have been worried with enquiries about it, but have hitherto...
I have been so unwell the whole of this week my dear John, it has not been in my power to answer your Letter as soon as I wished—I observe all you say, and only answer that when you read Books worthy of remarks I will write you as fully as I do Charles who almost always gives me a subject—The Children of the Abbey, is a pretty thing, excessively romantic, but not calculated by any means to...
As I have already said every thing on the subject of your last which was necessary I will only make one observation which is that reputation is always proved by actions and the less we say about generally the better we guard it and preserve it— You are now verging on the Vacation. Are you likely to have a brilliant Commencement? who are the graduates of Note?—Who makes an entertainment?—. We...
It is always painful to be the bearer of bad tidings and yet it is a duty from which we cannot fly.—I have occasionally mentioned the dreadful state in which Lieut’ Clark has laid; that you might be prepared for that change, which was to release him from a world of suffering to a state of bliss—He terminated his life at eight o clock this morning after the most dreadful sufferings, but...
13 Went out to the Capitol to see the Senate with the Ladies after which we visited the Library and took another view of Trumbulls picture—This performed we next went to the Navy Yard—examined the famous Monument—took a look at the Frigate now on the Stocks and after gazing until we were satisfied returned home to dine—In the evening we all went to the French Ministers and passed a charming...
I yesterday received your Letter and was very much concerned to observe the depression of spirits under which you laboured, but the rapid approach of Spring will I hope restore you to all those blithsome feelings which are so charming and so natural to your nature character and disposition—. It is too true alas that in the attainment of the knowledge of human nature we are obliged to wade...
I have been so much engaged the last week at races parties and Ball it has been impossible for me to answer your last Letter or to write to Charles Eclipse as you have heard ran down poor Sir Charles who was totally unfitted by his lameness to oppose the pride of the North and I confess the race as it appears to me was altogether so unequal I cannot see any thing to boast of on the winning...
Tomorrow is the great National anniversary and at the same the anniversary of your birth which event was to me as joyful as the other to the nation; and I always hail its return with pleasure and gratitude, Oh may this sentiment exist as long as you I have life, and may no unpropitious event cast a cloud over the brightness of this day which hitherto has been a day of joy. accept my...
Feby 13—A very bad cold—The day very stormy which prevented my going out—Mr. Bailey passed the evening with us—The question on Genl. Jackson’s affairs appears to be given up in the Senate—The popular opinion is too favourable—and though the Gentleman from Georgia who is to take the lead, might have found it useful in procuring the attention of the Ministry in the Country which he is about to...
6 Feb My Boys went off in the six oclock Stage, and Mr: A– myself, and Mary went to the Representative chamber and heard Mr: Rice, one of the Indian Missionaries, who had great reputation in the Western States—I thought very little of him—there was a great attempt at eloquence, which however to my idea proved entirely abortive, his language was mean, and ill chosen, and when he rose at all...
I write to announce our safe arrival at this place from whence we propose to start on a visit of two days to Mrs. De Wint this afternoon to return on Friday night to meet your father and proceed in the Steam Boat on Saturday afternoon to Providence where I presume we shall remain until Monday Morning—As the Horses are very tired it is probable we shall take a Stage to Quincy and see you all on...
The extreeme distress of mind under which Mr Adams labours in consequence of our dear Mother’s distressing illness, totally incapacitates him from writing to you on the subject which excites in us both the most painful anxiety—. Most readily will I set out to Boston if in any shape I can afford assistance, and I should delight in giving every testimony of dutiful affection and respect to our...
I yesterday received your Letter announcing the death of Judge Tudor but the melancholy news which I had received from St Petersburg only half an hour before broke the shock as that comparatively was a calamity so dreadful that the death of the Judge appeared nothing more than an event which must naturally be expected—It is no doubt a distressing event to the family and sudden deaths are...
18 Feb Passed the day quietly at home excepting returning a few morning visits 19 Mr A. dined at Mr Lowndes’s and I called for Mr & Mrs: Smith and Mr: A. to accompany me to the French Ministers. Mr S declined going—We found a small company assembled and the party was tolerably agreeable—I was engaged at a Ball at Mrs: Gales’s and intended to go from Mrs: de Neuvilles quite early but Mr A....
By some means or other it would seem that one of my Letters to you have been lost—perhaps you had better enquire at the Post Office—I answered you immediately after you wrote about the desk and recommended you to take the one offered by Louisa Smith—I send you the dates of my Letters that you may ascertain whether any of them are missing 11th. 22d 29th March 18th and 23d April 24th. & 25th of...
It is a very long time my dear venerated father since I have written to you; but the events of yesterday were altogether so interesting I cannot refrain from giving you an account of them— The genl in his travels through this Country has been so much the publick idol, and the devotion of the people has been continued with so much fervour until the last moment of his residence among us, he...
As I feel very much concerned for your dissmission from College my Dear John lest you should have some debts that may embarrass you I beg you me immediately that I may find some plan if possible to extricate you from your most pressing difficulties without disguising in the least the real state of things—My means are very small but perhaps I may find some medium which may enable me to settle...
I should sooner have answered your Letter my Son had I not expected to hear that you had received Booth’s Journal the first Number of which was sent to you last Month its he is an object of great respect and attention to our little family here the neglect and coldness with which you appear to treat his literary production has been cause of offence to all and he has determined to retaliate by...
It is impossible for me to express the happiness I feel at the news which comes by so many different channels from Boston concerning you, & which has been so agreeably confirmed by yourself. the rapid improvement which is evident in your style & writing is itself a sufficient indication of the pains you are taking to cultivate your mind, and take all the benefit and advantage which your father...
Feby. 18th The Evening brought my expected guests or rather a small part of them and on the whole the party appeared to enjoy themselves tolerably well—The night was fearfully cold and my company left me early on account of the complaints of the Coach men who refusd to wait for them—We are drawing near a conclusion and I certainly shall not regret it—Some Music and some dancing— 19 Went out...
You tell me that the highest prize in the Lottery is only 5000 dollars therefore you have not purchased my Ticket as I wished to make an experiment of your luck I suppose you think 5000 dollars a paltry prize however I should like you to purchase me a ticket in any of the Lotteries in which you can procure one for $4 and 50 Cents, or 5 which I see advertised in all the Boston papers and beg it...
I yesterday received your highly complimentary Letter which of course gratified my affection very much. I will not say my vanity for I am by no means certain that your praise is merited; on the contrary I am almost always dissatisfied with my own Letters, which are always dictated by the impulse of the moment; very useless, and little or no attention paid either to language or style—In writing...
The day before yesterday our City was enlivened suddenly by the report of the ratification of the Spanish Treaty and every thing looked gay excepting my husband who gave no credit to the news when yesterday morning a cloud in the form of Capt Reid of the Hornet dispersed our sunshine and confirmed Mr. As doubts and destroying all the fond hopes of the too credulous citizens—Congress will of...
I will not apologize for not writing as I hate excuses none especially when they are bad or indifferent I hope your character is not changed for the worse and that whatever change may have taken place in you that your principles are still sound and fixed not withstanding I am aware that the theological controversies that are so fashionable in your part of the world are more calculated to...
& Miss Mason Capt & Mrs. Crane Mr. Kerby with several others Members of Congress—Mr. Petry came in the Eveng. and talked freely of the Bonaparté family He told me that while he was in Poland Napoleon was very much attached to a beautiful Polish Lady and that he (N.) rode fifteen miles every night during a fortnight at the risk of his life through the enemies Country to visit her—He likewise...
I am so concerned about Charles that I once more write to you on the subject and beg of you to let me know how he gets on and if you think there is any prospect of his being dismissed from College. His spirits appear to be so bad that I hope his fears are greater than there will be occasion for. But your utter silence concerning your brother is so extraordinary and when you consider his age so...
Your Letter distressed both your father and myself on account of the painful news it contained—but we were neither of us displeased with you as we were perfectly sensible of the motive both of duty and affection by which you were situated—We are still very uneasy at your Grandfathers situation altho I have had a letter from him since the receipt of yours which has induced us to hope that both...
8th: March—Was very unwell all the morning and the weather was extremely disagreeable—In the evening went to the Drawing Room which was very full—The wedding much talked of in consequence of which the Russian Minister asked me when they might pay their respects and offer their congratulations I told him I understood they were to receive their friends without form or ceremony I believed in the...
Your Letter and the pleasing information it contains has greatly delighted your father and I think you will now be rewarded by his full approbation of the exertions which you have made and which at last have proved successful—We shall certainly visit Boston as I wrote you and George has engaged to study with Mr Webster who is now here—Miss Hopkinson is at Alexandria to which place I took her...
As I know how much your time must be engrossed by your studies my Dear John altho’ the temporary loss of your correspondence will grieve me I will submit to it most patiently on account of the motive which does you so much honour—I observe that you appear to be a little mortified in your last Letter at what I remarked in one of my former ones which you somewhat misunderstood—The observation I...
You have at last much to my satisfaction, renewed a correspondence which ought never to have been interrupted, and that in the most acceptable manner to your parents, by an assurance of future attention and regularity—The accounts we receive of your conduct are very flattering, and we receive them as an earnest of what we may hope and expect as you advance in life, to reward us for the many...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...
Altho’ I write with difficulty I cannot resist the temptation and must gratify myself by writing to you and my Dear Charles even if I pay dear for it—Upon one subject the nearest to my heart I will say nothing lest I should say too much—In this world we must innure ourselves to disappointments and we must learn to meet them with patience and only remember them as incitements to greater...
Your last Letter my Dear John was indeed filled with grievous news and I sincerely pity the afflicted family who are left in a situation so melancholy—The shock must no doubt have been severe to your Grandfather although it was expected; but the strongest minds insensibly repel the idea of death until the inevitable doom is sealed, and we cannot fly from conviction by its sad and solemn...
Your sudden silence after the affectionate and unremitted attention you shewed during your dear Grandmothers illness and the total want of information since on the subject of the family in general has occasioned both your father and myself much uneasiness and we are counting the mails every day to meet fresh disappointment Your Fathers Messenger has just been and I flew down in the hope of...
December 11th. Went into Georgetown to see Mrs Otis, was not admitted Called on Mrs Smith and Mrs Frye both very well returned home to dinner Dr Forsythe from South America called in the evening, He too was soliciting a place to which a deaf ear was turned. 12th—Not well and could not go to church; the day cold and disagreeable Mary much better. Evening alone. 13th—Went out and paid visits and...
14th December. We were all so exhausted that we determined to keep quiet all day at home. Received a Note from a Milliner requesting I would go and look at his things, this is a thing which has happened several times—Am I so much in vogue? I am solicited to take great care of myself this Winter and not to get sick, Are People afraid of closed doors again? What a hollow hearted World How much I...