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    • Van der Kemp, François Adriaan
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Van der Kemp, François Adriaan" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
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The Reverend Dr Belknap and Dr Morse being upon a Journey into your Neighbourhood I have been desirous that they Should have an Opportunity of Seeing you, and that you Should have an Opportunity of Seeing them. They are clergy men of great Fame and what better of great Merit. I have not add any Thing more , assurances of unva esteem humble sert PHi : John Adams Papers.
I thank you for your favor of 24th Ult. I return the letter with the oration, because they are inseperably connected. I think the latter worth printing, at least as much so, as many others on the same occasion. I return it to you to save you the trouble of again transcribing it. Since you insist upon it, I am willing to think myself young, as long as the admonitions to the contrary are not too...
The information in your last letter, of your return to your garden and your records has given me great pleasure. The records are very interesting, and your translation of them will be an honourable and a durable Monument to your Memory Your friend and my friend Mr Tyng has told you truely that I am “constantly employed” and may add, beyond my Strength of body or mind. Never in my whole life...
A friend in need, is a friend indeed; you must certainly have read Shakespear, and have learnt from him, when you have once made a friend, to grapple him to your Soul with hooks of Steeal. You have been constantly grappling me for more than forty years—The newspapers have brought to me your correspondence with Mr. Yates, and that has introduced a correspondence between him and me And what is...
Yours of the 5th. and 9th are received. My Eyes and my hands forbid every unnecessary Word. I have read Lardner and Jones; the latter 50 Years ago, and twice Sinse; the last time within a year. They both give Us their opinion but not proofs. They take for granted the Authenticity of Gospels Acts Epistles and Apocalypse, and then produce them as Witnesses. Sillimans Stones are not So...
I thank you for your kind Letters I agree with you that we can never be thankful enough for the blessings we enjoy—I congratulate you upon the blessings you enjoy —and the prospects you have in your children and Grand Children—Virtuous children are the greatest comforts, and the greatest Blessings we old people can enjoy— I regret that I cannot write to you oftener As to your project of making...
Before I left The Massachusetts I had the Pleasure of receiving a Letter from you: But I learned from it, with Some Uneasiness that you meditate a Removal to a greater distance from us. I had Yesterday another Letter from you of the 23 of November. I thank you for introducing to me, Major Peter Van Gaesbeek, whom however I have not yet had the Pleasure to see as he happened to call when I was...
I have received your Letter, and am much concerned to perceive your Apprehensions that Affairs might take an unfavourable Turn. The Questions you do me the Honour to propose to me, are very difficult to Answer. I have ever been Scrupulous of advising Strangers to emigrate to America. There are difficulties to be encountered in every Exchange of Country. Arising from the Climate soil, Air,...
I Sincerely condole with you in the loss of your Friends Walker Wislar and Bray. I Sincerely Congratulate you on the Acquisition of an honourable Usefull and profitable Employment and Amusement for Life. And more cordially as it is a providential Rescue from your metaphysical and delirious Project of Writing Cosmogonies and Metempsichosies of Worlds. A Week before I recd. Your Letter, I...
In your last Letter you requested copies of my Letters to Dr. Price. They are inclosed— These letters and many others, and other writings and conversations to the same affect destroyed my popularity with mankind.—The Turgotests, the Condorcetians, the Rochefaucaultians the Brissotians the Jacobins and the Sans Cullotts—France took offence and pronounced me an aristocrat Rochefoucauldians; and...
The events of this month, have been to me almost overwhelming. They have excited my sensibility too much for a man almost ninety years to bear. The multitude of letters of congratulations which I have received I can never pretend to answer, for it fatigues me to dictate even a few lines—but none of these letters have been more cordially welcomed than that of my friend Van der Kemp. I...
At the hazard of the little Vision that is left me I have read your Travels in the Wilderness with as much Interest Pleasure and Instruction as Coxes or Moores or Crusoe’s or Gullivers. I have Sent the Manuscript to Alexander Bryant Johnson of Utica and requested him to return it to you by a safe hand. My dear Wife has been sick all Winter and is Still very week, tho’ We hope somewhat better....
This day I recd your favour of the 15 of last month you and I are in the same predicament. You are buried and forgotten as you Say in the Western Wilderness, and I am buried and forgotten at Mount Wollaston: But I believe you are happier than you were when bustling in Holland, and I am very Sure I have been happier for these four years passed than I ever was in any four of forty years before...
I believe I must endorse you over, or rather bequeath you as a Legacy to The Philosopher of Montecello! What! Why! Wherefore? Is not the Life of Jesus, in the four Evangelists? Where else can you find it? In the Gospell of St. Thomas? Of the Evangellian Jesus, The Philosopher of Monticello, knows as much as you know, and has Studied it with as critical Attention. And could write it as well in...
I see by your favour of May 10th that we must all grow Old—but you have not yet experienced one tenth part of the Infirmitys of Old Age—I am very glad your Physician promises you, that all will be well In your Researches do you find any Evidence of Persecutions of Quakers Anabaptists Witches or any–other Sectary’s amongst your Primitive Dutch Settle’rs in New–york—or amongst the cortier...
I have recd yours of Aug. 1802. I agree with you that “the deadly infection has not Spread thro every Limb.” But what Shall We Say when Such a Writer as Mr Callender, can write down the Administration of Washington, write up an administration of Jefferson and then write it down again. The Editors of Newspapers, have no Check, and yet have Power to make and Unmake Characters, at their Will; to...
I have just received your favor of the 20th of Jan. & am sensibly touched with the remembrance of our learned & ingenious friend whom I saw at the red Lyon in Leyden I thank you for his poems. Whether you will find purchasers for the edition of his juvenile poems you meditate I cannot say. My Countrymen I fear do not sufficiently attend to Greek & Latin after they leave College, perhaps not...
I have Sent to The Post Office this Morning, your Diploma, as Member of our Accademy. How many years ago ought you to have had it? I hope you will now communicate your Speculations to that Body through Mr Quincy their corresponding Secretary. I should advise Mr George Marsden to petition Congress for Relief, Setting forth his Service Commissions and present Circumstances. of Meteroric Stones I...
You have puzzled and confounded me, by your Letter of the 3 of Aug.—After allarming me with Some Suggestions or Suspicions of Infidelity in the Post office you Say “I Suppose the Crime is perpetrated in Massachusetts. Look at the inclosed Sealing. it is from you?” I thought this gave me a Right and made it my duty to open it, and Lo! a lovely Letter from your amiable Daughter to your worthy...
I had last night your letter of the 12th. the friendly Sentiments of which have tenderly affected me. The Affliction in my family from the melancholly death of a once beloved Son, has been very great, and has required the Consolations of Religion as well as Phylosophy to enable Us to Support it. The Perspects of that unfortunate youth were once pleasing and promising: but have been cutt off...
I owe you a letter or two I believe, and my Conscience smites me for the neglect,—and my daring attendance in the Convention a whole Month, threw me into a fever, which has confined me from the eighteenth of December— Yesterday I ventured out to Church, for the first time—Recluse as I have been, I have had opportunity to read, and here read, a great deal of the Current Literature of the...
I thank you, dear Sir for your favours of 7. and 20th. Ult. Messrs Everett and Mr Ticknor will have the benefit of your Introductions. Oh! that I had been So introduced when I entered Holland a forlorn Pilgrim in 1780, without a Single Line of Introduction to any body. What a Knighterrant I have been? There has been too much Said about Franklins Plagiarism. If he was guilty, which I do not...
In Answer to your kind favour of the 21st. I have had a very feeble Winter and am Still afflicted with paines and Imbecilities which render it very difficult to take the exercise necessary for my health. J. Q.s Report must speak for itself. I am not a Judge of it: but Farrar who is, and who has read it with care Speaks well of it. If a Reviewer can be found in France or England to tear it to...
I have recd Condorcet, in good order and your favour of 20th. Ult. Enfields History of Philosophy, is worth many Condorcets. This great Work is drawn up from Brucker’s “Historia critica Philosophiæ”; an immense Work in half a dozen folio Volumes of Greek and Latin. Can you give me the Sketch of this Brucker? Who was he? Neither Brucker nor his Abridger, had Seen the Asiatic Researches; nor...
I have recd your favors of the third, and am much obliged to you and to Mr. Mappa for your Observations on the generation of shell fish &c My Privilege of franking extends to all Letters and Packetts. I return your letter to Chandler Livingston with this, and will return that to Mr. Boon, in a short time. I can afford you no ideas on the Subject of the mammoth because I have none. The Spirit...
As Misery is Said to derive Some consolation from the Misery of others; your Letter of 18. Septr. has given me Some miserable Comfort, to find to find that your Batavian Predecessors in New York were not much more tollerant than my Yankee Ancestors in New England. But I admire your East India Company and their Director, and their Threat, of the Authority of their H. M. the States General. How...
Alexander Hill Everett Esquire, a Genteman of the Bar in Boston, who had his Law Education in the Office of my son John Quincy Adams: and accompanied him to Russia, five or Six years ago, and afterwards travelled, in various parts of Europe, is to be Secretary of Legation to our Embassy to Holland. He is elder Brother to the Reverend Mr Edward Everett, and as great a schollar. He wishes me to...
Your favour of the Sixth of July has afflicted me. My Minister Mr Whitney lately told Us, what I had well known for more than 70 Years, that “Afflictions multiply upon Us, as we advance in Years” A whole flock, a whole drove, a whole herd of Calamities have huddled together upon me in the last Year. The List of them would astonish You. But I Am not in the habit of distressing my friends with...
I have recd. your kind favour of the 4th. of March and thank you for your kind rememberance of me, but I am overwhelmed with an oppressive correspondance at an age when I can neither write nor read; and this must be my apology for making so unequal returns to you for your goodness. I rejoice that your energies are so usefully employed. Your translation I am convinced will be useful to the...
James Otis Counsellor, Colonel &c &c &c Said to me Some fifty or Sixty years ago “John; when I meet with good Luck or bad luck, I Say nothing about either; because I know that more will be glad than grieved at my Misfortunes, and more will be mad than glad at my Prosperity.” This Old Fellow understood Mankind; and So do I. and therefore, when I am happy I never boast of it; and if I were...