You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
  • Correspondent

    • Adams, John

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 5

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 1-10 of 55 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
When I take a retrospective view of the innumerable obligations which I owe you, not only as the revered Parents of my husband but as the kindest and best of friends, my heart expands with filial gratitude yet I know not how to attempt an expression of my feelings. After a residence of five years under your roof which has been endeared to me by some of the most interesting events of my life,...
I have received your Letters of 10. 15. and 16. Your solicitude for my Health may Subside. I am pretty well—I had a cold, not a bad one, and something of the Inflammation in my face of last Spring, but it is gone. Rush gave me such a Dose of Salts that I thought it not fit to go out to Congress next day. But the day after I was well enough...I am Old—Old very Old and never shall be very...
I am grieved beyond measure at your returned indisposition: but hope it will not be long. Your sons arrival I hope will raise your Spirits and give you strength. To Day I find the Weather pleasant and must take a Walk.—Mrs Cushing hopes to see you in a month. The Court rises tomorrow. I am afraid I cannot see you so soon. I shall have Business enough after Congress is up. Forreign affairs,...
I have no line from you, since the 13th at Brookfield. There has been so much rainy weather as to have made travelling impracticable for you, some part of the time, and the roads disagreable at all times.—If your health fails not, Patience will bear the rest. We went to the Presbyterian Church yesterday and heard Mr Grant a young calvinistical Presbyterian of a good style and fair hopes....
I have been very happy, with our Thomas Since his Arrival: He runs about with his black head and blue Coat among his old Quaker Aquaintances, who all accost him in the friendly style “Thomas how dost thee do?” He Seems inclined to Settle in Phyladelphia: but will not determine till he goes to Quincy and makes Inquiries there.—I have laid before him Quincy & Phyladelphia with their Advantages...
My last Letter from you was of the 25 of Nov. I have been anxious least you might have taken cold by too early an Attempt to go to Church and ride out. But I hope for a Letter to Day. I am almost afraid to send you the enclosed Letters. Yet I think I ought not to withold them. I hope every day to hear of our dear Thomas’s Arrival. I have had a cold as usual upon coming to this place: but...
I have received your letter of the 31st of August by Captain Brownson. I saw in an American Paper that Grandpapa has been on board the Seventy four which is in the command of Commadore Bainbrige and thought it a very fine Ship and and am in hopes of having a great many more by my return. I do not like England near so well as America nor do I think I should like any country so well as my native...
I recd to day your favr of 24 and it made the day more tolerable. Your health and Spirits always promote mine. We have had more Company to Day than ever upon any occasion. Thirty or forty Gallons of Punch, Wine in Proportion and Cake in Abundance. The News by The America Captn. Jenkins arrived at Newbury Port made every body gay but me. Not a Word of Thomas Boylston Adams. I shall be uneasy...
From Williams’s We went to Worcester took an early dinner at Barkers, and proceeded on to Drapers in this Town where We put up. Children you know when they are toothing, are Somewhat fretful, and the Toothing of the Second Childhood, is equally apt to make peevish. But though my Mouth is so sore as to give me a sore throat and an head Ach, I am neither fretful nor peevish: if I knew you could...