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We Stopped at the Governors to take Leave and he told Us the News of last night, which has regaled Us on the Road. We watered at Watertown and reached this Inn at half after one. We hope to reach Williams’s at Marlborough, and Sleep there this night. I strive to divert the melancholly thoughts of our Seperation, and pray you to do the Same. Mrs Smith I hope will keep Up her Spirits and the...
At Flaggs We were favoured by a civil Passenger in the Mail Stage with a Newspaper of this day, and read the Accounts mentioned by the Governor in the Morning. The Letter from Admiral Nelson is still wanting. We stopped at the Gate of Mr Packard, alighted and made a Visit to Mrs Quincy & Mr & Mrs Packard. All very kind, friendly and polite. Much Anxiety for your health, many kind Inquiries and...
From Williams’s We went to Worcester took an early dinner at Barkers, and proceeded on to Drapers in this Town where We put up. Children you know when they are toothing, are Somewhat fretful, and the Toothing of the Second Childhood, is equally apt to make peevish. But though my Mouth is so sore as to give me a sore throat and an head Ach, I am neither fretful nor peevish: if I knew you could...
From Captain Draper at Brookfield we went to Springfield thirty one miles to dinner. Parsons has removed and a Mr Squire of Durham in Connecticutt has taken his house. We fared as well as usual and after Dinner crossed the River and reached this House Austins before sun sett. Our Horses go like Birds. Clinker capers and rears and kicks and goes Sideways enough to make Louisa fly out of the...
You never received a Letter from Berlin but with Pleasure: and this I dare say will not be the first. From Austins in a lowry Morning We proceeded to Hartford and dined at Bulls. A polite Invitation from the County Court to dine with them was declined, and We came on immediately to Squire Rileys. The Coachman thought it would be too hard upon the Horses to go to Wallingford. I have now read...
From Rileys in Berlin, We went to Newhaven 26 miles to dinner at your Friends Mrs Smiths who were very respectfully inquisitive after your health, and very sorry to hear an Account of it from me, not so flattering. A Visit from Dr Dwight detained Us agreably for a short time but We found enough to cross the Ferry over the Housatonnic by sunsett and soon reached Lovejoys in this Town. We had...
From Lovejoys at Stratford We put off Mr. Shaw with a part of the Baggage by the Stage for East Chester. Mrs Smith and the fair Caroline came with me to Norwalk to dinner at Gregories, where We were very comfortable. We rode in gentle snow & rain all day and Arrived at Webbs at Night, where We put up till Monday. My Horses want a day of rest. From Quincy to Stanford, within 22 miles of East...
We Spent Sunday at Stanford at Webbs, went to Meeting forenoon and afternon, and on Monday went to Dinner at East Chester. Tuesday in a Violent Snow storm went into New York. Dined and Slept at Charles’s. Wednesday crossed the Ferry and went to Elizabeth Town. This day We came five and thirty miles to this Place. From New York our poor Horses have waded and dragged the Carriage through Snow...
From Kingston Van Tilsburg We came Yesterday 45 Miles to Markett Street. For once I have Accomplished a Journey from Quincy to High Street without one escorting Man or Horse. This was done by Invention as I will explain some other time. I found all well and in good order and I slept soundly last night, tho the House looks to me like a Desart.—I pray that you may have Slept as well as William...
I have recd yours of 13 and 15th. rejoice that you are able to write, and pray you to keep me informed, of your own health & of Mr Cranch and Boylston Adams. The inclosed Letter from Mrs Johnson I Send without loss of time. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have recd yours of 18th and none later... Your Company here is much desired by every body: but by none so much as me. My Occupation in Business is so incessant, that I could have little time to pass with you—but that little every day would be prescious and invaluable. You express a Willingness to come on: but the thought of your attempting it without consulting your Friends and Physicians,...
Your Letter of the 25 Nov. has revived my heart. I rejoice at Your real Recovery and hope it will be confirmed so that you may with the Advice of your Physicians come on this Winter to me. But I cannot bear the thought of your Attempting it, without their Consent. I am of Opinion with our Neighbours about the Barn. Barlow to Baldwin I have seen and despise the Letter as much as I have for some...
My last Letter from you was of the 25 of Nov. I have been anxious least you might have taken cold by too early an Attempt to go to Church and ride out. But I hope for a Letter to Day. I am almost afraid to send you the enclosed Letters. Yet I think I ought not to withold them. I hope every day to hear of our dear Thomas’s Arrival. I have had a cold as usual upon coming to this place: but...
Your Letters of Nov. 29, Dec. 2. and 3 affect me very tenderly. The low Spirits, Effects of long and exhausting Sickness are apparent: but these are Evils of a serious nature. I pray you to banish as much as possible all Gloomy Thoughts and be very cautious to avoid every thing which may endanger a return of your old Disorders. To reconcile you to your fate I have a great mind to give you a...
Rejoice with me, that I have this Day finished my Ceremonies with the two Houses. Their Answers to the Speech have been civil and I have given them civil Replies. My St. Anthonys fire attacked me again after I had been here a few days—But it has given me no Pain and is better—almost gone off. It must be the Air or Water of this place that gives it me. The H. of R. will dispute about the Alien...
With a great deal of snow upon the Ground it is now plentifully snowing. There must be an unusual Quantity upon the Earth. I suppose you have it very deep. Our Men and Teams must have had a terrible Jobb to get the Lumber home: but I hope it is all compleated e’er this. To Day at two Dr. Ewing & Mr. Snowden are to dine with me and tomorrow at four about 30 Senators and Reps...I have not had as...
I have received your Letters of 10. 15. and 16. Your solicitude for my Health may Subside. I am pretty well—I had a cold, not a bad one, and something of the Inflammation in my face of last Spring, but it is gone. Rush gave me such a Dose of Salts that I thought it not fit to go out to Congress next day. But the day after I was well enough...I am Old—Old very Old and never shall be very...
I have rode in the Coaches with Mr Shaw over Grays Ferry and round by Hamiltons Woodlands over the Upper Ferry home, about ten miles Kiggin says. more beautifull Slaying never was seen. The snow not as with you excessively deep, but enough to cover all the Earth and deep enough to afford a very smooth path and beautifully white as Innocence itself. Yet the sun melts the Snow and it runs from...
I hope you have health enough to bear to share with me some of my Griefs. I have determined to do a Thing this day, which puts my Phylosophy to a Tryal. The Lt Gen. and Major Generals have recommended Col Smith to the Command of a Regiment. This is a Degradation of him to which I would not consent, without his Consent. I have written to him hoping that he would forbid the nomination. But his...
If I had the Logodiarrhea, you would hear from me oftener than you do. When Thomas leaves me, which will be some day this Week, I shall be more Solitary in my own Judgment than ever. But I must let him go to see you, both to gratify him and cure you. After he shall have been some time at Quincy I hope to hear that your health is quite established. He seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia...
I recd to day your favr of 24 and it made the day more tolerable. Your health and Spirits always promote mine. We have had more Company to Day than ever upon any occasion. Thirty or forty Gallons of Punch, Wine in Proportion and Cake in Abundance. The News by The America Captn. Jenkins arrived at Newbury Port made every body gay but me. Not a Word of Thomas Boylston Adams. I shall be uneasy...
Three Vessells have arrived from Hambourg Since Thomas was there. The inclosed will shew you that he chose the Alexander Hamilton of New York. By this means he will escape the Dangers of our Massachusetts Bay; and I hope soon to hear of his Arrival. The General Officers nominated Smith for the command of a Regiment—I nominated him to the Senate who, after a warm opposition and a day or two’s...
We have the Pleasure of your Letters to the 3d. I think it is not worth while to bid for Mrs Veseys four Acres. The Price will be twice or thrice the Worth and I have no desire to enlarge my Borders by purchasing such scraps. Indeed I have land enough and too much, unless I could attend to its cultivation.—In that Situation Land is an Object of Envy. And I am willing that some Tradesman should...
I thank God it is now in my power to give you the pleasure you desired of receiving from me a chearful Letter. This Moment they brought me from the Post Office a Letter from our dear Thomas dated the 12 informing me of his Arrival at New York. He will come on to Phyladelphia and only laments that he cannot have the pleasure of embracing both his Parents at once. His Passage has not been...
Yesterday, Tuesday when the Levee Room began to be thin Brisler came running in, with the delightful Sounds “Sir, Mr. Adams is up Stairs.” I was not long in mounting the escalier and had the high Pleasure of embrasing my dear son Thomas after an Absence of four Years & an half.—We had a very happy Evening and he has had a real nights rest after the fatigues of his Voyage & Journey. He seems in...
I have been very happy, with our Thomas Since his Arrival: He runs about with his black head and blue Coat among his old Quaker Aquaintances, who all accost him in the friendly style “Thomas how dost thee do?” He Seems inclined to Settle in Phyladelphia: but will not determine till he goes to Quincy and makes Inquiries there.—I have laid before him Quincy & Phyladelphia with their Advantages...
I am as much of a Solitudinarian as Frederick the Conqueror. He was constantly Saying at Sixty Je Suis vieux, cassé, Surannée &c &c &c I may Say the Same and have the honor to resemble him in this particular: But I shall never imitate his Idolatry for Voltaire. His Materialism appears to me very Superficial. He insists upon being all matter, without knowing what matter is. The Monades, the...
In my solitude in Markett street, I find nothing so sociable as your Letters—those of 18 & 20th. are this moment recd.—Your health & Spirits are a great Improvement of mine. I have avoided the Epithets perfidious and unprincipled as much as I could, but neither they nor any that could be borrowed from the Hebrew & the Greek would be too strong, for the House of Mass to Use.— My Religion you...
On Tuesday Mr T. B. Adams left Us at Eleven in the stage for New York & Boston and consequently Quincy.—I should have been glad to have held him till I could carry him with me: but I thought it my Duty to comply with his desire, both for his sake and yours.—He Seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia.—He would have a happier Life, and be a more important Man in Quincy: But I must do & say as...
Yours of 25 Ult. is received. Thomas is to Sett off from N York to day from for Quincy and I wish him a pleasant Journey, which the fine Weather and convenient Snow promises. An happy Sight of his Friends, will come of course, without Accidents. He found his Father, forty Years Older than when he left him, and if he finds his Mother advanced only ten, it may be an agreable disappointment to...
I have just recd. yours of Feb. 1. and thank you for the Book. We had one before, from the Bookseller here who has them for Sale. Dr. Tufts may draw. You had better engage the Oats. French may have Belchers place. Congress will not Sitt longer than March: and I calculate upon Weeks too—But fear I shall be detained sometime after Congress departs. Last night I must needs go to the Play and had...
I am grieved beyond measure at your returned indisposition: but hope it will not be long. Your sons arrival I hope will raise your Spirits and give you strength. To Day I find the Weather pleasant and must take a Walk.—Mrs Cushing hopes to see you in a month. The Court rises tomorrow. I am afraid I cannot see you so soon. I shall have Business enough after Congress is up. Forreign affairs,...
Your last Letter, which I have recd was dated the 10th.—I have one from Mr Thomas at Brookfield of the 8th.—I hope your ill turn was soon over and that your health is reestablished. What the ultimate determination of our Son will be I cannot conjecture.—I would not overpersuade him. Phyladelphia is on many Accounts, a good place. My Inclination as well as yours is for Quincy: his for...
I went last night to the Ball, where the Company Suffered more by the cold which was excessive than I ever knew any Company Suffer in my Life. The Dancers only were comfortable. I came home and went into a warm bed and had a fine Perspiration, occasioned I believe by my drinking three Glasses of Madeira Wine at supper and two more after I came home, which has relieved me from all cold and I...
I have just recd yours of 14th.—it has laid in the Post office I suppose since saturday. The subjects of Mr J. Q. A.s Agents are horrible to me. I will therefore dismiss them. Thomas’s Predilection for Phyladelphia, I suppose will determine him.—Alass! Nelly is married poor Boy! and I suppose some of the Six sisters will catch the Child in the Trap without a Groat and without Connections! This...
I have been so overwhelmed with Business at the Close of the session of Congress and Since, that I have not been able to write you for several Days. Mr Grove desired me to tell you that Mr William Smith your Nephew is married to a very amiable young Lady the Daughter of a rich Father. What he means by a rich Father I dont know.—I congratulate you & Louisa on this Event. I cannot say whether I...
I cannot say when I shall be able to sett out. But I shall loose no time here. When the Public Business is in such a state that I can leave it, I shall go, be the Roads as they may.... I expect bad travelling all the way. Trenton has indeed taken the Insurgent. But we have a silly Insurgence in Northampton County in this State, which will detain me, I suppose, some days. This State is not a...
We arrived on the 10th. I, much oppressed by one of my great Colds, which is now going off.—I could obtain only one little Room and one little bedroom but We can make a shift. I came here more loaded with Sorrow than with Rheum. Sally opened her Mind to me for the first time. I pitied her, I grieved, I mourned but could do no more. a Madman possessed of the Devil can alone express or...
I Sent you a Letter this morning before I recd yours of the 13. from Brookfield. I rejoice that you had arrived so far and born your Journey so well: but the Weather has been so wet that I doubt whether you have been able to reach East Chester to day. I am more convinced that the Air is a great Repository of Diseases and that it is impossible to guard against them. Be always ready. Yet I now...
I have written you but once since I bid you farewell. I was seized in Connecticutt with one of those direful Colds, which have sometimes brought my frame into danger and I was afraid to let you know how ill I was. I am now so much better as to be able to do Business. We have no News of you since the ninth indeed since the Note in which you told us of James’s fever. The Weather has given us...
I have no line from you, since the 13th at Brookfield. There has been so much rainy weather as to have made travelling impracticable for you, some part of the time, and the roads disagreable at all times.—If your health fails not, Patience will bear the rest. We went to the Presbyterian Church yesterday and heard Mr Grant a young calvinistical Presbyterian of a good style and fair hopes....
Your favour of the 20th has been to Phyladelphia and came back to me only last night: nor was this the fault of the Post Office—The Letter was addressed to Phyladelphia. It gave me great Joy and relieved me from much anxiety. I had recd. no news of you since your Letter of 13 from Brookfield. We had a sharp frost last night. Ice this morning on a Tub of water at the Door, a quarter of an Inch...
I am favoured this morning with yours of the 23d.—This is Accession day you know. I shall always consider it as a red Letter day: a fortunate day. I am happy to know that you are comfortably situated. I pray you to live in all Things at your own Expence and be no Burthen to Mrs. Smith or the Lt. Col. I am pretty well recovered of my Cold, but it has reduced my flesh. James Has found a...
I have recd yours of 24th and thank you for your relation of our little domestic affairs at Quincy. Brisler did not arrive last night as you callculated. His Children may detain him longer than you expected.—Some of the public Offices are about removing to Phyladelphia this Week. I can Send James with my Horses and Charriot to meet you at Hoebucken Ferry or Elizabeth Town or any other Place...
I have yours of 26 by Brisler and that of the 28th. this Morning. Thomas is in Phyladelphia and Brisler with his Family are going off this morning in the Stage. He will write me this Evening or tomorrow.—I expect to hear from you when and where you intend to Set out, and where you intend to be.—The offices of Treasury & State are gone to Phyladelphia. War, Navy & Law remain here, for...
I take up my pen to mingle with you and Mrs. Adams the feelings of our Great Affliction for the Death of General Washington. A better Man and a Greater General never lived. I have lost a real And Sincere friend who would protect Me. I now look up to you Sir to protect me in my rights and from knowing you here I shall feel the Influence of your Protection. Since I had the Honour of Seeing you...
I recd your favour of the 2d by Mr. Dexter and this morning from Mr. Gerry an account of your health on the 4th. which have relieved me from some anxiety as I had recd no Letter from you since you were in N. York. I have seen many Cities and fine Places since you left me and particularly Mount Vernon. Mrs Washington and her whole Family very kindly enquired after your health and all your...
I wrote you this morning, But was not particular. It will be Six or Seven days before that or this can reach you. When you write me afterwards you may direct your Letters to remain at the Post Office at New Haven or Hartford or perhaps New York. I shall Sett out on my Journey northward on Monday the 16th at latest, but shall not ride more than twenty miles a day. I expect it will take me 30...
We arrived here last night, or rather yesterday at one o Clock and here we dined and Slept. The Building is in a State to be habitable. And now we wish for your Company. The Account you give of the melancholly State of our dear Brother Mr Cranch and his family is really distressing and must Severely afflict you. I most cordially Sympathize with you and them. I have Seen only Mr Marshall and Mr...
I recd last night your Letter of the 11th. Your Girls and Mr Shipley arrived in good health and Spirits. I shall Send the Charriot this morning to meet you. It would be a great pleasure to me to go in it, but I am so engaged in indispensable business that I know not how to leave it and another thing of Some importance is your Son may take a Seat with you & Suzan in the Charriot and that will...