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mr Dexter will come to Boston tomorrow for the Trunks you must go with him to mr Crufts who when you pick out the Trunks will deliver them—I See that nobody here will attend to them if I do not—they are lodged at mr Thorndikes Store Custer lies very dangerously sick your GM MHi : Adams Papers.
So, so master John, your Back is up, because you have not been written to, as often as you thought your dignity required—why I really think there is Some reason for you to complain of your Hingham School Mates—but I beleive they are Scatterd now, not one of them remaining with mr Thimbull who were your companions—new ones Succeed Politeness requires that notice Should be taken of letters of...
I received your Letter by mr Beals, and was very glad to learn that you and your Brother had enterd School you will very soon get familiar with it, and if you do as well as you know how, you will not be behind your Class. If Charles is really unwell; mrs Welsh will give him something to take, and he must restrain his appetite which was too keen for the season of the Year. I would have you call...
enclosed is the money which mrs Welsh advanced upon your account which you will pay her, and get her to Sign the Receit enclosed. you have not sent your shoes to be mended—& Charl e s if bare foot I have no compassion for as he would not take the trouble to call upon the shoe maker, he ought to feel the concequence—I Shall expect to see you on Saturday your affectionate G M MHi : Adams Papers.
By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
I have heard, with some surprize, your proposition to Mr Adams that we should once more take up our residence with you. It is not unnatural that you should wish to have your Children with you, but with so numerous a family as ours it cannot be expected that we should at all times promote your enjoyment, and there may be many times when the necessary wants and recreations of Children would be a...
The past week has scarcely been marked by any occurrence worth relating in a letter, the weather after having been intensely warm on Sunday and Monday cooled off and we have had an Easterly storm ever since. This makes me quite dull as I prefer the Sun with all his fires. General La Fayette after having thrust his benign countenance among us; has gone to other places to make them happy for a...
On this day, one which in this part of the country is considered much as Thanksgiving day is in New England, I beg leave to express my wishes for your welfare & comfort during the cold weather which accompanies the Season in which the festival comes. It is not properly speaking a festival this Year with us as it comes on a Sunday, but the family dinner which for years past hast happened at my...
It was an unexpected pleasure which I received in your letter of the 17th. of last month, as I had not calculated upon your making such an exertion merely for me. If by writing I can do aught to amuse you a moment I shall think that I am well repaid but my vanity was not so great as to desire an answer, however gratified I may have been at receiving one. The General La Fayette is near on his...
My last letter I believe, evinced a degree of excitement very uncommon for me. But the transactions of that week were of a nature to act upon the blood of persons less impetuous even than myself. And the feeling was shared by almost all persons in the city. You are probably aware of what took place the day before I wrote although at that time I was ignorant of it myself. Persons will praise or...
I am glad to find you so happy at college and I myself assure you I feel as much so here there is one thing I regret and that is the loss of Mr Gould for certainly let Ironside be himself whatever genius he may yet he does not know the right way of keeping school nor will he till he keeps order; but as it is now every boy in the school is talking from the minute he goes in till he comes out. I...
The summer has come upon us very rapidly without giving us any of our usual Spring weather. Some few days within the past week have been almost as warm as any during the last summer. This brings us at least peace and quiet. Almost all strangers have left the place and many members of Congress. Both houses adjourn tomorrow, having been excessively hurried in their business during the week....
The warm season has come again and delightful as it is to me, is no doubt also very acceptable to you, Sir. The prevailing rule I believe, is a moderate heat, and one which is perhaps better adapted to afford ease to you than extremes either way. My attachment to warm weather excludes any idea of a medium or rather of what is commonly called so. And it is for this reason that I prefer the...
Since my last letter the whole family have been suffering from violent colds. I did not escape lightly, on the contrary, I was two days in greater trouble than was ever occasioned me by any cold before. My father has also been attacked and indeed every member of our family in regular order. To make the assertion more general, I might say that the whole City had been under the influence of this...
Another fortnight has passed since I had the honour to address you, and the end of it has found me but little wiser than the beginning. It has in fact been spent in the lounging dissipated manner which Washington society so soon produces. My seceding from society produced so much dissatisfaction in the family, that I have again thrown myself into the middle of the stream and my law in...
The past week has brought us summer weather and makes the city look as green as it is wont, in the month of May. This appearance is the more strange to us, as we do not associate easily with it the idea of Congress. But as we are to have a session here until June this season there will be abundant time to become reconciled to this state of things. Politics are now much the order of the day as...
I was much delighted yesterday by the receipt of the letter from you. It assured me that you was still in good health and spirits, about which things I was a little anxious, from the time I had heard of your intention to “submit” as Mr Browere not inappropriately terms it. I had been very much incommoded I must confess, in the operation, as my hair and ears were not so easily extracted from...
"Who doth time gallop withal?" Instead of answering this as Shakespeare has done, I would say that it gallops with persons in the days of youth and pleasure without any great care to oppress them. Such I deem mine to be and such is the passage of time. It is hardly possible to keep the regular count of the weeks as they go, and to notice the revolution of months, which has already brought me...
I have even less than usual of interest to relate today, since Tuesday last, I have been entirely at home owing to a slight attack of sickness. And my time has been employed in reading the later productions of the day and thereby making up a deficiency which I have long been guilty of. Indeed it is such a waste of time generally speaking that were it not for the ugly appearance one makes in...
One week has passed already since my arrival here and to us by no means a quiet one. General La Fayette arrived two days after me and has since engrossed almost all our attention. Dinner has succeeded to dinner and party to party, although the weather has been warm constantly. We now enjoy a few days of quiet as my Father and John have accompanied the General and suite and will not return for...
An unaccountable fit of dullness and inability to do any thing, prevented my writing to you on last Sunday, the weather is of such a nature as to create languor to an astonishing degree. It is very warm and humid which produces colds almost universally. Our family has not escaped for my brother and Elizabeth have both been affected and I although free from cold, have not been in a State to...
Time has slipped by most unaccountably during my resolutions constantly expressed of writing to you. And I can give little or no account of it. The arrival of the family safe and sound at home again was matter of so much gratification after my anxieties that I have scarcely been sufficiently composed since to do any thing. And each day has closed with the consciousness on my part of much left...
In the present dearth of news, and of every thing to make a letter interesting, I am afraid I shall only be very stupid in my attempt to amuse. But since it is the day on which I am bound to write and you expect it from me, I hope this will be sufficient apology for any want of animation which you may perceive. The monotonous course of life so very secluded as the one in which I now live gives...
A fortnight has passed over, since I last addressed you, and scarcely any thing of interest has happened. The City having considerably recovered from the severe epidemic which has been raging here, the gaity is becoming rather more extensive, and the number of Strangers who accompany the Supreme Court upon its Session here, have a tendency to enliven us. The town is always most full at this...
I Thank Heaven my dear Grand father that I am so happy as to announce to you the Election of Uncle, by 13 states—It is indeed Virtue triumphant & an event which will add much to your happiness—I never saw a stronger expression of real feeling than in an old Gentleman, a perfect stranger to all the family, who came in great haste from the Capitol to congratulate Aunt—God knows says he I...
Sensible of the honour I received by your permitting me to prefix your name to the second and third editions of this work, I am desirous that the present should appear under the same respectable and distinguished patronage. The talents and virtues which you have exhibited, both in public and private life, will, I trust, be duly appreciated by the rising generation; and it is my ardent wish,...
The information in your last letter, of your return to your garden and your records has given me great pleasure. The records are very interesting, and your translation of them will be an honourable and a durable Monument to your Memory Your friend and my friend Mr Tyng has told you truely that I am “constantly employed” and may add, beyond my Strength of body or mind. Never in my whole life...
I thank you for a very pleasant letter, and I supplicate a continuance of them—I have given up the hopes of seeing the family, or any part of it this Year—but when the Marquis is gone I hope to have letters from your Brother, John, and yourself, which will help to keep up my old spirits a little longer, my heart & wishes and Prayers are with you forever—We have nothing to tell you here but...
In reply to your question, upon what map did the Commissioners trace the boundary line described in the Treaty of 1783—I answer that it was Mitchells map. And to your question, whether by the Long Lake intended by the treaty was meant the Long Lake laid down in Mitchells Map,—I answer, that it was, & that we used no other authority for places named in the description of the boundary line than...
I ought not to have neglected so long to write you an account of the delightful visit I received from M r and M rs Cooledge, M rs C— deserves all the high praises I have constantly heard concerning her, She entertained me with accounts of your sentiments of human life, which accorded so perfectly with mine that it gave me great delight—In one point however I could not agree—she said, she had...