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  • Recipient

    • Tudor, William, Sr.
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    • post-Madison Presidency
    • post-Madison Presidency
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Tudor, William, Sr." AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
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“Vanity of Vanities, all is Vanity!” The French have a distinction, between Eulogy and Apology. I know not under which of these heads to class, the following anecdote. Governor Hutchinson, in the plenitude of his Vanity and self sufficiency, thought he could convince all America and all Europe, that the Parliament of Great Britain had an authority supreme, sovereign, absolute and...
Is your daughter, Mrs Stewart, who I am credibly informed is one of the most accomplished Ladies, a Painter? Are you acquainted with Miss Lydia Smith, who I am also credibly informed is one of he most accomplished Ladies and a Painter? Do you know Mr. Sargent? Do you correspond with your old companion in Arms Colo. John Trumbull? Do you think Fisher will be an historical Painter? Whenever you...
I have received your obliging favour of the 8th. but cannot consent to your resolution to ask no more questions. Your questions revive my sluggish memory—. Since our national Legislature have established a national Painter, a wise measure for which I thank them, my imagination runs upon the art & has already painted I know not how many historical pictures. I have sent you one give me leave to...
Mr William Smith Shaw has lent me the fourth Volume of his political pamphlets, the first tract of which is the Controversy between Governor Hutchinson, and the two Houses of the Legislature in 1773 concerning the Souvereign Authority of Parliament over the Colonies. I knew there was such a Pamphlet; but I had not seen it for more than forty Years, and I feared it was lost. I have enquired for...
I pretend not to preserve any order, in my Letters to you. I give you hints, as they accidently occur to me, which, an hundred years hence, may be considered as Memoires pour Servir a l’histoire des Etas Unis.—I am about to write to you the most melancholly Letter, I ever wrote in my Life. One, which the most deeply touches my Soul with Greif.—And now, I know not where to begin, nor how to...
I have this moment received your favour of yesterday. In some future Letter I must write you an Apology for S. Adams and J. Hancock: which your inherent good nature will not reject. Please to give to your Son the inclosed Inquiston, with / Cordial regards of, We have this Moment the news of J Q A Acceptance, and hopes to embark in all May— MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
That Mr Hutchinson repented, as sincerely as Mr Hamilton did, I doubt not. I hope the Repentance of both has been accepted and their fault pardoned. And I hope I have repented, do repent and shall ever repent of mine and meet them both in an other World, where there will need no Repentance. Such vicissitudes of Fortune command, compassion; I pitty even Napolion. You never profoundly admired Mr...
You “never profoundly admired Mr. H.” I have suggested some hints in his favour. You “never profoundly admired Mr S A”! I have promised you an apology for him, you may think it a weak one, for I have no talent at Panegyric or Apology. “There are all sorts of men in the world.” This observation you may say is self evident & futile; yet Mr Locke, thought it not unworthy of him to make it and if...
As we have amused ourselves with looking at a few pictures, suppose we should add one more to the Gallery. The Artist makes the scene of his action that spacious Apartment that we very properly denominated Fanuel Hall. The Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the Judges, the Counsellors, the Representatives, the President and Professors & Students of the University; the Docters of Law, Physic, &...
I have read your discourse with pleasure, and the notes with terror. they open a field of controversy so solemn, as to intimidate the boldest champions of which race of heroes, I certainly have not the honour to be one. I may however pretend to be a humble projecter, and in that character would propose, 1st. To petition the holy league to purchase of the Turks, peaceably if they can, forcibly...