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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 31-60 of 2,037 sorted by relevance
Enclosed is an Account of the Cost of your two Casks of Wine of the charges which I have paid upon it—Agreeably to your desire I shall acquaint Doctor Tufts of the amount that he may discharge it when convenient I understand our friend Mr Harrison does not accept the appointment of Consul at Cadiz—My Brother Richard whom I believe is honored with being personally known to you I am flattered to...
I hope your Excellency will pardon my presumption in sending to you these books, with the specimens; and condescend to accept the same in acknowledgment of my gratitude for the notices you have honor’d me with: I send two other copies to Uncle Cranch, one for himself, and the other for the Academy; and 3 or 4 more for other friends in New England,—having some apprehension that the work neither...
I received this morning the Letter you did me the honour to write me, communicating the resolution of the Second Presbyterian Church in Arch Street, of the 29th Ultimo, appropriating the large Pew fronting the Pulpit, and the two Pews adjoining it, for the Use of the Vice President of the United States and Such members of both Houses of Congress as choose during their Sessions to worship in...
A ship sailing in the morning as it interests you to know the state of the Nation. I have the pleasure to advice you that the appearances promises perfect accomplishment of the Revolution. All the Chiefs in opposition are fled. The National assembly proceed, and are advand in the Ground Work of the Constition, the most Liberal that to this has been held out to any Social Body, not Excepting...
By special request of my Brother at Alicante I have the Honour of communicating to your Excellency in his name of the demise of the Dey of Algeirs on the 12th of July, and that the Minister Ali Hassan Who Was always Mr Montgomery friend is now Dey and that Sir. Soliman an Algerun Nobleman Who paid him a Visit at Alicante is promoted in consequence from those circumstances Mr Montgomery has no...
In its due time, I received your Letter from Philadelphia of the 27. of July. Although, in the Opinion of The Secretary of State, the Mission to Holland may be “almost exclusively reduced to a pecuniary Negotiation,” yet, in the Opinion of others among whom your father is one, the Post at the Hague is an important Diplomatick Station, which may afford many opportunities of acquiring political...
Permit me to introduce to your Notice Mr. Samuel Miller the Son of a much esteemed Clergyman, late of Dover in the Delaware State, and formerly known to you, as I understand, there were some Connections between your Families. He has undertaken a Tour to Boston to learn the political and ecclesiastical State of your Country, before he settles himself in a Pastoral Relation to any Church. He is...
Docr. Edwards of Philada. will be so obliging as to take charge of this Letter. I regret that he & Mrs. Edwards leave this peace so soon—. You will find him a Gentleman of extensive Information.—He has visited the greater part of this Kingdom, and paid particular attention to the Husbandry of it.—Permit me to introduce him to You. I have heard, and wish it may be true, that your Son is...
The within documents, from my Friend the Count de Segur Minister Plenipotentiary of France at St. Petersburg, will shew you in some degree my Reasons for leaving Russia, and the danger to which I have been exposed by the mean subterfuges and dark intrigues of asiatic jealousy and malice. —Your former Friendship for me, which I remember with particular pleasure and have always been ambitious to...
Yesterday, I had the Pleasure of receiving our letter of the 16th of March. My Son’s name is John Quincy Adams which you knew very well, so that by ushering the Pamphlet into the world in the Name of John Adams Esq. it still might pass for mine. I understand all this very well. Booksellers Policy! All I have to Say is that I did not write Publicola nor any Part of it: if you wish to know...
As I had promised myself much Pleasure, in a few hours Conversation with you in my Way to Philadelphia, I was greatly disappointed when I found you were absent, and Still more pained with I found heard you had been out of Health. Your Journey has I hope been of service to you. I lived in constant hope that We should have the Pleasure to See you in the Course of the last Summer at Braintree:...
In Compliance with the Request of Sir John Sinclair I have the Pleasure of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Book which I recd. from him two Days ago. As it is now probable that Col. Smith will meet with a greater number of opportunities of sending it than will occur to me, I shall take the Liberty of committing it to his care— Be pleased to present Mrs. Jay & my best Compts. to Mrs....
Your Letter of April 27 was put into the Post office at New York and I have neither seen nor heard of M r Dorr nor M r Jones. It is probable they found a Conveyance for their Letters in the ship which carries our Envoy Extraordinary and their Journey to this Town became unnecessary. I should have been glad to have seen them and I suppose they might have obtained their Request without...
I have received with pleasure your kind letter of the 17th of March, and should be happy to have an opportunity of serving you both with regard to your services and early attachment to the cause of your country, and from an agreable recollection of your private character and my former person acquaintance with you. But the office I hold is totally detached from the executive authority, and...
I have this morning received your favours of Jan. 7 and February the first with the Newspapers for which I thank you— I rec d some days ago a Letter with the Review and some other Papers. I thank you for all these Marks of your kind Attention. a few Lines from you are always acceptable as they are Information of your Health and Situation, but your long Letters are fraught with such Information...
I take the Liberty of inclosing the Plan of an Agreement which I am anxious should be entered into by the powers of Europe and the United States of America for the purpose of rewarding those who make any discovery of General benefit to Society. Having endeavoured in the inclosed Paper to delineate the Nature and importance of Such a measure, it is unnecessary for me to trouble you with...
Being informed by Judge Livermore that Mr Pickering and myself are nominated for this District; may I ask the favor of your influence in my behalf; you know both our standing in the Law Department, & know that he never had the preference there given him; you know the part I took in the American Contest, and cannot be ignorant that he refused from the commencement of Hostilities untill 1780 to...
I have received your kind Letter of the 30 Jan and thank you, for your obliging Complaisance in nominating Dr. Bancroft to be a Member of our Academy and for your Compliments on the issue of the late Election. When you assure me, that your Brethren of the Clergy, of the Colledge and of the Accademy are “almost without an Exception my real Friends” you assure me of an approbation very much to...
You will easily believe that none of your Friends rejoice more heartily than myself, in the Decided Majority, which has secured your Re-election. In spite of calumny, art & intrigue, you have the firm support of Ten States. I congratulate you on the event, but still more congratulate my Country. For nothing can be more favorable to our future prospects than to find, that one of the firmest...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...
The Old Debtors to British subjects, united with the over Zealous Friends of France and the Democratical societies of our principal Cities, are urging a sequestration of Things in Action: and as I know you are not inattentive to any question of public Law, I have inclosed you some minutes of Authorities and I wish you to look into all others relative to this subject. I have not Grotius here,...
I have received and read with great Pleasure your Letter: but having lent it to Col. Humphreys I cannot now answer it so particularly as I wish.—I thank you for it and desire the continuance of your Observations and Speculations in the Same Way. You have quoted a Poet, much to the Purpose: I wish to know whether it is Shakespear, and where it is to be found.—I would not wish you to be...
I have a few papers to send you, and cannot omit the occasion to say a few words, though I have but very few to say. Our own affairs are at a stand. Mr: Pinckney will be here in the course of this week, and I have not chosen to do any thing conclusive before his return.—I believe there are people here, who like Publicola much better than they think of its reputed author. You have long known,...
Permit me in this severe Season, to Salute your fireside, and congratulate you on your return from the Northern Circuit. As the time approaches when We are to expect the Pleasure of Seeing you at the Supream Court in Philadelphia, you will give me leave to Solicit the Honour and the Pleasure of your Company and that of Mrs Jay, and whoever else of the Family who may accompany you, at Bush...
I write this note just to inclose you a couple of newspapers. Such is the variable & distracted state of affairs at present here and all over Europe that it is impossible to form an opinion one day that events of the next will not overturn. The cabinet of St Jame’s having involved this nation in the fortunes of Prussia—it is next to impossible that a general war shou’d not ensue. France has...
A Ship for Philadelphia sailing to morrow gives me the opportunity to transmit you the papers of the Day too interesting not to be acceptable The reigning Spirrit appears determin’d on a change in that part of the Constitution that delagated the Executive Power in an Hereditary Chief, The short space that has Elapst since the existence of his Power has demonstrated the Vice of that...
The bearer of this Letter Mr: Montfort is a clergyman who being compelled to leave his Country, has for some time past found a refuge in this; but is at present obliged also to retire from hence. He has some expectation of going to America; and being unacquainted with the Language and altogether unknown there, he has requested some Letter that should bear testimony in his behalf. Without...
I duely received your obligin letter of the 27th of August; but a journey to Philadelphia, and the confusion of preparations to remove to that City, have prevented an earlier answer to it. I concur very freely and very fully with you, in your sentiments respecting the appointments of Consuls abroad; but I find the President and Secretary of State, are impressed with an apprehension of censure,...
I know not where to find you—Whether in Holland England or Portugal—Whether to address you as a married Man or a Single one. And I am equally at a Loss what to write to you. one thing I am at no loss to say that your Letters have continued up to N o. 23. inclusively to delight and inform me, and that I beg you not to be discouraged from continuing your favours, by my Remissness in Writing Our...
at 9 last night I arriv’d and this Morning have taken my Seat from whence I write this. I have just rec d yours of 22. Nov. with its Inclosure. I am told most confidently that all the Votes in N. Y. will be for Clinton and all the Votes in Pensilvania for me. I believe neither. If the People of the Union are capable of being influenced by Such Characters as Dallas and Edwards, I should be...