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Upon our Return to Massachusetts, I found myself elected by the Town of Braintree into the provincial Congress, and attended that Service as long as it sat. About this time, Drapers Paper in Boston swarmed with Writers, and among an immense quantity of meaner productions appeared a Writer under the Signature of Massachusettensis, suspected but never that I knew ascertained to be written by two...
£ s d To the Hire of two Horses at £10 each 20: 0: 0 To the Hire of a Sulky £8:0s:0d 8: 0: 0 To the Wages of a servant from the 26 of April to the 14th. of August at £3 per Month 10:16:0 10: 16: 0 To Cash paid Mrs. Yard in Philadelphia for Board and Lodging for myself and Servant &c. Pensylvania Currency £38:13s:6d 30: 18: 10 To Cash paid Hannah Hiltzheimer for keeping my Horses
Another Clause in the Charter, quoted by this Writer, contains the Power “to make Laws and ordinancies, for the good and Welfare of the said Company, and for the Government and ordering of the Said Lands and Plantations and the People inhabiting the Same; So as such Laws and Ordinances be not contrary or repugnant to the Laws and Statutes of this our Realm of England.” This is the usual Clause...
£ s d May 31. 1775 pd. Jos. Bass a Dollar 0: 6: 0 pd. him before 2 Dollars 0: 12: 0 pd. him before at Braintree a Guinea 1: 8: 0 Aug. 14. 1775. To ballance of your Acct. left at Philadelphia, as you recollect it if wrong to be rectified 2: 8:
5[April 1775] (Adams Papers)
Heard Mr. Strong all Day. At Night, a Man came in and inform’d us of the Death of Josa. Quincy.—Proh Dolor! First diary entry in a stitched booklet with marbled paper covers labeled by JA : “Account. 1775.” Not numbered by CFA in the sequence of JA ’s MS Diaries, this booklet has been assigned the number D/JA/22B by the present editors. It contains only two diary entries (30 April, 3 Sept....
Heard Mr. Strong all Day. At Night, a Man came in and inform’d us of the Death of Josa. Quincy.—Proh Dolor! First diary entry in a stitched booklet with marbled paper covers labeled by JA : “Account. 1775.” Not numbered by CFA in the sequence of JA ’s MS Diaries, this booklet has been assigned the number D/JA/22B by the present editors. It contains only two diary entries (30 April, 3 Sept....
I arrived here, last Evening, and have attended Mr. Strongs Meeting all this Day. I rode alone, all the Way to this Place. Here I found my worthy Brothers Hancock and Adams. Cushing, We hear, spends this Day at Windham, and has sent us Word that he will join us here, tomorrow.—Mr. Paine is here too.—All well. We have good Accounts from N. York and N. Ca rolina —very good. I have no Doubts now...
New York has appointed an ample Representation in our Congress, and have appointed a provincial Congress. The People of the City, have siezed the City Arms and Ammunition, out of the Hands of the Mayor who is a Creature of the Governor. Lord North will be certainly disappointed, in his Expectation of seducing New York. The Tories there, durst not shew their Heads. The Jerseys are arroused, and...
9[In Congress, May 1775] (Adams Papers)
Congress assembled and proceeded to Business, and the Members appeared to me to be of one Mind, and that mind after my own heart. I dreaded the danger of disunion and divisions among Us, and much more among the People. It appeared to me, that all Petitions, Remonstrances and Negotiations, for the future would be fruitless and only occasion a Loss of time and give Opportunity to the Ennemy to...
Our Hearts are bleeding for the poor People of Boston. What will, or can be done for them I cant conceive. God preserve them. I take this opportunity, to write, by our Committee who were sent to this Colony, just to let you know that I am comfortable, and shall proceed this afternoon. Pray write to me, and get all my Friends to write and let me be informed of every Thing that occurs. Send your...
Mr. Eliot of Fairfield, is this Moment arrived in his Way to Boston. He read us a Letter from the Dr. his Father dated Yesterday Sennight being Sunday. The Drs. Description of the Melancholly of the Town, is enough to melt a Stone. The Tryals of that unhappy and devoted People are likely to be severe indeed. God grant that the Furnace of Affliction may refine them. God grant that they may be...
We are very anxious to know the State of Things at Boston, Cambridge, Watertown and Roxbury. The Accounts We have here are very confused and uncertain. I hope the News Papers, will come now. Our Accounts from N. York are very well. That Province is getting into a Train, which will Secure the Union of the Colonies, and Success to their Efforts. The little, dirty, ministerial Party there, is...
I have only One Moments opportunity of acknowledging your favor of the 30th of Decr and of informing you that the Packet inclosed was sent agreeable to direction. Every friend of Liberty and the English Constitution rejoice to hear of the Firmness and unanimity of our Brethren in America. By your own Virtue, Valor and Perseverance you are to expect a deliverance from the Yoke. Every attempt...
I have but little news to write you. Every thing of that kind you will learn by a more accurate hand than mine; things remain much in the same situation here that they were when you went away, there has been no Desent upon the sea coast. Guards are regularily kept, and people seem more settled, and are returning to their husbandry.—I feel somewhat lonesome. Mr. Thaxter is gone home, Mr. Rice...
I received by the Deacon two Letters from you this Day from Hartford. I feel a recruit of spirits upon the reception of them, and the comfortable news which they contain. We had not heard any thing from N. Carolina before, and could not help feeling anxious least we should find a defection there, arising more from their ancient feuds and animosities, than from any setled ill will in the...
After I had Executed my Commission at Providence, I Returned Home set Mrs. Warren down in her own Habitation, made the best provision I could for the security of our Family, and some of our Effects which we considered to be not very safe at Plymouth, and Immediately hastened to this place in order to contribute my mite to the publick Service in this Exigence of affairs. Here I have been near a...
I have an opportunity by Captn. Beale, to write you a Line. We all arrived last Night in this City. It would take many Sheets of Paper, to give you a Description of the Reception, We found here. The Militia were all in Arms, and almost the whole City out to Meet us. The Tories are put to Flight here, as effectually as the Mandamus Council at Boston. They have associated, to stand by...
Jno. Adams Esqr. To Daniel Smith Dr. 1775 £  s d May 13th. To Bottle Brandy 2 6 26. To Bottle do. 2 6 July 10. To Quart Spirits 2
Having wrote fully upon several Subjects to Mr. Hancock and Mr. Adams, upon several Matters which they will communicate to you, I can only add here that I Yesterday heard from your Family at Braintree were all in Health. A person having brought me a Letter from your Lady to me recommending one of your Brothers to be a Major in one of the Regiments, I am sorry the Letter did not arrive sooner,...
I am vastly obliged to you for your Letter. It was like cold Water to a thirsty Soul. We Suffer, greatly for Want of News from you and Boston. I am very unfortunate, in my Eyes, and my Health. I came from home Sick and have been so ever Since. My Eyes are so weak and dim that I can neither read, write, or see without great Pain. Our unweildy Body moves very Slow. We shall do something in Time,...
Suppose you have had a formidable account of the alarm we had last Sunday morning. When I rose about six oclock I was told that the Drums had been some time beating and that 3 allarm Guns were fired, that Weymouth Bell had been ringing, and Mr. Welds was then ringing. I immediatly sent of an express to know the occasion, and found the whole Town in confusion. 3 Sloops and one cutter had come...
I embrace an Opportunity by two young Gentlemen from Maryland to write you a Line, on friend Mifflins Table. The Names of these Gentlemen, are Hall. They are of one of the best Families in Maryland, and have independent Fortunes, one a Lawyer the other a Physician. If you have an Opportunity I beg you would shew to these Gentlemen all the Civilities possible. Get them introduced to your Uncle...
The Bearers of this are two young Gentlemen from Maryland, of one of the best and first Families in that Province. One of them is a Lawyer, the other a Physician. Both have independent Fortunes. Such is their Zeal in the Cause of America, and Such their fellow Feeling for the People of our Province, that they are determined to Spend the Summer, in our Camp in order to gain Experience and...
Our amiable Friend Hancock, who by the Way is our President, is to send his Servant, tomorrow for Cambridge. I am to send a few Lines by him. If his Man should come to you to deliver this Letter, treat him very kindly, because he is a kind, humane, clever Fellow. My Friend Joseph Bass, very cleverly caught the Small Pox, in two days after we arrived here, by Inoculation and has walked about...
The Bearers of this are two young Gentlemen from Maryland. Aquilla Hall and Josias Carvill Hall, both of one of the best Families in Maryland, and both of independent Fortunes. Their Errand to Cambridge, is to join our Army as Volunteers, against the Enemies of their Country in order to gain Experience, in the Art of War, in which they have already made good Proficiency. As it is of importance...
This Measure of Imbecility, the second Petition to the King embarrassed every Exertion of Congress: it occasioned Motions and debates without End for appointing Committees to draw up a declaration of the Causes, Motives, and Objects of taking Arms, with a view to obtain decisive declarations against Independence &c. In the Mean time the New England Army investing Boston, the New England...
27[Fryday June 9th. 1775.] (Adams Papers)
On Fryday June 9th. 1775. The report of the Committee on the Letter from the Convention of Massachusetts Bay being again read, the Congress came into the following Resolution: Resolved, That no Obedience being due to the Act of Parliament, for altering the Charter of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, nor to a Governor or Lieutenant Governor who will not observe the directions of, but endeavour...
An ancient, and accounted a long headed Man, in these parts, has drop’d some words devising a scheme of reconciliation between the Colonies and Mother Country; which I think worthy of notice; and I am persuaded your zeal to a reconciliation is such that you will lend an ear to healing propositions, let it come from what quarter it may. Otherwise you would be unworthy of that eminence of...
29[Fryday June 2. 1775.] (Adams Papers)
On Fryday June 2. 1775. Journals of Congress, page 112. The President laid before Congress a Letter from the Provincial Convention of Massachusetts Bay dated May 16. which was read, setting forth the difficulties they labour under, for want of a regular form of Government, and as they and the other Colonies are now compelled to raise an Army to defend themselves from the Butcheries and...
I had Yesterday the Pleasure of two Letters from you, by Dr. Church. We had been so long without any Intelligence from our Country, that the Sight of the Dr. gave us great Joy. I have received no Letters from England, untill the Dr. brought me one from Mr. Dilly. Mr. Henly goes, tomorrow, to the Camp at Cambridge. I am not so ill, as I was when I left you, tho not well. Bass has recover’d of...
Saturday June the 3d 1775. Congress however ordered the Letter to lie under on the Table for farther Consideration. On Saturday June the 3d 1775. The Letter from the Convention of the Massachusetts Bay dated the 16th. of May, being again read, the Subject was again discussed, and then Resolved That a Committee of five Persons be chosen, to consider the same and report what in their Opinion is...
While you are anxiously engaged to preserve the rights of your Country, I cannot entertain the least doubt, but you will readily excuse this address, when I assure you, I am induced to it, from a Sincere desire to promote the common cause of America in this City. The Delegates of this Colony who are in Trade, can inform you, I have no private interest, in the Subject on which I now Sollicit...
I have received yours of 24th. May and a Copy of your Letter to Mr. Dilly, and one Letter from him. Your Letter to him is a very agreable one. I hope you will continue to write him, whenever you have Opportunity. I am afraid you will have more Alarms than are necessary, in Consequence of the Brush at Grape Island. But I hope you will maintain your philosophical Composure. Saturday last, I took...
34[Wednesday June 7. 1775.] (Adams Papers)
On Wednesday June 7. 1775. On motion resolved, that Thursday the 20th. of July next be observed throughout the twelve united Colonies, as a Day of Humiliation, Fasting and Prayer; and that Mr. Hooper, Mr. J. Adams and Mr. Paine, be a Committee to bring in a resolve for that purpose. The Committee appointed to prepare Advice in Answer to the Letter from the Convention of Massachusetts Bay,...
Two days ago, I was very agreably surprized by a Letter from you, which was acceptable both for the important public Intelligence it contained and as it informed me of your Escape from Boston. I had suffered much Anxiety, on Account of yourself and your Family, supposing you were confined in Town and subject to I knew not what Inconveniences or Indignities. I cant yet learn that Mr. Boylstone,...
We have been puzzled to discover, what we ought to do, with the Canadians and Indians. Several Persons, have been before the Congress who have lately been in the Province of Canada, particularly Mr. Brown and Mr. Price, who have informed us that the French are not unfriendly to us. And by all that we can learn of the Indians, they intend to be neutral. But whether We Should march into Canada...
The great Character he hath heard of you, induces a private Man to offer to your Consideration the following Hints, with an Assurance, that your Regard for your Country, will improve upon them for the general Good of all America. When one Colony is declared to be in actual Rebellion, when all the others are anounced to be accessary to, and Favourers of that Rebellion, when the Sword is drawn,...
Dr. Church returns to Day, and with smarting Eyes, I must write a few Lines to you. I never had in my Life, such severe Duty to do, and was never worse qualified to do it. My Eyes depress my Spirits and my Health is quite infirm. Yet I keep about and attend Congress very constantly. I wish I could write freely to you my Dear, but I can not. The Scene before me, is complicated enough. It...
Dr. Church has given me a Lotion, which has helped my Eyes so much that I hope you will hear from me oftener than you have done. Pray write me as often and particularly as possible. Send your Letters to the Care of the Committee of safety who will forward them. I long to know, how you fare, and whether you are often discomposed with Alarms. Guard yourself against them my Dear. I think you are...
It would be a Relief to my Mind, if I could write freely to you concerning the Sentiments Principles, Facts and Arguments which are laid before us, in Congress: But Injunctions, and Engagements of Honour render this impossible. What I learn out of Doors among Citizens, Gentlemen, and Persons of all Denominations is not so sacred. I find that the general Sense abroad is to prepare for a...
I have written a few Lines to Dr Warren to whom I refer you. It is of vast Importance that the officers of our Army should be impressed with the absolute Necessity of Cleanliness, to preserve the Health of their Men. Cleanness, is one of the three Cardinal Virtues of a soldier, as Activity and Sobriety are the other two. They should be encouraged to go into Water frequently, to keep their...
I have been this Morning to hear Mr. Duffil, a Preacher in this City whose Principles, Prayers and Sermons more nearly resemble those of our New England Clergy than any that I have heard. His Discourse was a kind of Exposition on the thirty fifth Chapter of Isaiah.—America was the Wilderness and the Solitary Place, and he said it would be glad, rejoice, and blossom as the Rose. He laboured to...
Mr. Gadsden of South Carolina whose Fame you must have heard, was in his younger Years, an officer, on board the Navy, and is well acquainted with the Fleet. He has Several Times taken Pains to convince me that this Fleet is not so formidable to America, as we fear. He Says, We can easily take their sloops, Schooners, and Cutters, on board of whom are all their best Seamen, and with these We...
Since my last I have waited with Impatience to hear from you. I mean Individually. The public Expectation to hear from the Congress is great. They dont Complain but they wonder that the Congress should set a month without their receiveing something decisive with regard to us. I presume we shall have it in due time, at least that nothing will be wanting in your power to relieve the distresses...
Resolved that it be and hereby it is recommended to the Inhabitants of the united Colonies in America of all Denominations That Thursday the 20th day of July next be set apart as a day of public humiliation fasting and prayer, that a total Abstinence from servile labor and recreation be observed and all their religious Assemblies solemnly convened to humble themselves before God under the...
John Adams Esqr. B ough t of J. Young Junr. 1775 June 14. To a new Pad and Double raind Curb Bridle £  14 6 15. Mendg. an old Bridle 1 July 3. To a Cover for sword Scabboard 3 14. To a small pad for housings 2
I set down to write to you a monday, but really could not compose myself sufficently: the anxiety I sufferd from not hearing one syllable from you for more than five weeks; and the new distress ariseing from the arrival of recruits agitated me more than I have been since the never to be forgotten 14 of April. I have been much revived by receiving two letters from you last Night, one by the...
The Day; perhaps the decisive Day is come on which the fate of America depends. My bursting Heart must find vent at my pen. I have just heard that our dear Friend Dr. Warren is no more but fell gloriously fighting for his Country—saying better to die honourably in the field than ignominiously hang upon the Gallows. Great is our Loss. He has distinguished himself in every engagement, by his...
This Letter, I presume, will go by the brave and amiable General Washington. Our Army will have a Group of Officers, equal to any service. Washington, Ward, Lee, Gates, Gridley, together with all the other New England officers, will make a glorious Council of War. This Congress are all as deep, as the Delegates from the Massachuchusetts, and the whole Continent as forward as Boston. We shall...
I have at last obtained liberty, by a vote of Congress, to acquaint my friends with a few of the things that have been done. The Congress have voted, or rather a committee of the whole house have unanimously agreed, that the sum of two million dollars be issued in bills of credit, for the redemption of which, in a certain number of years, twelve colonies have unanimously pledged themselves....