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    • Lovell, James
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    • Revolutionary War
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Lovell, James" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
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Decr. 2d. Resolved that a Commission be made out for Mr. J. Adams similar to that heretofore granted to the Commissioners at the Court of France. The date of the Commissions upon the 27th. was an error of the Secretary. But He as well as the president and others think it of no consequence. In Congress Decr. 17th. 1777 Resolved that Genl. Washington be directed to inform Genl. Burgoyne the...
Your Favor of Octr. 17th. came this day to hand by the Post and contains such flattering Sentiments in regard to my subserving your Mission as almost to intoxicate me into a Wish that I had not spurned much personal Honor and family Emolument in pursuing a comparitively evident public Interest. But, nearly drunken as you have made me, depend upon it I am sober enough to distinguish between the...
That you may excuse my vile manner of doing business, know that I am freezing in my little room this morning so that I can scarcely hold my pen, but, I am, here, in quiet. The sealed packet sent before contained Triplicates of Octr. 31st Novr. 1 and 8 which last were only an Introduction of the Bearer Col: Ewen, and an Annunciation of Mr. Laurens’s Election as President so that his Draughts...
After the Resolve for stopping Burgoyne had passed, some were of opinion that a State of Facts found by the Committee should have preceeded the reasoning. Perhaps you will judge that it is already too laboured a report. I inclose for your own use the State of Facts alluded to which did not enter into the business of Congress; but was only talked of. We have intelligence now that 2 Hoits...
I shall endeavor to write largely to you, en Ami, but I will not risque the Sailing of the Vessel for that Purpose, at this moment. It is reported Mr. Searle is taken; our Affairs in Holland must in such Case be very bad as you will not have received any Powers for acting instead of Mr. Laurens who is too probably taken and carried to England from New foundland. And I also know of other...
Congress took into Consideration the Report of the Committee on the Letter of June 26th. from the Honble. John Adams, whereupon Ordered That the said Letter be referred to the Committee of foreign Affairs; and that they be instructed to inform Mr. Adams of the Satisfaction which Congress receives from his industrious Attention to the Interest and Honor of these United States abroad especially...
I inclose to you a Peice of Intelligence perhaps altogether new. The uti possidetis offered by Spain will appear alarming perhaps to some but we are told She acted upon full Knowledge that King George the 3d of England had sworn in his Cabinet that he would not acknowledge our Independence. Spain at least knew that we would never enter into any commercial Treaty without a total relinquishment...
Mr. Geary otherways engaged has given me the pleasure of forwarding this Intelligence from your friend Jefferson respecting the ready concurrence of the Dominion with the Articles sent lately to the States in a hope of cementing them together in a firm League. I am particularly rejoyced at this dispatch at this critical time when things appear almost desperate in this neighbourhood. As a...
I send you a few Prints and the last monthly Journals yet from the Press. The Enemy will give you one of the most candid accounts of the naval Engagement on the 16th. that I have at any time seen in Rivington’s royal Gazette. Our Allies have conducted most gallantly: a Fog which seperated their Ships a few days before the Engagement deprived them of the Opportunity of giving an immense Turn to...
It appears by Returns this day received from Genl. Gates that Burgoine must have destroyed his Standards and almost every other military Trophy during the Capitulation. Not one Musket fit for use was delivered, not one Scabbard to a Bayonett or Cutlass. We are told that instead of piling the Arms the Enemy chose to ground them, that the Waggons might more certainly crush them. Gates does not...